#1
Hey guys.. i have a very annoying problem, I'm trying to get into singing, but those damn high notes are killing me... i wanna learn to sing falsetto, and i keep hearing "owh it takes almost no training.. its so basic.. you just stretch out the chords and use alot of air". Which is Not working for me, it just feels like I'm squeezing the high notes.. which i don't want. My biggest vocal inspirations atm are Coldplay and Muse... which demands some serious high notes.. (don't wanna go all the way into Matt Bellamy territory though)

can someone please help me? .. I've tried loads of vocal exercises.. lip rolls, Nay nay nay, and mum, mum, mum .. all that stuff... but it just feels really hard..
#4
Yes, you should have an understanding of your range.

Perhaps, sing along with your keyboard (if you have one), ascending/descending on just white keys to see how far you can sing. The middle C is Octave #4.
#5
Quote by joshpunk
Hey guys.. i have a very annoying problem, I'm trying to get into singing, but those damn high notes are killing me... i wanna learn to sing falsetto, and i keep hearing "owh it takes almost no training.. its so basic.. you just stretch out the chords and use alot of air". Which is Not working for me, it just feels like I'm squeezing the high notes.. which i don't want. My biggest vocal inspirations atm are Coldplay and Muse... which demands some serious high notes.. (don't wanna go all the way into Matt Bellamy territory though)

can someone please help me? .. I've tried loads of vocal exercises.. lip rolls, Nay nay nay, and mum, mum, mum .. all that stuff... but it just feels really hard..


Falsetto is not "easy" to get right. It is indeed putting up your high voice, but unless you train it well you'll just sound like a transsexual schoolgirl rather then a singer using falsetto.

Singing IS hard. Your using your own body as an instrument. SO rather then just your hands, liek guitar and keyboard, you're training your entire body.

As for you doing the exercises, getting a keyboard helps tremendously getting those notes right. Basicly what you're doing is "tuning" you vocal cords. Getting used to the tension and power you need for vowels and notes.

I can recommend the singing thread, but from my own experience I can tell you that a teacher will get you to a level of actually singing properly in a good way, rather then forcing anything yourself.

Cheers and good luck!
#6
you have to work your way up man....just start at the top of the range of notes you still feel come out really comfortably and work up to the high ones
#7
good advice here already, the best thing you can do is keep singing. You have to know your voice, know your range etc. Matt Bellamay has a much higher voice than Chris Martin in terms of his full voice, Chris Martin's high notes are mostly all falsetto and they're actually not too hard to reach for most male singers once you nail that transition between the notes.

If you want to work on your falsetto, sing a lot of songs in falsetto and really pay attention to your tone. You have to train yourself to make the right position every time, so it becomes natural. Kind of like muscle memory for learning riffs and licks on guitar etc.

After you have developed a falsetto tone you are happy with (and it is an ever growing thing), then also start to work on the transition from a full voice note, to one in your falsetto. Because this is where most of it falls apart at first - the transition is something that needs a lot of practice. One thing that helps you nail this is recording yourself singing full voice to falsetto (ie record a chorus to a coldplay song). You won't really notice what you really sound like until you do hear yourself back on a recording.

Start slow as others have said, start with songs that use a little falsetto. Coldplay have many many songs that are good for training your voice.

Before you do anything you need to know your own range though, know what notes you can hit after a good warmup without straining. One good way to develop is do some singing in a choir, it's a seriously good way to be forced to use a lot of control. Not like a big community choir but a smaller one.
Last edited by ChrisBG at Jul 13, 2009,
#8
wow thanx for all of the great suggestions and help! i will definately start taking all of these things into consideration when practicing and singing.
#9
Quote by Shoj_
Yes, you should have an understanding of your range.

Perhaps, sing along with your keyboard (if you have one), ascending/descending on just white keys to see how far you can sing. The middle C is Octave #4.


A guitar will work just as well in terms of singing along with reference notes.