#1
Hello all

I'm currently into my second week of electric guitar ownership (wooo rock on!!) and I was curious about people's opinions on what the best "learning strategy" is for an absolute beginner guitarist.

What should I try and learn first?

What technique-teaching songs do people think best to learn first?

I've looked at "Guitar For Dummies" and other such books but I don't know what the best strategy is to get decent at guitar as soon as possible...

You might find it useful to know that I'm not trying to be the next Hendrix! I'm trying to learn guitar just for casual playing and learning to play some fave songs.

Thanks!

Dave
#2
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#3
seriously find someone that's been playing a while and have them show you some stuff, look at youtube video lessons and all that stuff. i've learned so much by jamming with others.
#4
there is an awesome youtube channel called "rockongoodpeople". they have hundreds of lessons tought by professionals that have really helped me.
#5
Ah, the disputed topic. You have 2 paths, my son: Self-taught or Lessons.

Self-taught Pros:
Your own pace-your own songs to learn
Less Cost

Self-taught Cons:
Motivate yourself or no one will
Chance of picking up bad technique habits

Lessons Pros:
You have a good chance of learning techniques the proper way
Should be quicker to learn

Lessons Cons
:
Costs more
Sometimes hard to follow [however this depends on the teacher's teaching abilities].

Your choice now.

In my world, the color RED doesn't exist.

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#6
I would say learn your open chords first. You can play a lot of songs with just three or four chords. Also check our your local library. Mine has several good instruction books and videos (tab books too). Pretty useful. Good luck!
#7
Check out http://www.justinguitar.com/ for a pretty decent starters course. He just revamped it all so it's a work in progress, but the old course is still there as well

Your main concern should be to setup a plan and stick to it. Don't just pickup your guitar and play randomly. Depending on how much time you have, look to work on a couple techniques a day. To start you should probably work on the fingering of chords and chord changes. It would also be beneficial to work on doing chromatic scales to start building finger strength and independence. Another thing you should start early is learning the fretboard notes. A decent way of doing this is picking a note, say 'A' and then finding and playing it on each string over and over again. Try and do one note a week, this way you can really get used to it. After awhile you can start to work on your techniques such as hammer-ons and pull-offs, but you really shouldn't worry about this until your fingers are relatively comfortable with the fretboard. If you want some further examples, look at the course under the afforementioned link, he has practice schedules outlined for beginners.
You gotta put your faith in a loud guitar.
#8
Hey mate, im in exactly the same position as u, i got my guitar just bout a week and a half ago. I also got the Dummies guide to Guitar book. It isnt to bad, seems to have some good explinations in it and pushes patience, I cant say how good it is overall though as i have not finished it yet and have nothing else to compare it with.

When i decided to get a guitar i thought i would try and self learn using the internet books etc and see how that goes and if im stuggling i will look for lessons. I just know a few chords atm and im trying to build up my muscle memory in fingers to help. My play is really slow but i can slowly feel it building. Strumming is the area im struggling more with. Has anybody got any surgestions to where i could help improve my strumming

I do like just picking up my guitar and playin chords and messing bout with my whammy bar for no real purpose than the nice sounds
#9
A couple of things.

Justinguitar.com is a great site to use. It's probably as close to a teacher you're going to get without an actual teacher.

I'd also use the Ultimate Guide to Guitar(on this site). It is for a total beginner and goes up to advanced lessons, and is extremely well written. It helped me a lot.

Balance learning songs and practicing. Learning songs is fun and is a great way to stay interested in guitar since everybody has a guitar player they want to play like. But, learning songs won't really help you get better. You have to actually practice for that to happen. It's great to learn songs, but don't make that all you do.

But the most important is play everyday. When I first started, I played nonstop for a week and then played on and off, and I kick myself everyday for it. If you want tog et good, you really have to practice everday using a practice schedule that wil actually help you(this is why teachers are so good, they tell you exactly what to practice)

I'd suggest learning some chords first. Once you memorize the important chord shaped and can switch well between them, move on to learning scales and some music theory. Music theory is a big pain in the ass and is going to bore the hell out of you, but once you learn it, it's like turning on a light in a dark room.

Hope this helped and have fun! It might be a little boring at first, but once you start getting better, it gets really fun! This is a great site, use it. If there's a technique you need help with, type it in the searchbar and you'll most likely get your answer.
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#10
You know lessons are dandy and all but if you know exactly would you're doing, then you don't need them. Most people don't, and that's understandable because there's a lot of things on guitar- a lot of concepts and techniques in various roadblocks. A while back I was stuck on my guitar process, I knew most chords, decent playing but didn't know what to do from there. A teacher would have helped but I didn't have one so half a year later I finally start to realize things I need to learn or do to advance my playing.

As a beginner I would recommend you learn some chords and strum patterns. Get a feel on the strum patterns rythm. Focus on your right hand technique a bit, pay attention to the dynamics- how hard you strum from beginning to end- nice and steady evenly. Smooth and not forced. Have control of your pick but not too much, let it glide in a somewhat perpendicular straight line from the strings. Make sure your hand is relaxed. If you focus on that, you'll end up with a nice sophisticated sound as you get better.

For chords, I would recommend you learning the open C, A, G, E, and D chords as well as Em, Am, and eventually Dm. The most important thing here is to learn how to fluently learn how to swap between chords as you play. This will take a while, a few months maybe but it's all good stuff. You learn strum patterns, the above chords and you're pretty much set for casual playing. You can play most songs just with those chords and a decent strum pattern. Learn how to sing and you could be one of those types on people on YouTube playing various covers on songs.

When you're pro at that, learn 2 barre chords- A and E. Also learn the Am and Em chord, it is pretty much the same thing but with one note changed. Congrats, you can play any song now with chords. Those 2 barre chords will allow you to play a voicing of every major and minor chord on the guitar.
#11
Quote by Andragon
Ah, the disputed topic. You have 2 paths, my son: Self-taught or Lessons.

Self-taught Pros:
Your own pace-your own songs to learn
Less Cost

Self-taught Cons:
Motivate yourself or no one will
Chance of picking up bad technique habits

Lessons Pros:
You have a good chance of learning techniques the proper way
Should be quicker to learn

Lessons Cons
:
Costs more
Sometimes hard to follow [however this depends on the teacher's teaching abilities].

Your choice now.


Or do both, which is what I did. Have a teacher teach you the basics, and the techniques, and apply them to your favourite songs at home.
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#12
Like the other poster said firstly learn open chords and then practice changing smoothly between them making sure you keep you strumming hand going.

Once you can do that then take a look at strumming pattens and a few songs.

This takes most people a few months to learn properly so don't worry if it seems hard work to begin with.
#13
As a beginner you can join Jamorama Acoustic guitar which is another creation from guitar master Ben Edwards. Jamorama Acoustic is aimed at the acoustic guitar player and is quite literally the acoustic version of Ben’s popular Jamorama! Guitar course that has lead the guitar learning market for the past several years.

If you want to learn guitar and are looking at an online course, I wholeheartedly recommend Jamorama Acoustic Guitar.
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Last edited by MasteringGuitar at Jul 14, 2009,
#14
learn the fundamentals... i can't stress that enough. scales, arpeggios and chords. learn them well and learn a lot of them. and it would probably be helpful to learn some theory with that instead of doing it like me. i learned all the patterns and shapes and just kind of figured **** out from there. you'll probably progress a little slower that way. my mechanics progressed quickly, but my understanding of what was going on stagnated for a while because i didn't know **** about theory.
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#15
Quote by MasteringGuitar
As a beginner you can join Jamorama Acoustic guitar which is another creation from guitar master Ben Edwards. Jamorama Acoustic is aimed at the acoustic guitar player and is quite literally the acoustic version of Ben’s popular Jamorama! Guitar course that has lead the guitar learning market for the past several years.

If you want to learn guitar and are looking at an online course, I wholeheartedly recommend Jamorama Acoustic Guitar.



I smell an ad.
#16
FIRST GET AN INSTRUCTOR, then learn some chords, the pentatonic and blues scale, then just find riffs you would like to play, look them up on youtube or ask your instructor to teach you, then start learning whole songs and solos.
#17
I'm mostly self-taught but I did have a teacher the first 6 months. I'd definately recommend getting a teacher, even if only for a few lessons, to get you pointed in the right direction. WIthout any instruction at all, its really easy to learn to play with bad technique, then have to spend ages later on correcting it.
#18
Get a teacher. Nobody will think you're hardcore for being self-taught when your technique sucks dick.
#19
You don't need a teacher to play guitar if you have the internet and a bit of time. If you want to avoid bad techniques and habbits, pay attention and do some digging. You can save yourself some money if you can read and take in to consideration what veteran guitar players offer in articles and lessons. There is plenty of material out there to sculpt you into a good guitar player, you just have to look and use some common sense.

Start very slow, be critical of yourself and understand that you need to watch your movements and be conscious of what you're doing as no one is there to do so for you. If you're really worried about technique, then record yourself playing, post it on youtube and then ask for tips from advanced players. Honestly though, there isn't much a teacher can tell you that you can't find out for yourself on the net.
You gotta put your faith in a loud guitar.