#1
im trying to learn scales but is confusing the hell out of me and i dont know if there is something i should be focusing first or not before getting into scales

the scale i know pretty damn well at the moment is the minor pentatonic scale. the reason i know it pretty well is because the patterns fit very nicely into each other and the patterns i learned it from a website but cant remember from where exactly

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php?qqq=FULL&scch=G&scchnam=Pentatonic+Minor&get2=Get&t=0&choice=1

but i have bunch of questions do i always have to start the scale from the root note? when i practice them? or it doesn't matter at all as long as i know the dots how they connect on the fretboard?

this stuff is confusing X_X

any help is appreciated
my guitar stuff:
ESP JH-600
ValveKing 112
DigiTech Whammy Pedal
Taylor 314CE
Dunlop SW-95 Slash Wah Pedal
Cordoba C7 Nylon String Acoustic Guitar
Metal muff
Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster Ash
#2
Well, as long as you play the notes, you play the scale. But the root note determines the mode.
For example, the A minor scale: A B C D E F G. Played A B C D E F G, it's the A minor scale. Played C D E F G A B ( and thus changing the intervals between the root note and the 2nd note, for example), you play the C major scale. Starting from the D note, D E F G A B C, you play the D major(?), Dorian mode.

Hope that helped, and if it's not 100% correct, sorry people. Not very good at this stuff.

EDIT:
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1042392
That thread has links to many useful other threads. Hope this helped.
Current gear:
Carvin CT6M
TC Electronics Dark Matter distortion
Harley Benton 2x12, with Celestion V30s
Laney Ironheart 60w tube amp
Last edited by LordPino at Jul 13, 2009,
#3
Ok, practicing scales isnt important untill you know what scales mean and what each note sounds like to the root or another note in the scale. Mindlessly practicing scales when u start learning guitar has little point. If you cant manage to memorize the pattern for a major scale then u havent been playing guitar for long enuff, just start with jamming with other songs and learn more about music. Then after youve been playing guitar for a while and you started getting good but ure peeking, thats when u wanna start learning ure theory. Its like language, u go to school and learn english howeveer before your in school you can form sentences and have small conversations (or jam with other ppl). Once you start learning scales it will come a lot easier to u because you will know a lot of the stuff through experience. Like if I go from a C to an E (major third) it will sound "happy" but then if i go to the Eb (minor 3rd) it will sound "sad"...
all thats just my opinion, but i think if you dont know the significance of a root your ear isnt trained enough
#4
Quote by stefan1988
the scale i know pretty damn well at the moment is the minor pentatonic scale. the reason i know it pretty well is because the patterns fit very nicely into each other and the patterns i learned it from a website but cant remember from where exactly

but i have bunch of questions do i always have to start the scale from the root note? when i practice them? or it doesn't matter at all as long as i know the dots how they connect on the fretboard?
Hi, first off - slight correction - you know how to play the scale pretty well, but I don't think you know the scale itself very well. Yet.

A scale is bascially a group of notes that fit together - you can play them in any order, starting wherever you like, and if you are playing it in the right context you will still be playing the same scale. Its also good to practice it in different patterns, as you'll rarely (if ever) play a scale straight up or down when you are using it to make music.

To understand scales, learn about the major scale - so you know it in terms of notes and intervals, as well as how to play it. Then learn how the minor scale and the pentatonic scales are related to it. Pretty much any other scale can be derived from the major scale, so once you understand that everything else gets a whole lot easier.

Take a look at the Music Theory FAQ. If that seems a bit complicated, watch Freepower's bitesize theory vids - they are on his profile
#5
I thought the Dorian mode was Minor. I'm just getting in to all this.
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#6
Quote by BladeSlinger
I thought the Dorian mode was Minor. I'm just getting in to all this.
Guys, give TS a break and quit talking about modes until he understand basic tonal stuff. All you're gonna do is confuse matters.


@BladeSlinger - not aiming that at you personally, yours was just the easiest post to quote.
#7
Quote by BladeSlinger
I thought the Dorian mode was Minor. I'm just getting in to all this.

Not to take this topic off track, but yes dorian is a minor mode.
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#8
Ok, practicing scales isnt important untill you know what scales mean and what each note sounds like to the root or another note in the scale. Mindlessly practicing scales when u start learning guitar has little point. If you cant manage to memorize the pattern for a major scale then u havent been playing guitar for long enuff, just start with jamming with other songs and learn more about music. Then after youve been playing guitar for a while and you started getting good but ure peeking, thats when u wanna start learning ure theory. Its like language, u go to school and learn english howeveer before your in school you can form sentences and have small conversations (or jam with other ppl). Once you start learning scales it will come a lot easier to u because you will know a lot of the stuff through experience. Like if I go from a C to an E (major third) it will sound "happy" but then if i go to the Eb (minor 3rd) it will sound "sad"...
all thats just my opinion, but i think if you dont know the significance of a root your ear isnt trained enough


i know some stuff about scales obviously i know is a group of notes
and i was learning the intervals like unison,minor second,major second,minor thid that sort of thing

but i still haven't developed that sort of hearing where can distinguish intervals besides the basic unison and octave and maybe the fith

i been playing guitar for a while like 4-5 years but i want to get more into the songwriting side of it so im trying to learns scales so i can solo over stuff

what would you guys recommend i should start working on then? before i try to tackle scales then?
my guitar stuff:
ESP JH-600
ValveKing 112
DigiTech Whammy Pedal
Taylor 314CE
Dunlop SW-95 Slash Wah Pedal
Cordoba C7 Nylon String Acoustic Guitar
Metal muff
Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster Ash
#9
Quote by stefan1988
what would you guys recommend i should start working on then?
Major scale. So you understand it in terms of intervals. Once you understand that all the other scales are relatively easy. Then learn to harmonise the major scale and you're into chord construction too. Easiest way to start writing your own stuff imho.
#10
Major scale. So you understand it in terms of intervals. Once you understand that all the other scales are relatively easy. Then learn to harmonise the major scale and you're into chord construction too. Easiest way to start writing your own stuff imho.


what do you mean by understand it in terms of interval?

do you mean as in Whole step, Whole step, Half step, Whole tone, Whole tone, Whole tone, half step formula thing?
my guitar stuff:
ESP JH-600
ValveKing 112
DigiTech Whammy Pedal
Taylor 314CE
Dunlop SW-95 Slash Wah Pedal
Cordoba C7 Nylon String Acoustic Guitar
Metal muff
Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster Ash
#11
That and recognising intervallic (is that a word?) structure in terms of Root, major2nd, major3rd, perfect4th etc (and how they sound).

Once you understand that, major pentatonic major is just the major scale with the 4th and 7th omitted.

Then learn how relative minors fit in and you know major, minor, maj pent and min pent. Add in a b5 and you can play a blues scale too etc
#12
That and recognising intervallic (is that a word?) structure in terms of Root, major2nd, major3rd, perfect4th etc (and how they sound).


i think i kind of understand what you saying but let me use an example to clarify lets say im using the C major scale which is

if im playing it from the 8th position
C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C

you mean the relation ship from C to D and from C to E and C to F? etc
i believe from C to D is major second
and from C to E is major third
From C to F is perfect fourth

so basically know the interval distance from C to each note?
and memorize how they sound?

is there something else i should learn?
my guitar stuff:
ESP JH-600
ValveKing 112
DigiTech Whammy Pedal
Taylor 314CE
Dunlop SW-95 Slash Wah Pedal
Cordoba C7 Nylon String Acoustic Guitar
Metal muff
Fender American Deluxe Stratocaster Ash
#13
Just that will keep you busy for a long time. Don't just memorize patterns. Memorize the notes on the fretboard and learn how to construct your own scales from that. There are 12 major scales, you'll be busy enough with those. Memorizing how they sound is harder than it sounds. Not only do you need to be able to recognize the intervals, but hear how they sound in your head before you play them.
#14
Quote by stefan1988
i think i kind of understand what you saying but let me use an example to clarify lets say im using the C major scale which is

if im playing it from the 8th position
C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C

you mean the relation ship from C to D and from C to E and C to F? etc
i believe from C to D is major second
and from C to E is major third
From C to F is perfect fourth

so basically know the interval distance from C to each note?
and memorize how they sound?

is there something else i should learn?
Yes to all that - except it doesn't matter what position you play it in. The distance between each degree of the scale will be the same wherever you play it.
#15
Quote by zhilla
That and recognising intervallic (is that a word?)

That is indeed a word! I remember using it in an essay for music class in high school, and my cretinous (is that a word?) teacher (who also didn't believe that minor pentatonic was a scale) told me to take it out because apparently, it wasn't a word. But it is