#1
How is tone divided? As in, what percents would you say are made of the different parts? I'm wondering if it's pretty even amongst the guitar, pickups, amp, eq settings, and pedals or if one or some of them override it all. Like, would a tone change more if you swapped amps or guitars? Is it all pretty equal?
#2
Silly question. You can't divide it that way.

In your example, you ask whether changing the guitar or amp will effect the tone more.
Well, change a super reverb out for a twin reverb, the tone will change very little. Swap it for a mesa, it will change a lot.

You're reducing irreducible things; you can't just call a guitar "x" because there's way more to it than that. There's a degree of change afforded by each modification, not some magical X<Y<Z formula.
#4
Quote by patbuck2
How is tone divided? As in, what percents would you say are made of the different parts? I'm wondering if it's pretty even amongst the guitar, pickups, amp, eq settings, and pedals or if one or some of them override it all. Like, would a tone change more if you swapped amps or guitars? Is it all pretty equal?


someone hasn't tried the searchbar....

Most important is the player, and amp makes a bigger difference in sound than the guitar and pickups and effects.
WTLTL 2011
#6
if this is being calculated i think pickups should be included within guitar and not as 2 separate things
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#7
Quote by Mark G

Most important is the player, and amp makes a bigger difference in sound than the guitar and pickups and effects.

That's what I thought... Yet, I remember when I played at my school's talent show I borrowed someone else's amp and I noticed the sound of my guitar could still be heard in there. I noticed that my guitar sounds kind of stiff(?). I can't think of any other word to describe it than stiff or confined or something like that... I've heard that in every amp I've tried with my guitar. I guess it all really depends on the specific person when it all comes down to it in the end.
#8
Quote by patbuck2
That's what I thought... Yet, I remember when I played at my school's talent show I borrowed someone else's amp and I noticed the sound of my guitar could still be heard in there. I noticed that my guitar sounds kind of stiff(?). I can't think of any other word to describe it than stiff or confined or something like that... I've heard that in every amp I've tried with my guitar. I guess it all really depends on the specific person when it all comes down to it in the end.


Give petrucci an MG and an epiphone goth and it'll sound like petrucci. Give a beginner a Bogner Uberschall and a PRS custom and he'll sound like a beginner.

Sure everything matters, from the strings and guitar to the amp and the player. Your guitar can make something sound stiff, but that's still only maybe 5% of the sound.
WTLTL 2011
#9
Quote by Mark G
Give petrucci an MG and an epiphone goth and it'll sound like petrucci. Give a beginner a Bogner Uberschall and a PRS custom and he'll sound like a beginner.

Sure everything matters, from the strings and guitar to the amp and the player. Your guitar can make something sound stiff, but that's still only maybe 5% of the sound.

True. I would say that probably the majority of a tone is in the hands of the person playing. Thanks for the feedback. UG is always a usefull learning tool for me.
#10
Quote by mmolteratx
I'd say:
40% Amp
20% Guitar
20% Signal Path
20% Technique

Technique doesn't add tonal quality's though!

65% of your tone is your amp. (Being the preamp/power-amp).
5% of your tone is the tubes.
10% of your tone is the speakers.
10% is your guitar.
10% are the acoustics and sound physics of the room you're in.

Pedals add to your tone quality, but it doesn't change it. (A JCM-800 with a Keeley 808 mod is still a JCM)
GEAR
Epiphone SG-400
Marshall 1987 JCM-800 2210 100W

Proud Member of:
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Last edited by Weeping_Demon7 at Jul 13, 2009,
#11
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
Technique doesn't add tonal quality's though!


No, it does. Your picking angle and attack have enormous effect on tone.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#12
Quote by Prophet of Page
No, it does. Your picking angle and attack have enormous effect on tone.

Not 20% of your sound is based on how you pick and attack your notes.
GEAR
Epiphone SG-400
Marshall 1987 JCM-800 2210 100W

Proud Member of:
The SG Owners Unite
Marshall Amplification
EHX Users Guild

The True Eccentric Tea Drinking Appreciation Preservation Society

#13
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
Technique doesn't add tonal quality's though!


I agree, technique adds your own flair to the music, but give Petrucci an MG and an epi goth and his tone will be crap, regardless of his skill.


Personally, talking STRICTLY tone:

PREAMP+POWERAMP (head): 65%
SPEAKER: 20%
PICKUPS: 5-10%
GUITAR: 5-9%


Or something like that anyways =P
100w Peavey Valveking Head
Mesa Rectifier 4x12 Standard Cab
Ibanez RG 321
Boss DD-7
iSP Decimator x2
BBE Boosta Grande
Modded Crybaby
MXR Blue Box
Numark Power Conditioner
Korg DTR-1000
#14
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
Not 20% of your sound is based on how you pick and attack your notes.


I personally don't think you can divide tone into percentages, but I really disagree. Pick attack has a huge effect, so do pick angle, where along the length of the string you pick and how you fret.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#15
Quote by Prophet of Page
I personally don't think you can divide tone into percentages, but I really disagree. Pick attack has a huge effect, so do pick angle, where along the length of the string you pick and how you fret.

On the way your tone sounds, but the sound itself, isn't majorly affected at all by how you pick.
GEAR
Epiphone SG-400
Marshall 1987 JCM-800 2210 100W

Proud Member of:
The SG Owners Unite
Marshall Amplification
EHX Users Guild

The True Eccentric Tea Drinking Appreciation Preservation Society

#17
Quote by Sguit
Ok guys, guitar his way more than 5-10% of your tone

Not really. The only noticeable difference are the pickups. Wood types are hard to distinguish unless you have a very good year for tone.
GEAR
Epiphone SG-400
Marshall 1987 JCM-800 2210 100W

Proud Member of:
The SG Owners Unite
Marshall Amplification
EHX Users Guild

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#18
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
Not really. The only noticeable difference are the pickups. Wood types are hard to distinguish unless you have a very good year for tone.


Well pickups make a huge difference, ok I know crappy thru good amp sounds goods, but the thing is that pickup is what determine the "base" of your tone and the amp determines the contour of it. I find kind of stupid that poeple devide it like, 20% guitar and 80% amp, because they both have very different effects on tone.
#19
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
On the way your tone sounds, but the sound itself, isn't majorly affected at all by how you pick.


Sorry, but that's just ignorance. How and where you pick fundementally affect which harmonics are present in a vibrating string, as well as how the harmonics decay. Those are tonal factors, and they are significant.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#20
Quote by Prophet of Page
Sorry, but that's just ignorance. How and where you pick fundementally affect which harmonics are present in a vibrating string, as well as how the harmonics decay. Those are tonal factors, and they are significant.

You're not getting what I'm saying. Those are factors of your playing, NOT YOUR TONE.

Quote by Sguit
Well pickups make a huge difference, ok I know crappy thru good amp sounds goods, but the thing is that pickup is what determine the "base" of your tone and the amp determines the contour of it. I find kind of stupid that poeple devide it like, 20% guitar and 80% amp, because they both have very different effects on tone.

Wrong, the guitar is a method for creating your sound, the amp is your sound.

Bold part holds true, however.
GEAR
Epiphone SG-400
Marshall 1987 JCM-800 2210 100W

Proud Member of:
The SG Owners Unite
Marshall Amplification
EHX Users Guild

The True Eccentric Tea Drinking Appreciation Preservation Society

#21
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
Not really. The only noticeable difference are the pickups. Wood types are hard to distinguish unless you have a very good year for tone.


I agree on the wood, but the construction of a guitar makes a difference.

Quote by Weeping_Demon7
You're not getting what I'm saying. Those are factors of your playing, NOT YOUR TONE.


How is adding/removing harmonics not changing your tone? This might be the dumbest thing I've ever read

Wrong, the guitar is a method for creating your sound, the amp is your sound.

Bold part holds true, however.



The guitar is the base of the tone, the sound you hear from the speakers is your guitar's signal being amplified.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#22
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
You're not getting what I'm saying. Those are factors of your playing, NOT YOUR TONE.


No, they are tonal factors and they are factors in your playing. If for no other reason than that your technique has a significant effect on equalisation (which it does), they are tonal factors.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#23
Quote by Kevin Saale
I agree on the wood, but the construction of a guitar makes a difference.


How is adding/removing harmonics not changing your tone? This might be the dumbest thing I've ever read


The guitar is the base of the tone, the sound you hear from the speakers is your guitar's signal being amplified.


But your amp IS the quality of your tone. By harmonics, he was referring to the pinch harmonics and natural harmonics, not overtones in your amp.
GEAR
Epiphone SG-400
Marshall 1987 JCM-800 2210 100W

Proud Member of:
The SG Owners Unite
Marshall Amplification
EHX Users Guild

The True Eccentric Tea Drinking Appreciation Preservation Society

#25
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
But your amp IS the quality of your tone. By harmonics, he was referring to the pinch harmonics and natural harmonics, not overtones in your amp.



No, I was talking about the overtones present on the string.
My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#26
Quote by Weeping_Demon7
But your amp IS the quality of your tone.


What?

By harmonics, he was referring to the pinch harmonics and natural harmonics, not overtones in your amp.



Even still you can get more bass or more treble depending where you pick. I play my BJr cranked and I can get a plethora of tones just by altering my pick attack. Are you honestly gonna tell me going from clean to overdriven by adjusting my pick attack is not changing the tone? Accept it, you're wrong.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#27
i agree with weeping demon, technique and harmonics are part of your sound, but not your tone. Tone itself is what doesnt vary between players, its the sound of the rig itself.
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#28
Quote by AC/DC4EVA
i agree with weeping demon, technique and harmonics are part of your sound, but not your tone. Tone itself is what doesnt vary between players, its the sound of the rig itself.

you're kidding right? My sarcasm detector is broken today