#1
i got one o these, acoustic electric


what are my options for lowering it on the bridge side?? the action is killing me
#2
Well it all depends on how much you can much you can take off of your saddle. Also depends on whether it's neck is aligned properly with the bridge (it should be). If you've never done this sort of thing take it to a tech to have it done, especially with a bass. The saddle is where the majority of volume is produced, if it isn't cut right it could give you an uneven volume or frequency response. Not to mention your pick-up is underneath the saddle, If the saddle is not in tight contact with Pick-up bad things can happen there too.

If you are dead set about doing it yourself, there is something you can try. The next time you change strings pull your saddle out gently with just your fingers. Use a toothpick to carefully lift up your Pick-up, don't pull it out too far. If there is a sliver of plastic over the pick-up, your can remove that, it's a factory shim. take it out and drop your Pick-up back down into place, put the saddle back on and change strings normally. If there is no shim, then stop and change your strings normally. If the saddle doesn't want to come out with your finger, then stop and change your strings normally. If the pick-up doesn't want to come out, then stop and change your strings normally.

Sometimes the action on a production model is lower than "spec", but factory "spec" is just a number, so the put something in to raise the saddle, a Shim. You can remove the shim if there is one to lower your action. If there is no shim then pack it up to take to the guitar tech. Don't do anything that might endanger your instrument. Mountain climbers have a saying, "The peak is Optional, going home is Mandatory." Applies here too, Saddle adjustment from a tech $20 tops, New Saddle looking at about $20 for the part, and about $60 in labor. Saddle adjustment, overnight, new saddle about a week.

James
#3
you see that big ass wooden thing?? the saddle sits on top of that...it's like 2 inches off the body
so a tech is the only option??
i don't wanna mess it up, never owned an acoustic in my life
#4
filing down the string saddle on the bridge and nut is your only option
if you have never done it take it to a luthier or you will be sorry.
Founding Member and President of UG Geezer Guild
#5
You see that big ass wooden thing under your fret board. The bridge is the your "big ass wooden thing". It's height is determined by the height of the neck, my "big ass wooden thing", on the other side of the sound hole. The Bridge should be as high as the crown of your last fret.

Plus you don't measure the action by how far the bridge is from the body. Also the amount of adjustment that would be needed is probably allot smaller than you think. Acoustics sound better with a higher action, so they aren't designed to go as low as electrics.

And yes, a Tech is your only option.

James
#6
Quote by SoundManMike
filing down the string saddle on the bridge and nut is your only option
if you have never done it take it to a luthier or you will be sorry.



Yup

also keep in mind that an acoustic bass needs higher action than an electric because the strings have to vibrate harder to produce enough volume. That means that it's possible that your super high action is something you just need to deal with simply because acoustic bass guitars need super high action.
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#7
sorry, the action on this thing is not normal...it's unplayable, fretting takes an insane amount of effort

& i'm not talking about how far the bridge is, it's how high...it's 2 inches high, absolutely insane. the damn thing doesn't need to be that high to vibrate
#8
Quote by CorduroyEW
Yup

also keep in mind that an acoustic bass needs higher action than an electric because the strings have to vibrate harder to produce enough volume. That means that it's possible that your super high action is something you just need to deal with simply because acoustic bass guitars need super high action.

I do agree that acoustic bass guitars do require a high action however I have seen lots of the low end models with insanely high actions that do require a good setup out of the box.
Founding Member and President of UG Geezer Guild
#9
I think you misunderstood, how height, how high the bridge is, corresponds to the height, how high the crown (the very top) of the last fret. You don't mess with the bridge to adjust the action. It's either saddle or neck.

The Bridge anchors the strings to the body, if it isn't heavy enough the strings will pull right through the top. Not sure of the tension of bass strings but I'm sure it's a pretty intense amount of pressure.

James