#1
I want to be able to send my dotted 8th through two amps, like a ping pong delay like the edge. right now the best i can do with my dl4 and dd5 is run the dd5 into the dl4 and then send it to both amps through the two output channels in the back of the dl4. but the thing is that i have to get both delays pretty much exactly on the same tempo for it to work right without it getting really muddy and off. I don't want to have to do a tap dance up there all the time, so is there a better way to do this?

i thought about getting the dd7 instead, if it has the ability to split the dotted 8th into two amps like a ping pong. does it have this fucntion? is there another pedal i should look at? thanks guys
#2
Quote by skynyrdkoku1
I want to be able to send my dotted 8th through two amps, like a ping pong delay like the edge. right now the best i can do with my dl4 and dd5 is run the dd5 into the dl4 and then send it to both amps through the two output channels in the back of the dl4. but the thing is that i have to get both delays pretty much exactly on the same tempo for it to work right without it getting really muddy and off. I don't want to have to do a tap dance up there all the time, so is there a better way to do this?

i thought about getting the dd7 instead, if it has the ability to split the dotted 8th into two amps like a ping pong. does it have this fucntion? is there another pedal i should look at? thanks guys


not sure if this works with your budget, but the easy answer is to pick up a rack unit like a lexicon LM300 (for example... this is what i use) that has a built in ping-pong delay. no guess work. set your patch, and you're golden everytime you go to it. you can even dial it in with note values (well, the rate/tempo ne-ways).

another way would be to split your signal and run one delay into either amp, one with an 8th delay, the other with a dotted 8th for the edge style 16th ping-pong. watch your tempos... if you can't store them, this could be a MAJOR pain in the ass.

another option would be to run the delays in series, with the first delay having a longer (rate, not feedback) delay than the 2nd, into one amp (or stereo, but it won't give you a true ping-pong either way). adjust the mix level of both delays so that one is noticibly more than the other (some like the first delay with more mix, some the 2nd... decide for yourself). this is really the poorman's "pseudo-stereo ping-pong," but it works alright and certainly has its own uniqueness.

EDIT: just hit me like a ton of bricks (and now i feel dumb for not seeing it while i was typing out the stuff earlier)...

one of your delays has stereo outs! that delay comes first, one output straight to the amp (or other fx, reverb, gate, you get it), the 2nd output goes into the other delay. the 2nd delay goes to the 2nd amp. adjust the rates to taste, just do the math to see how they'll align, and don't forget that the signal feeding the 2nd delay will be delayed itself (unless you have a dry output... in which case, use that). a good place to start is with the 2nd delay at the dotted value of the first with less mix than the first (and use a big note, like a dotted whole or something, just to get started).

hope these help.
Last edited by GrisKy at Jul 14, 2009,
#3
Quote by GrisKy
not sure if this works with your budget, but the easy answer is to pick up a rack unit like a lexicon LM300 (for example... this is what i use) that has a built in ping-pong delay. no guess work. set your patch, and you're golden everytime you go to it. you can even dial it in with note values (well, the rate/tempo ne-ways).

another way would be to split your signal and run one delay into either amp, one with an 8th delay, the other with a dotted 8th for the edge style 16th ping-pong. watch your tempos... if you can't store them, this could be a MAJOR pain in the ass.

another option would be to run the delays in series, with the first delay having a longer (rate, not feedback) delay than the 2nd, into one amp (or stereo, but it won't give you a true ping-pong either way). adjust the mix level of both delays so that one is noticibly more than the other (some like the first delay with more mix, some the 2nd... decide for yourself). this is really the poorman's "pseudo-stereo ping-pong," but it works alright and certainly has its own uniqueness.

EDIT: just hit me like a ton of bricks (and now i feel dumb for not seeing it while i was typing out the stuff earlier)...

one of your delays has stereo outs! that delay comes first, one output straight to the amp (or other fx, reverb, gate, you get it), the 2nd output goes into the other delay. the 2nd delay goes to the 2nd amp. adjust the rates to taste, just do the math to see how they'll align, and don't forget that the signal feeding the 2nd delay will be delayed itself (unless you have a dry output... in which case, use that). a good place to start is with the 2nd delay at the dotted value of the first with less mix than the first (and use a big note, like a dotted whole or something, just to get started).

hope these help.

i was totally amazed by this thorough answer, but then i realized it's my buddy grisky. it's good to see you playing nice for once. try not to make anybody cry.

@TS i would take this advice as gold, it was pretty much what i was ready to type up.
#4
If that doesn't work, there is an entire website devoted to The Edge's delay in songs including a rig diagram as well as tabs/sound clips of delay for nearly every song it can be heard on.
#5
Quote by gumbilicious
i was totally amazed by this thorough answer, but then i realized it's my buddy grisky. it's good to see you playing nice for once. try not to make anybody cry.

@TS i would take this advice as gold, it was pretty much what i was ready to type up.



I appreciate the vote of confidence bro!

also, Leader: that's awesome that that's available. giving the web addresss would totally earn you a "+1".