Page 1 of 2
#4
I don't realy understand your question. Tabs are simply a notational system for the guitar. Theory encompasses many things
GENERATION 10: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig on any forum and add 1 to the generation. Social experiment.
#6
the question makes no sense. tabs are nothing to do with composition...

do you mean is it easier to write down music in tab or standard notation when you are composing?
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#7
Standard notation and staff both have their pros and cons if thats definetly what you mean
GENERATION 10: The first time you see this, copy it into your sig on any forum and add 1 to the generation. Social experiment.
#8
@turtlewax: Standard notation IS notated on a staff

Standard notation has everything tab has, and more! You can easily convey your ideas to musicians other than guitarists with standard notation. Also, you can precisely notate time signature, key signature, rhythmic value, dynamic changes, accents, really everything. The only thing that you could say tab has better than standard notation is the fact you can notate exactly where to play something on the fretboard. But this could easily be fixed on standard notation with a simple note above the notes on the staff (i.e. "Play on D, G, and B strings.")

tl;dr - Standard notation is more useful in every way.
#9
From a compositional standpoint standard notation is better. Tabs cant indicate exact rthym or key signatures.
*lust list*
Vox tone lab
Vox ac50
satchurator
satches time machine
vintage phase 90
Money towards this gear = $0.00

Quote by Doctor Matthews
Yeah I dreamt I was fighting Master Hand, but then I woke up to realize I was jackin' it in my sleep.
#10
Quote by Soul Power1111
Which is better on a compositional standpoint, not technical.

apples and oranges..... not comparable.

One is a field of study
one is a form of notation

They are what they are. Realize that and then make appropriate use of them.
shred is gaudy music
#12
Quote by Soul Power1111
im asking would it be better to know theory if i wanted to become a good musician


Yes. If all you're doing is reading tab, you're not progressing, you're just playing what it tells you to play. I suggest you read "The Crusade" articles in the Column section of this site.
#13
Quote by Soul Power1111
im asking would it be better to know theory if i wanted to become a good musician


Well, you'll certainly become a more educated musician.

The real question is........ are you interested in theory?

if so, start studying.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 14, 2009,
#14
i have played guitar for around 4 years and i only use tabs, i find it hard to write my own songs, would theory help me with my that, or is my problem just writers block?
#15
Quote by Soul Power1111
i have played guitar for around 4 years and i only use tabs, i find it hard to write my own songs, would theory help me with my that, or is my problem just writers block?

im not gonna say one way or the other if theory would help you (it definitely cant hurt) but i will say i was writing songs after only a couple of months of playing and i definitely didn't know squat.
#16
why does something always have to trump something else? why can't you take them both for what they are and use them as needed to create the style you're after?
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
#17
Theory gives you the understanding of what sounds good together and why - so yes it would help you write your own songs. I don't believe I have a creative bone in my body, but even I can write my own stuff by utilising my own measly knowledge of theory.
#18
Quote by zhilla
Theory gives you the understanding of what sounds good together and why - so yes it would help you write your own songs. I don't believe I have a creative bone in my body, but even I can write my own stuff by utilising my own measly knowledge of theory.


im pretty much on hte same page as u



Quote by Gunpowder
Thrashturbating? Most metal of all ways to pleasure oneself.
#19
You compose using your ear. Theory helps you transcribe what your hear into musical notes. Tabs has nothing to do with this.
Quote by thsrayas
Why did women get multiple orgasms instead of men? I want a river of semen flowing out of my room to mark my territory.

You can play a shoestring if you're sincere
- John Coltrane
#20
Quote by Soul Power1111
i have played guitar for around 4 years and i only use tabs, i find it hard to write my own songs, would theory help me with my that, or is my problem just writers block?


Well, there are lots of possible reasons.

If you've just been learning from tabs, then you haven't spent much time developing your ear. This could also be a big reason as to why your unable to write. You have to develop an aural connection.

Tell me this. Can you play very many songs by memory, or do you need to pull out the ol' tab book in order to play something? This is very important. You need to internalize music, if you expect to create any yourself. If it's not in your head, you really don't have much to work with.

So, would learning theory be beneficial? For sure, learning stuff is always good

is it going to cure your "writers block"..... no guarantees, but it will give you more to work with.

You seem interested enough. Why don't you just go ahead and start studying. and along with that (this is really important)..... start LISTENING. Learning from tab's got ya started. now start using your ears/brain.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 14, 2009,
#21
Quote by Soul Power1111
i have played guitar for around 4 years and i only use tabs, i find it hard to write my own songs, would theory help me with my that, or is my problem just writers block?


learn your theory.

theres no way around it.

you'll suck forever if you dont learn theory and do some ear training.

just the harsh reality.
#22
Quote by ShoeFactory
learn your theory.

theres no way around it.

you'll suck forever if you dont learn theory and do some ear training.

just the harsh reality.


kinda true. you have to know *some* theory at least.
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
#23
Quote by ShoeFactory
learn your theory.

theres no way around it.

you'll suck forever if you dont learn theory and do some ear training.

just the harsh reality.



^ Not true.

There are plenty of factors in "sucking forever"..... theory is helpful, but not necessarily the cure.

Quote by konfyouzd
kinda true. you have to know *some* theory at least.


Not really. You don't HAVE to know any theory. It really just comes down to what you want to do.

if you WANT to ..... you should.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 14, 2009,
#24
Quote by GuitarMunky

Not really. You don't HAVE to know any theory. It really just comes down to what you want to do.

if you WANT to ..... you should.


kind of impossible to play an instrument w/o knowing some theory. i'm not saying you have to be a theory encyclopedia but once you get to a certain point in your playing you know some theory regardless... there are a lot of guys that can do things well beyond what they can explain with theory but they know *some* theory.

i never studied theory but i figured certain things out just by playing. and eventually you meet other guitarists that will explain bits and pieces of it to you.

at least that's how it worked for me. i learned some patterns and then i figured out how they interlocked with each other and then i found out which ones sound good together. somewhere down the line someone ended up explaining to me briefly how they work together. i now know *some* theory but still couldn't explain it if asked to do so.
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
#25
Quote by konfyouzd
kind of impossible to play an instrument w/o knowing some theory. i'm not saying you have to be a theory encyclopedia but once you get to a certain point in your playing you know some theory regardless... there are a lot of guys that can do things well beyond what they can explain with theory but they know *some* theory.

i never studied theory but i figured certain things out just by playing. and eventually you meet other guitarists that will explain bits and pieces of it to you.

at least that's how it worked for me. i learned some patterns and then i figured out how they interlocked with each other and then i found out which ones sound good together. somewhere down the line someone ended up explaining to me briefly how they work together. i now know *some* theory but still couldn't explain it if asked to do so.



It's entirely possible to play an instrument without knowing theory. Been done many times before.

Anyway, I know what your trying to say. You do tend to pick up general knowledge through experience. Just be careful not to confuse general knowledge for theory. Knowing a scale pattern or even a scale name or key signature, doesn't really constitute theory.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 14, 2009,
#26
Quote by GuitarMunky
It's entirely possible to play an instrument without knowing theory. Been done many times before.

Anyway, I know what your trying to say. You do tend to pick up general knowledge through experience. Just be careful not to confuse general knowledge for theory. Knowing a scale pattern or even a scale name or key signature, doesn't really constitute theory.


One could argue that people who have become good players without theory actually do know theory, in the fact that they still have those relationships between notes, patterns, why X goes with Y, etc. etc., they have all that internalized. Not theory in the sense that the world understands it, but it's like their own personal theory.
#27
Quote by GuitarMunky
It's entirely possible to play an instrument without knowing theory. Been done many times before.

Anyway, I know what your trying to say. You do tend to pick up general knowledge through experience. Just be careful not to confuse general knowledge for theory. Knowing a scale pattern or even a scale name or key signature, doesn't really constitute theory.


ok fair enough. that makes sense. then i have a mixture of bits and pieces of theory and general knowledge.
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
#28
Quote by timeconsumer09
One could argue that people who have become good players without theory actually do know theory, in the fact that they still have those relationships between notes, patterns, why X goes with Y, etc. etc., they have all that internalized. Not theory in the sense that the world understands it, but it's like their own personal theory.


that works too. i think that's more along the lines of what i was thinking.
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
#29
Quote by timeconsumer09
One could argue that people who have become good players without theory actually do know theory, in the fact that they still have those relationships between notes, patterns, why X goes with Y, etc. etc., they have all that internalized. Not theory in the sense that the world understands it, but it's like their own personal theory.


Sure, you could argue just about anything.

I would argue that when people use the term theory, they are talking about the formal field of study (like what's taught in the classroom), not an individual making their own sense of the relationships based on their own experience.

I mean if you want to view them as being the same there would be no reason to ever advocate learning theory because ...... there's no need to study it, you learn it simply by playing & listening to music. While that does bring up an interesting point, I think that a person that advocates learning theory is concerned with formal study.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 14, 2009,
#30
Quote by GuitarMunky
Sure, you could argue just about anything.

I would argue that when people use the term theory, they are talking about the formal field of study (like what's taught in the classroom), not an individual making their own sense of the relationships based on their own experience.

I mean if you want to view them as being the same there would be no reason to ever advocate learning theory because ...... there's no need to study it, you learn it simply by playing & listening to music. While that does bring up an interesting point, I think that a person that advocates learning theory is concerned with formal study.


yea that makes sense. but there are a lot of really blurry lines in theory that you eventually end up having to make sense of for yourself anyway some of the time i think. hell... maybe you can clear these up for me now, though.

there's a clear distinction between polymeter and polyrhythms by definition. but sometimes when people play the line between the two can be blurred depending on how you look at a particular piece of music. and i still don't know what the hell hemiola is because every time someone explains it to me it ends up sounding like the definition for either polymeter or a polyrhythm.

i think that may have gone off a bit on a slightly off topic tangent. more relevant. i don't think that just because someone doesn't know theory in depth and what they know--to you--is general knowledge, doesn't mean that they're playing guitar without knowing theory.

and i wouldn't really say that what you can learn by wanking around in your room vs what you can learn through theory training is one in the same. it'd be absurd to believe so. i think a lot of the basics you can figure out or get second hand from most people through experience. the more complex stuff would definitely need to be studied but i don't know if it's always necessary to go that deep. that's probably something to be determined on a person to person basis.

i have a fairly solid knowledge of a lot of the basics (although i couldn't explain them in music theory terms to save my life) and i venture into the more complex stuff if there's something i'm looking to incorporate into something i'm working on. but for the most part i have absolutely no interest in formal music theory training simply because i think some people allow that to govern their musical choices once they've learned it.

i've found that the less i think about stuff the better it tends to turn out. that's just me, though.
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
Last edited by konfyouzd at Jul 14, 2009,
#31
Quote by GuitarMunky
Sure, you could argue just about anything.

I would argue that when people use the term theory, they are talking about the formal field of study (like what's taught in the classroom), not an individual making their own sense of the relationships based on their own experience.

I mean if you want to view them as being the same there would be no reason to ever advocate learning theory because ...... there's no need to study it, you learn it simply by playing & listening to music. While that does bring up an interesting point, I think that a person that advocates learning theory is concerned with formal study.


I wasn't trying to say they're the same. I was more trying to say that even though they don't know conventional theory, they're not just randomly wanking on the fretboard, either.
#32
Quote by zhilla
Theory gives you the understanding of what sounds good together and why - so yes it would help you write your own songs. I don't believe I have a creative bone in my body, but even I can write my own stuff by utilising my own measly knowledge of theory.

This.

Minus the creative part, I'm actually quite creative in my music.

But if you're stuck in a song or trying to solo, theory would really help.
Quote by Zinnie
god placed the fossils in earth to confuse the humans into thinking that earth is older than it actually is, therefore, making men try and think outside the box....

just kidding, there is no god



www.youtube.com/user/andrew12398
#34
Quote by timeconsumer09
. I was more trying to say that even though they don't know conventional theory, they're not just randomly wanking on the fretboard, either.


that's what I'm saying.
shred is gaudy music
#35
i have played guitar for around 4 years and i only use tabs, i find it hard to write my own songs, would theory help me with my that, or is my problem just writers block?


It is not writers block. By learning only from tab you are neither training your ears (what learning from just ear will do) or training your analytical and interpretive/imaginative skills (what sheet music will do).

My advice, ditch tab and start learning by both ear and sheet music.
#38
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
its still theory though. you can change the definitions but the concepts will always be the same. theory is just how we explain and understand music.



I'm not changing any definitions.

"Music theory is the field of study that deals with how music works. It examines the language and notation of music. It identifies patterns that govern composers' techniques. "


And well, I'll just quote myself....

Quote by GuitarMunky


I would argue that when people use the term theory, they are talking about the formal field of study (like what's taught in the classroom), not an individual making their own sense of the relationships based on their own experience.

I mean if you want to view them as being the same there would be no reason to ever advocate learning theory because ...... there's no need to study it, you learn it simply by playing & listening to music. While that does bring up an interesting point, I think that a person that advocates learning theory is concerned with formal study.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 14, 2009,
#39
what you're missing in theory, you will have to make up with a TON of ear training.

and even then, if you have no theory, you cannot communicate your ideas to other musicians.

like timeconsumer said, those that do not formally learn theory have to, in a way, reinvent theory for themselves through experience and internalize it. this is a slow process but it can be done.

there is no reason not to learn theory in your formal sense, as it is faster.
Last edited by ShoeFactory at Jul 14, 2009,
#40
Quote by GuitarMunky
Sure, you could argue just about anything.

I would argue that when people use the term theory, they are talking about the formal field of study (like what's taught in the classroom), not an individual making their own sense of the relationships based on their own experience.

I mean if you want to view them as being the same there would be no reason to ever advocate learning theory because ...... there's no need to study it, you learn it simply by playing & listening to music. While that does bring up an interesting point, I think that a person that advocates learning theory is concerned with formal study.

I would argue that the majority of people on this board aren't referring to formal study at all - I certainly wouldn't class anything I've done musically as "formal".

Theory is anything to do with music convention and terminology, that can be as simple as learning some of the notes on the fretboard, if you've done that then you've learned some theory - a lot of people never even get that far and simply blindly follow tabs.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
Page 1 of 2