#1
I just bought a fender mexican standard strat. I noticed when i do string bends, the bridge does move a bit. I know its not a double locking one because i have an ibanez rg with a double locking trem system. I was just wondering how the whole system worked in this strat.
#2
im pretty sure to correct the moving bridge you have to either tighten or loosen the springs on the underside of the guitar behind the plate
#3
Quote by bellamy_morello
im pretty sure to correct the moving bridge you have to either tighten or loosen the springs on the underside of the guitar behind the plate

so then its not supposed to be floating then. ok i'll start adjusting...
#5
as long as the bridge is parallel to the rest of the guitar body i just looked at pictures of standard strats and i dont think that its a dual pivoting bridge, i have a crappy squire standard strat and my bridge pivots both ways im sorry if im confusing you, could you post some pics of your bridge, then i could tell you exactly what you should do
#6
Quote by bellamy_morello
as long as the bridge is parallel to the rest of the guitar body i just looked at pictures of standard strats and i dont think that its a dual pivoting bridge, i have a crappy squire standard strat and my bridge pivots both ways im sorry if im confusing you, could you post some pics of your bridge, then i could tell you exactly what you should do

I got it. I have one question: In the back plate, how tight are the screws in the back supposed to go in? On my ibanez, the wood stripped in the back and the screws came out and i had to get it repaired. Theres about 3/4 inches between the guitar and the metal piece attatching it to the bridge. I dont want to tighten the screws to much to strip the wood but it didnt come with an extra spring.
#8
does it have a whammy? That might have something to do with it?
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#9
Quote by bellamy_morello
dont tighten the screws that much, just enough so they will hold the plate on

no lol i meant the screws that tighten and loosen the springs
#10
With a vintage style vibrato bridge like those found on Strats, there is no 'right' way to set them up. It's all personal preference.

Some people like to have the back of the bridge raised off the body, by up to about 1/8th of an inch. This allows you to pull up on the bridge to raise pitch a little and the lower spring tension will give quicker and smooth dive action, but it will also hurt sustain and the tuning stability will go right out the window. It will also mean the bridge will move whenever doing any normal bend, which throws all the strings out of tune while you're bending. This is basically the same as a Floyd Rose (or other double locking vibrato) works, but since it's not locking it has worse tuning stability. Generally most people avoid this method since if you want to raise pitch and have smoother dive action then you'd get a Floyd, not a vintage vibrato which isn't intended to do heavy whammy antics.

Other people like to have the bridge completely parallel with the body. This increases sustain and tuning stability, but your dive range is more restricted and you can't pull up at all. If the spring tension is high enough it is possible to still be able to push the bar down but still have the bridge stable enough that it won't move when doing normal bends. This is how most people have Strat vibratos set up as it offers the best of both worlds; good tone, good sustain, good tuning stability, no restrictions on normal playability and can still do light dipping vibrato, which is what the Strat vibrato was designed for.

The third common way of setting up these bridges is to tighten the springs all the way, block off the bridge with extra wood in the back, or add in an extra spring or two to increase the spring tension so much the bridge will never move, effectively making the guitar a hardtail. This won't go out of tune and sustains much better, but it does mean you can't use the bridge as a vibrato at all.



Personally, I prefer to tighten the springs all the way and block off the bridge. I simply value tuning stability and sustain more than any vibrato feature, which I wouldn't use anyway. But to each his own.

For what it's worth, there's no set rule for how far the screws should be in, how many springs you use, etc etc. It all depends on getting the balance right with the string gauge you use and the scale length of the guitar.
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#11
Quote by MrFlibble
With a vintage style vibrato bridge like those found on Strats, there is no 'right' way to set them up. It's all personal preference.

Some people like to have the back of the bridge raised off the body, by up to about 1/8th of an inch. This allows you to pull up on the bridge to raise pitch a little and the lower spring tension will give quicker and smooth dive action, but it will also hurt sustain and the tuning stability will go right out the window. It will also mean the bridge will move whenever doing any normal bend, which throws all the strings out of tune while you're bending. This is basically the same as a Floyd Rose (or other double locking vibrato) works, but since it's not locking it has worse tuning stability. Generally most people avoid this method since if you want to raise pitch and have smoother dive action then you'd get a Floyd, not a vintage vibrato which isn't intended to do heavy whammy antics.

Other people like to have the bridge completely parallel with the body. This increases sustain and tuning stability, but your dive range is more restricted and you can't pull up at all. If the spring tension is high enough it is possible to still be able to push the bar down but still have the bridge stable enough that it won't move when doing normal bends. This is how most people have Strat vibratos set up as it offers the best of both worlds; good tone, good sustain, good tuning stability, no restrictions on normal playability and can still do light dipping vibrato, which is what the Strat vibrato was designed for.

The third common way of setting up these bridges is to tighten the springs all the way, block off the bridge with extra wood in the back, or add in an extra spring or two to increase the spring tension so much the bridge will never move, effectively making the guitar a hardtail. This won't go out of tune and sustains much better, but it does mean you can't use the bridge as a vibrato at all.



Personally, I prefer to tighten the springs all the way and block off the bridge. I simply value tuning stability and sustain more than any vibrato feature, which I wouldn't use anyway. But to each his own.

For what it's worth, there's no set rule for how far the screws should be in, how many springs you use, etc etc. It all depends on getting the balance right with the string gauge you use and the scale length of the guitar.

What is the limit on tightening the screws in the back without having to add an extra spring?