#1
Alright, I know in the melodic minor scale you play it with the 6th and 7th note raised a half step, and going down you play the regular minor scale... However, how would you use this say, improvising or in a solo?

Also, would I have to stay in the same scale pattern for every motion of my fingers? (i.e., when ascending, only play the ascending? what about trills or legato?)

I know my question may sound confusing, but just thinking about this scale, it seems impractical for such a thing as improvising and soloing... I'm wondering how and if it can be done, or if I'm just an idiot and all it takes it a little practice to keep the scale in mind
#2
When you're targeting the tonic with an ascending run use the melodic minor. This makes use of a nice smooth run and gives the strong melodic half step resolve when you move from the leading tone and arrive at the tonic.

When you're descending away from the tonic you don't need the same half step melodic resolution (since you're not "arriving" on the tonic but departing from it) so you revert to the standard natural minor scale.

It's just a technique composers noticed sounded really good. You don't have to use it. But if you want to, a little practice and you should be fine.
Si
#3
well, I'm saying I understand that part... I just meant as far as going up and down the scale, or just. I guess I see if you don't have to use it, but I just started thinking of applying this to my playing, and thinking about the fact that it is different ascending versus descending, ti seems complicated if you wanted to improvise or whatnot. Only being able to play certain notes going up and not down?
#4
The idea is that you'll internalize it. Hopefully you'll eventually be familiar enough with the way it SOUNDS to know if it fits over what you're doing. Remember, scales weren't "created" so much as "discovered". Scales are essentially a set of intervals commonly found to coexist.
#5
I think people should forget about the whole acsending/descending business associated with the melodic minor scale, particularly when talking about improvising. It's just a convention and should really be called what it actually is: Melodic minor ascending, natural minor descending. In reality a scale which is different ascending than descending is two different scales. This is how you should think of it.

If a musician these days asks you to improvise with the melodic minor scale, it's almost certain that he means to use the major scale with a b3, or the "ascending version".
#7
You should never be limiting yourself to one scale while soloing. Really, play the notes that sound good when they sound good, don't get caught up overthinking the scales, they were made to help composers more than improvisers.
#9
Quote by SKAtastic7770
You should never be limiting yourself to one scale while soloing. Really, play the notes that sound good when they sound good, don't get caught up overthinking the scales, they were made to help composers more than improvisers.


That's totally opposite end of his question though. Also, whats the point in being purely a musician if you don't want to write music ultimately?
#10
Actually the lowering of the 6th and 7th when descending is not set in stone and different musicians do it either way.
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#11
what Ive heard is that in classical you descend differently than you ascend and in jazz you just leave the 6th and 7th and natural either way I wouldn't worry about it
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