#1
I've been playing for a year and a half but have never looked into theory at all. Looking to develop my knowledge but have come to a massive stumbling block as far as chords are concerned.

On different sites I'm getting different lessons on what a chord is.

1) F#o |x|4|5|x|

Does this mean that these two notes played together make an F chord??

2) Diagram below - does this mean the individual marked frets are the chords?? (eg. is the first fret on the E string and F chord??)



3) F
G|--2-|
D|--3-| Does this mean all three notes played at the same time make an F chord??
A|----|
E|--1-|

4) Or is the F chord played like they show in this video??

Would appreciate any help, cause I'm getting mixed advice from everyone I ask, thanks
#2
2) those are the notes. the first fret on the E string is an F

3) if you reference the diagram you posted, you see that those notes translate to an F, an F an octave above, and then an A, so i guess yes it is a chord with notes in the F major scale

i can't answer 1 because i'm not sure what lxl is, and i can't answer 4 because my laptop speakers are so bad i can't hear anything he's playing
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Yay fibonacci!
#3
The video is a lesson on arpeggios not chords. An arpeggio is basically taking a chord and playing each note individually (like a sweep or what the video shows), as opposed to at the same time (like strumming a chord).

Arpaggios usually constitute the triad which is the root, 3rd, and 5th.
no sig for joo
#4
okay so a chord is made up of at least 3 notes. the root the 3rd (above the root) and the 5th (above the root) make your basic triad (triad meaning 3 different notes). normal triads have 4 forms, also known as qualities. they are major, minor, diminished, and augmented.

1) im not entirely sure that this is the case, but usually the "o" or "degree" sign by a chord means that it is a diminished chord (lowered 3rd and 5th). assuming the "x" means to mute or not play the string then the 4th fret on the A string (a C#) and the 5th fret on the D string (a G) just makes what is called a tritone and NOT an F# diminished chord

2) as stated this picture is just showing you the notes on the fretboard

3) yes that makes an F major chord. in that figure you have the root, octave, and major 3rd. a full F major triad would be F (root), A(major 3rd), and C (5th)

hopefully this clears some things up for you! i understand that you might not be familiar with some of the terminology i have used, but im more then happy to answer any questions you may have!
#5
Quote by dr.willhopefully
this clears some things up for you! i understand that you might not be familiar with some of the terminology i have used, but im more then happy to answer any questions you may have!


Still not sure what a 3rd a 5th or a root is.
#6
Quote by Libertine..
Still not sure what a 3rd a 5th or a root is.


you might want to get a theory book or look on the internet, it'll be good for you

If you're playing an F major scale, then the root note is F. the third of that is two scale degrees up - the root, F, is scale degree 1, next is G, and then the third is A. and then the fifth is another two, which makes it C
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Yay fibonacci!
#7
Quote by capslockisnton
you might want to get a theory book or look on the internet, it'll be good for you

If you're playing an F major scale, then the root note is F. the third of that is two scale degrees up - the root, F, is scale degree 1, next is G, and then the third is A. and then the fifth is another two, which makes it C


+1

sorry for not thinking to explain that!
#8
Thanks for all the help, looking through the studybass guide atm, think I'm getting the hang of it
#10
Quote by Deliriumbassist
3) is not an F chord. A chord has 3 different notes- all you have there is two F notes and an A. However, playing the C on the A string, giving you F C F A makes an F major chord. The posted "chord" is referred to as F(no5)


well technically you dont need the 5th. an F and an A are enough because it is the 3rd that gives the chord its quality but the 5th makes it a full triad. i guess its a little more of a voice leading/part writing thing
#11
Quote by dr.will
well technically you dont need the 5th. an F and an A are enough because it is the 3rd that gives the chord its quality but the 5th makes it a full triad. i guess its a little more of a voice leading/part writing thing

But there are only two notes, despite the fact that there is an F F A.
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#12
Quote by lordofthefood1
But there are only two notes, despite the fact that there is an F F A.



exactly which means its not a full F major chord, but its still an F major chord...its a wierd thing but basically as long as there is a root and a major/minor 3rd to give the notes a quality then your good. i find this especially important on bass because of only having 4 strings and larger fret spacing which makes it hard to play full chords. its basically a compromise

for example you have your chocolate covered cream/jelly filled donut. damn good, right? now say you take away the chocolate...its not quite the same, but its still damn good.