#1
Ok so I'm learning Music Theory I just started not that long ago on Major Scales I know there is 12. All the sharp notes are flat scales. But on the Internet some people have F# Major, C# Major and G# Major. Should I reference them even though they are the same notes in flats that I have in my book. I just don't want to drop them if they will serve a purpose in the future towards something else in Music Theory.

This is in my book for Major Scales

C Major
Db Major
D Major
Eb Major
E Major
F Major
Gb Major
G Major
Ab Major
A Major
Bb Major
B Major
Last edited by ColinMc at Jul 15, 2009,
#3
You have F# Major there....just written as Gb......its the same note....and all major scales are the same interval so its exactly the same.
#5
I knew they were the same I just needed to know if it was important to write it down for key signitures or something like that.
#6
They're the same notes, but if you were to write, for example, A# major:

A# B# D D# E# G A

And, it's messy- by convention, we try to have one of each letter in a scale, since it's easier/less ambiguous to write a key signature for, and is less messy when we come to use accidentals. If you were to write that "normally", it'd be

A# B# C## D# E# F## G##

And that's not nice at all.

If you called that A# Bb, you'd get

Bb C D Eb F G A

Which has a key signature of 2 flats. It'd be silly to use a signature with 10 sharps (which would be A# major if we ever used it), and if you were to use a sharp accidental you'd have triple sharp intervals, which is ridiculous.

However, yeah, A# is the same note as Bb, but has a different function in a scale- A# would be an augmented fourth in E, for example, while Bb would be a diminished 5th.
Last edited by MopMaster at Jul 15, 2009,
#7
Quote by MopMaster
They're the same notes, but if you were to write, for example, A# major:

A# B# D D# E# G A

And, it's messy- by convention, we try to have one of each letter in a scale, since it's easier/less ambiguous to write a key signature for, and is less messy when we come to use accidentals. If you were to write that "normally", it'd be

A# B# C## D# E# F## G##

And that's not nice at all.

If you called that A# Bb, you'd get

Bb C D Eb F G A

Which has a key signature of 2 flats. It'd be silly to use a signature with 10 sharps (which would be A# major if we ever used it), and if you were to use a sharp accidental you'd have triple sharp intervals, which is ridiculous.

However, yeah, A# is the same note as Bb, but has a different function in a scale- A# would be an augmented fourth in E, for example, while Bb would be a diminished 5th.


Ok thanks for clearing that up good thing I did make all the sharp notes flat scales.
#8
F# major is enharmonic to Gb major. As in, they sound the same; they are only different on paper. For the most part these types of instances are safely interchangeable -- you can use F# major anywhere you would use Gb major and visa versa. There are a few keys, though, that should be avoided and there enharmonic equivalent used instead, like A# major. MopMaster already covered that
i don't know why i feel so dry