#1
Yes, once again a 'What key?' topic. This is the deal: I've tried to learn how to figure this out for 2 hours now, and I have a huge headache. I've given up now. I'm not just asking you guys because it's easy for me, I'm asking because I'm desperate.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/j/jesse_stutsman/feel_the_burn_crd.htm
This is the song, a song by a guy I quite admire, and I'd like to do a bit of soloing over his track. But I need to know the key, and what scales I can use.

Please keep the flaming at a minimum, I've actually tried to do this myself, but it's just too confusing for me right now...
Tell me who's that writin'...
Last edited by Kylianvb at Jul 15, 2009,
#2
uh key of G?

I'm not good with keys myself but i think its G
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Last edited by ..SLASH.. at Jul 15, 2009,
#4
y would it be key of C?
Top Bands
- Guns N Roses
- Death
- Jimi Hendrix Experience
- Led Zeppelin
- The Black Dahlia Murder


" I'M THE ONE THAT HAS TO DIE WHEN IT'S TIME FOR ME TO DIE, SO LET ME LIVE MY LIFE, THE WAY I WANT TO."

- Jimi Hendrix
#7
I'm with C- it's a IV V I in C, but it depends on timings, melody, and all that lot. And since I'm not listening to music right now (dare from a friend) I can't tell you.

*edit* Forgot about that capo, so it's gonna be Eb.
Last edited by MopMaster at Jul 15, 2009,
#8
Quote by MopMaster
I'm with C- it's a IV V I in C, but it depends on timings, melody, and all that lot. And since I'm not listening to music right now (dare from a friend) I can't tell you.

*edit* Forgot about that capo, so it's gonna be Eb.


A IV V I in C would be F G C. It just looks like V VI I to me, borrowing the A from Cm. But I don't have a guitar on me, so I can't hear how it sounds. I guess the capo would mean it's in Eb.
#9
My input is that the Csus2 could be viewed as a Gsus4. So the progression would infact be G - A - Gsus4, which would indicate, or at least be almost diatonic in, D major (the C in the Gsus4 being a chromatic tone).

And, because there's a capo on the third fret the sounding key in fact be F major.
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#10
Quote by mr_magic
My input is that the Csus2 could be viewed as a Gsus4. So the progression would infact be G - A - Gsus4, which would indicate, or at least be almost diatonic in, D major (the C in the Gsus4 being a chromatic tone).

And, because there's a capo on the third fret the sounding key in fact be F major.


But it's not a Csus2. It's a Cadd9, which has the notes C E G F. A Csus2 just has C F G. Completely different.
#13
He's tuned a half-step down in the video. Based on the video, I'd say it's in G (A, regarding the capo and tuning). The A major (B, regarding the capo and tuning) is an accidental.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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#14
Quote by timeconsumer09
But it's not a Csus2. It's a Cadd9, which has the notes C E G F. A Csus2 just has C F G. Completely different.


I was sure I read Csus2!

But the E is still diatonic in D major, and the Gsus4 would in that case be a G7/4.


Edit: btw, the second or ninth of C is d
"And everybody knows that you live forever
Ah, when you've done a line or two"
Last edited by mr_magic at Jul 15, 2009,
#15
If you play the chords in E standard without the capo: key of G major.
With the capo on the 3rd fret also in E standard: key of Bb major.
With the capo on the 3rd fret in Eb standard: key of A major.

Someone said that this was played with a capo on 3rd while in Eb Standard, so I included that too. There really isn't any question about this. It's 3 chord that are most certainly in G without the capo.

You do know how a capo affects the key, right TS? If not, it's pretty simple. If the song played without a capo was, say, in the key of D and you put a capo on, say, the 4th fret, then you'd have to raise the key by 4 semitones, so it would be in the key of F#. Comprende?

Edit: timeconsumer09: If you had a guitar with you then you would have heard that it's in G for sure.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#16
In G for sure. The A major chord could be explained through pivot modulation.
#17
Quote by Cyberbob
In G for sure. The A major chord could be explained through pivot modulation.


modulating to where?
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
#18
If he's downtuned a half-step, it's obviously in A. I don't have a guitar on me right now so I can't make sure exactly.

OP, you may have noticed when soloing that you'll sometimes find clashing notes when he plays that A major chord. To rectify this problem, do not play the "D" note in the A major scale during the A major chord - it clashes. Try playing the A major pentatonic over it if you keep getting clashing notes.
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#19
The A Major is probably normally considered modal interchange from G Lydian. Don't worry about that right now, please. Think of it as essentially being in G. Over the A chord, however, the C in the key of G is raised to a C#. Do not think of this as a modulation to D major, even though that's what it may seem like to begin with, and where the first two chords would fit.

For improvisational purposes, just treat it like it's in G. You can get away with G major pentatonic the entire way through, but the more "educated" path might be to take advantage of the "special" tone in the A chord, the C#. You can either lead into it from a D or a C natural for an interesting chromatic effect. Another song with the same progression is Dreaming With a Broken Heart by John Mayer. Check that one out.
#20
I have a guitar now. Playing with the video, you can use A major to improvise. The clashing notes aren't very noticeable because he never sticks on the offending chord for very long.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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