#1
I was just looking on google for some chords to learn and came across this one

A/A#

The chart said every chord that has A as a root so it did do A/(every note name) chromatically to cover all of the bass notes. So I guess they technically did cover all the chords.

Is this actually a practical chord or just put in their to cover every chord?
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#2
anything's a chord with three or more notes in it.. and they're all at your disposal.
Last edited by pepsi1187 at Jul 15, 2009,
#4
Quote by pepsi1187
anything's a chord with three or more notes in it.. and they're all at your disposal.


Why three? I know the definition says three, but why are two notes not a chord?
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#5
two notes is a double stop.

and yes i know anything is chord, that didn't really help much.
Earth without ART, is just Eh...
#6
Because a chord has to have a tonic a mediant and a dominant note. Dont ask why, thats just the rule
#7
I'm sure you could make that chord function, but on its own it's pretty useless.

TBH, it's more important to learn about harmony than it is to learn random chords. If you learn more about harmony (and voice leading) then you'll be creating new chords yourself (shape-wise, of course) that fit they way you want them to in a progression.
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#8
Quote by metalzeppelin
two notes is a double stop.

and yes i know anything is chord, that didn't really help much.


well you pretty much answered your own question in your post.
#9
Quote by pepsi1187
well you pretty much answered your own question in your post.


I thought the TS asked if it had a practical application, not if it was actually a chord.
#11
Very rarely will you see a chord written out that way. More often, a guitarist or pianist will be playing an A chord while the bass player independently plays an A# somewhere, usually for the purpose of chromatic motion. For instance,
Chords: Amaj        Bm7 E7
Bass:   A A A# A# B F E G#
in which the bass player is using the A# to lead chromatically into the B.
#12
i use that chord as a passing chord sometimes.

Play with a bluesey feel E -> A -> A/A# -> B there ya go, just found a use for that chord
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#13
Quote by metalzeppelin
I was just looking on google for some chords to learn and came across this one

A/A#

The chart said every chord that has A as a root so it did do A/(every note name) chromatically to cover all of the bass notes. So I guess they technically did cover all the chords.

Is this actually a practical chord or just put in their to cover every chord?


Haha i think that sometimes too. I mean it could be useful in rare scenarios. And that still doesn't change the fact that it exists. 90% of everything you use in music theory is not applicable for a particular person. Same with life.
#14
It's basically an B♭m/Δ7♭5

Don't ask me what it's used for, or where it's used, cause I haven't been through enough (jazz side of) music theory yet.

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#15
Quote by metalzeppelin
I was just looking on google for some chords to learn and came across this one

A/A#

The chart said every chord that has A as a root so it did do A/(every note name) chromatically to cover all of the bass notes. So I guess they technically did cover all the chords.

Is this actually a practical chord or just put in their to cover every chord?



It's "just put in their to cover every chord"

It is not a practical or commonly used chord.
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#16
Quote by metalzeppelin
two notes is a double stop.

and yes i know anything is chord, that didn't really help much.


nope, 2 notes is a diad, 3 notes is a triad. a triad (or more) is considered a chord. 2 notes aren't considered a chord.

a double stop is a "technique" when playing