#1
ive been using a behringer 1202 xenyx mixer to record with my band, the way ive been using it is by plugging in mics to the inputs and then eq-ing while recording live onto a computer.
this means that, for example if im using 4 mics simultaneously to record drums, i can eq each part of the drum kit and record it all, but as it gets recorded onto my computer's soundcard, the 4 signals will get mixed into 1.

this is fine if the eq-ing i did was good, but what if i made a mistake or wanted to go back and adjust the eq AFTER it had already been recorded? how can i do this if its already been mixed into one channel on the computer?

i know that its common in studios to record everything with no adjustments made, and then mix it afterwards. how would i do this though because i need it to go into the mixer first other wise i would only be able to record one track at a time. obviously for recording drums, you need at least 4 simultaneously, so its necessary to run the mics into the mixer first.

i cant see how i can record the drums AND be able to go back and use the mixer to eq each track individually after recording?
someone help?
#2
That sounds pretty tricky, I don't know if its possible. Hopefully someone recommends something because I would like to know as well.

At this point, unless you maybe have some fancy equipment, I dont see how it could be possible to EQ each track seperately once they are all one.

By the way, sorry I couldnt help.
Last edited by Dookie92 at Jul 16, 2009,
#3
Impossible.

It's a mixing desk. It's made to mix down to a single stereo track. Thats what it does..
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#4
Quote by willieturnip
Impossible.

It's a mixing desk. It's made to mix down to a single stereo track. Thats what it does..

well then how do they do it in the studio? because they often record everything first and then eq it all later. would i have to buy some other hardware to do this?
#5
You need an audio interface that has multiple inputs. For example, an audio interface with 8 inputs would allow you to plug 8 mics into the interface and send all 8 chanells to your computer as seperate tracks. Audio interfaces basically act as an external soud card. Your USB thing that came with your mixer is a very simple 2 in 2 out audio interface. You could buy an interface that would allow you to record or more tracks, but depending on your budget, that may not be realistic (expect to spend no less than $250-300 for a decent interface, more likely upwards of $350).

For future reference, when buying a mixer for recording, make sure it has a good amount of busses as the mixer you have is pretty much useless for anything besides stereo (2track) recording.

If you have any questions, just send me a PM.
#6
Quote by wardyh
well then how do they do it in the studio? because they often record everything first and then eq it all later. would i have to buy some other hardware to do this?


What studios will have is a mixing desk with an input and output for each channel, then these go into something along the lines of a 192 so every track on the mixer goes into its' own digital track. You can't that without a budget in the thousands price range.

What I do is use a mixer to record a drum kit into a 2-input interface, which then gives one channel for the drums, amnd the second channel which is a guide track with guitar. Then you can layer all the other instruments and overdubs to their own dedicated tracks.

It's a bit inflexible to have to do this, but it works fine provided you get a good drum sound that doesn't need too much tweaking.

If you want to hear an example of an epic fail, check out the songs on my band's myspace; then compare the drum sound to 'Situations', which sounds fine.
Last edited by BrianApocalypse at Jul 16, 2009,
#8
ok so what if i only had 1 track saved on my computer? i should be able to eq that using the mixer afterwards? how would i get the track from the computer to the mixer?

EDIT: is there a way to split the stereo output which goes to the computer into 4 cables, each one with one track on it?
Last edited by wardyh at Jul 17, 2009,
#9
Don't eq with the mixer. Your mixer is cheap and won't do nearly as good of a job as the software eq. I hate to say this, but honestly, your mixer alone is next to useless for recording. It has too few output options. Basically, all its good for are its preamps.

Furthermore, even if you mixer was better, most people (pros included) still set eq in the software. In today's studios, mixers are generally used for preamps, siganal routing and conecting external gear such as compressors, not setting eq. Because your mixer is quite simple, all it could be used for are its preamps. And no, you can split your stereo signal onto four cables each with their own track.

Again, if you have any questions, just give me a shout.
#10
OK, let me explain. That mixer is for recording. It's so that you can cram as many mics as possible into your ****ty 2-in interface (I'm using a similar setup btw).

In studios they have loads of really expensive gear (your eyes would expload looking at some of the prices). We don't have access to this, so instead we use SOFTWARE. Which is what you should be doing.

What software are you using?
#12
If your wallet allows it, you can buy a firewire interface with loads of inputs. then you can record it into a DAW and EQ it afterwards.

First you have to make sure that your comp can handle many tracks and has a firewire input.
#13
OK, it can handle VST plugins (FX and virtual instruments) so I'd do a search on kvraudio.com for plugins like EQ and compressors. Then you load them into mixcraft and add them to the tracks.
#14
Quote by wardyh
ive been using a behringer 1202 xenyx mixer to record with my band, the way ive been using it is by plugging in mics to the inputs and then eq-ing while recording live onto a computer.
this means that, for example if im using 4 mics simultaneously to record drums, i can eq each part of the drum kit and record it all, but as it gets recorded onto my computer's soundcard, the 4 signals will get mixed into 1.

this is fine if the eq-ing i did was good, but what if i made a mistake or wanted to go back and adjust the eq AFTER it had already been recorded? how can i do this if its already been mixed into one channel on the computer?

i know that its common in studios to record everything with no adjustments made, and then mix it afterwards. how would i do this though because i need it to go into the mixer first other wise i would only be able to record one track at a time. obviously for recording drums, you need at least 4 simultaneously, so its necessary to run the mics into the mixer first.

i cant see how i can record the drums AND be able to go back and use the mixer to eq each track individually after recording?
someone help?

I have a xenyx 1204, and it is impossible to do what you want with that mixer.
#15
Quote by GisleAune
If your wallet allows it, you can buy a firewire interface with loads of inputs. then you can record it into a DAW and EQ it afterwards.

First you have to make sure that your comp can handle many tracks and has a firewire input.

this sounds like a good idea. right so a firewire interface? this is different to a 4 in/4 out interface?
im willing to spend money to get an interface definitely.
presumably i would plug the 4 mics into this first, and then from that go straight into the pc and record 4 tracks simultaneously.
but after this stage im lost.
how would i get the 4 individual tracks from the pc to the mixer and back again?

and can you suggest a suitable low budget interface? around £100 probably?
thanks
#16
^

Sigh... Why do you insist on running everything back into the mixer? First of all, unless you entire finished recording consisted of only four tracks, it would be impossible to do what you want to do without throwing tracks out of sync and possibly encountering feedback issues. Besides, like I said before, your mixer is pretty bad and not even close to what you could achieve with software EQ. It would be a different story if you had a great sounding professional consul, but alas, you have a cheap low quality board with very few options.

There are ways (or at least on way) to effectivly use your mixer to better your studio, but using it for EQing your mix will yeild far inferior results than mixing internally.
#17
yes, we have had sync issues but as far as i can see the only way to overcome these would be to record everything live and that would require a lot of mics. even if we put the amps together in a circle next to the kit and record with lots of bleed, i cant see how we would achieve a better sound without having to use at least 8 mics, and this would mean buying a console with 8 mics inputs. now we are getting into the territory of studio production which as we agreed, is out of my depth.

i wanted to run it back into the mixer because i actually prefer to be hands-on when adjusting sound instead of clicking a mouse.

but say for the sake of argument i was to use an interface to record the tracks (which is something i may seriously consider), and then adjust the sound using software. how would the mixer be used for its pre amps without mixing the tracks into stereo before they reach the computer? surely if the mics were plugged into the mixer for its preamps, they would all get mixed to 1 track?
#19
Alright. First of all, even if you record each track one at a time, if your not running the tracks back into the mixer, you shouldn't have sync issues. If you do, this is because of latency. You can look at the 1000 or so threads on eliminating that problem later.

Anyway, to answer your first question, with you mixer, you would be able to feed 3 seperate tracks to an interface. Plug mics into channels one, two and three. Pan channels 1 and 2 hard left and hard right respectivly and turn both of their FX levels all the way down to nothing. Mute the third channel, but make sure its FX send volume is on. Connect the L and R control room outs (Ch 1&2 on your mixer) to inputs 1&2 on the interface. Conncect the FX send (carrying your 3rd channel) to the third input of your mixer. This way, you can use your mixer's preamps and set the EQ for the mics (although you will make the final mix later inside the software).

If you had bought a bit better of a mixer (say, the 1204), you would be able to send 4 seperate mic channels to an interface, which is in my opinion, the minimum you need to record solid drums without overly limmiting your mixing options (snare/hi-hat, kick, two overheads). My suggestion to you (again, assuming you are on a budget) is to return/sell/trade in your mixer (BUT KEEP THE LITTLE INTERFACE THAT IT CAME WITH), get the 1204 (which will come with another interface) and, assuming your program allows you to use 2 interfaces at the same time, you will be able to send 4 tracks to and from the computer. If your willing to cough up a bit more cash, buy the M-Auido Fast Track Pro or a similar 4-in interface (about $200-250).
#20
Furthermore, I understand and agree 100% that hands on mixing beats using a mouse all the time. I recomend a control surface, such as the Behringer BCF2000. It has real knobs and faders that will actually let you control the knobs and faders in the software. Very cool and quite affordible.

Quote by CatharsisStudio
your mixers preamps proably arent as good as an interface imho


I find that most of the lower end interface's preamps are actually far inferior to the Xenyx preamps. Plus most of the lower end interfaces will only come with 2 preamps. If we were talking about, say, a higher end Focusrite interface, different story.
#21
ok thanks, but why wouldnt it work to just plug mics into channels 1, 2, 3 and 4 and then send them to the interface? what does the fx send do?
and the mixer didnt come with an interface (i dont think)
#22
You can't just magically send tracks from the mixer to the interface. You actually have to connect outputs from the mixer to inputs of the interface (which is why your current mixer is less than ideal for recording as it has few output options).

The FX send is often used for sending signals to external effects processors, but it can also be used as another output for recording purposes. Finally, that little 2 in 2 out RCA USB thing that came with your mixer (I'm assuming that's what you're using to put your tracks on your computer now) is an interface. A simple interface, but still an interface. All Xenyx mixers come with one.

Hope this helps, and let me know anything is still unclear.
#23
thanks, and that makes sense. but what i might do is still connect up 4 mics, but have the fx on channels 3 and 4. so i would get 3 separate tracks but 4 signals.
so what i need is an interface

but one last thing, my mixer definitely did not come with any kind of interface, but would it work to just use a breakout box like this one as an interface:
http://www.m-audio.com/products/en_us/Delta44.html
but without the sound card?
that would still get the tracks into the pc right? or would you recommend buying a pair of usb 2 in 2 out interfaces instead?

and finally, could the mixer be used as a control surface? as in, once the tracks are in the computer, would i be able to run them back into the mixer to eq, and mix down into a stereo track?
#24
For the delta 44, you need to use the sound card (also known as a PCI interface). These can be good, but are rather inconvient as they aren't exactly mobile. In my opinion, your best bet would be to find a USB 2.0 or Firewire interface that gives you at least 4 inputs.

Finally, yes you could run the tracks back into the mixer, but as I've said before, with your mixer, this would only work if your entire recording consisted of about 4 tracks and you would STILL get better results with the software. It seems you want to use the mixer just so you can look like your in a pro studio. Unfortunatly, your mixer sucks for recording purposes and is WAYYYY too small for this kind of work. If you want to SOUND (not look) similar to pro studios, use your sofware or spend a couple grand on a massive mixer and a 24 in 24 out interface.

Listen with your ears. Not your eyes.
#26
If I might ask, why are you touching the EQ while you're recording? I'm under the impression that when you say you're adjusting the EQ that you're adjusting the faders, meaning you're MIXING the audio.

An interface is a sound card. When these guys talk about audio interfaces they're referring to special sound cards designed specifically or audio recording. It's basically to distinguish the difference between an M-Audio card which would be for recording versus a Creative card which would be for average use. Most audio interfaces come with multiple ins and outs, and sometimes even balanced and/or digital inputs. You need a separate input to the computer for every separate track you want to record. If you want to record 4 tracks simultaneously you need an audio interface with 4 analog inputs. I say analog inputs because companies have a tendency to include both analog and digital inputs in the total.

Also you can't use the mixer as a control surface for your DAW (computer software). You could send the signals back and mix down to a stereo track, but I don't see any purpose in that, and it will not sound very good.

Hope that helps.

Also,

Quote by BrianApocalypse
What studios will have is a mixing desk with an input and output for each channel, then these go into something along the lines of a 192 so every track on the mixer goes into its' own digital track. You can't that without a budget in the thousands price range.


What's a 192 ? Sorry I just get a little nit picky when I see people mixing and matching incorrect terminology.
Last edited by take_it_t at Jul 22, 2009,
#27
currently im just eq-ing while im tracking using the mixer. mics go into the inputs and i do all the eq i need to first, and then track live, mixing into a stereo channel.

which is why i want to buy an interface - so i can record the tracks first, and then adjust the actual sound afterwards.

but i would prefer something more portable than a pci card so i can record on more than one computer - i dont have the drum kit at my house. usb or firewire interfaces would obviously be more practical but get incredibly expensive from what ive seen for a 4 input interface. i cant really spend more than £100 - £150, and all that ive seen for that price with 4 inputs are the pci card interfaces.
so instead of installing the pci card why not just buy the breakout box on its own - this is the thing the mics will plug into, so surely i can just plug the breakout box into my existing card? which is an integrated realtek hd thingy.

or better yet - the breakout box has a firewire output - how about buying a firewire to usb cable so i can plug the breakout box into the usb port?
#28
Where to begin. For one thing, the breakout boxes which you see, come in addition to the PCI card. As far as I'm aware it's not a standardized entity, the breakout box is really just an external housing for the connectors for the PCI card, as opposed to having a bunch of cables running out of the back, or worse a bunch of connectors on the back itself.

Also Firewire and USB are two different connections, it's not as straightforward as you'd like to think where you can magically convert one into the other. Also a breakout box wouldn't have a firewire output, otherwise it would just be a standalone firewire audio interface.
#30
ok so that wouldnt work then!

can anyone suggest a usb or firewire interface (preferably usb) that has at least 3 analog inputs, and a 4th channel with a mic input and a preamp for less than £200?
ive seen the m audio fast track pro, but as far as i know that only has 2 channels (i think)
and ive also seen the m audio fast track ultra but that has 4 preamps and 8 channels which is more than i need. theres no point paying more for something i wont use. so isnt there anything inbetween?
thanks
#32
its going into the computer in mono. just taking the left main out of the mixer and running it into the computer's line in, and panning everything all the way left. i dont currently have an interface and this is the only way to get the sound in. but i cant pan the tracks, and all the adjustments have to be made in real time, as its being recorded.
#33
Well, the cheapest way to get a 4 in 4 out system would be to buy 2 behiringer 2 in 2 out interfaces. These will have RCA ins and outs, so you will need a few 1/4 to RCA adapters. You could probably pick two of these up for about a fifth of the price of a Fast Track Pro.

EDIT: These are USB interfaces by the way.
#34
thats a good idea actually. more than enough inputs for vocals, bass and guitars.
but for drums, ideally i would like 4 inputs so i could have separate tracks for the kick, snare, and each overhead. but as mentioned earlier, my mixer only can process 3 channels so this means even if i bought 2 behringer interfaces, i would have 4 inputs total, but only able to use 3 of them at a time.

so i would probably have to mix the overheads into a single track meaning i wouldnt be able to pan them in stereo. i could adjust my kick and snare separately but i wouldnt get a very wide stereo image because essentially, everything would be right in the middle.

either that, or i would plug in an extra dynamic mic directly into the interface, and bypass the preamps on my mixer. do dynamic mics need preamps?

unless there is a way to use all 4 preamps on my mixer and still somehow run each of them to individual inputs on the interfaces?
#35
You could only do that if your mixer had inserts. Unfortunatly, your's doesn't.

What I would do with this set up for drums is send the snare and kick to the 2 main outs, send the stereo overheads both to the FX send and use a 1/4 to RCA PAIR adapter. This means all 4 inteface inputs would be used and you would achieve better sound closer to a true stereo recording.

Good luck.