#1
Hello everyone,

I am trying to be as patient as possible with fast solos. But at some point I get frustrated. What I do is that I break the solo into small pieces and combine them at the end, as people suggest in this way. The problem is, I can play the solo well when I play it slowly. Once I increase the beat on the metronome, say 5 beats more, my accuracy decreases a lot. No matter how much I try, my fingers go to an incorrect fret (this is the worst problem), and my pull offs or slides becomes terrible. I am working on Metallica's Creeping Death solo by the way. Are there any other suggestions that you can give me other than breaking solo into small pieces, etc?

Thanks a lot in advance!!!
#2
If your accuracy decreases that much then you need to keep practicing at a slower speed. You should find the fastest speed you can play it PERFECTLY and start there. If your missing frets or only hitting 95% of the notes slow it down.
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#4
Personally, I sit for a while with the solo infront of me and the song on loop and just read the tab along with the solo.
basically, I dont learn it in sections as such, but build it up slowly.
So when I go to play it, Ill play as much as i can remember/Till I mess up, then drill that section for ages. when thats good, ill try and remember a bit more, but going from the begining everytime.
Works great for me but everyone has their own ways
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#5
if you can already play it perfectly at a slower speed, then increase it by 3 bpm not 5 or work it up 1 bpm at a time...
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#6
Alright then it seems I will keep practising
Thanks guys for the replies.
#7
When your using the metronome to get up to tempo i suggest moving up two bpm then going back 1 this is just a more thorough version of what your already doing. E.g go from 60 to 62 then back to 61 then to 63 etc. Also

*Make sure your moving your pick as little as possible (speed=time)
*The same thing applies with your fingers
*Be sure to work out exactly where your fingers are going before you practice a section
*Also use alternate picking for fast sections i.e up-down-up-down
*Practice one particular section for about 10 mins and then move onto a different one
*Be patient this is very time-consuming but there really is no other way to do it.
#8
Quote by demon.guitarist
Its the same for everybody, you just need to keep at it.

1. Get it down perfectly while playing slowly
2. Then increase the speed and get that perfect
3. Repeat last step till at required speed and standard.



I second this. Doing this is pretty much the best way to do it, IMO.
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#9
Well, it seems I increase the tempo a lot lol. I admit though, some parts of the solo, I am not playing it perfectly. For instance, there are some parts, which contains a lot of pull-offs and hammer-ons. I feel like I am losing a lot of time, while moving my hand from one position to another after each pull-off.
#10
Quote by robomatt
Hello everyone,

I am trying to be as patient as possible with fast solos. But at some point I get frustrated. What I do is that I break the solo into small pieces and combine them at the end, as people suggest in this way. The problem is, I can play the solo well when I play it slowly. Once I increase the beat on the metronome, say 5 beats more, my accuracy decreases a lot. No matter how much I try, my fingers go to an incorrect fret (this is the worst problem), and my pull offs or slides becomes terrible. I am working on Metallica's Creeping Death solo by the way. Are there any other suggestions that you can give me other than breaking solo into small pieces, etc?

Thanks a lot in advance!!!


Be more patient and learn to work on things that are realistic for your skill level. Allow yourself the time to develop.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 16, 2009,
#11
play it at your target speed...

play it WAY slower than your target speed...

play it WAY faster than your target speed...

return to your target speed...

(for each of these you'll want to play through it more than once obviously)

rinse and repeat

**side note: when trying to build speed, patience is key. obviously not everyone gets fast at the same rate. this is okay as long as you have the patience to get where you want to go.
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Last edited by konfyouzd at Jul 16, 2009,
#12
Quote by konfyouzd
play it at your target speed...

play it WAY slower than your target speed...

play it WAY faster than your target speed...

return to your target speed...

(for each of these you'll want to play through it more than once obviously)

rinse and repeat


How ya gonna play it WAY faster than the original, when the original is WAY faster than you have the ability to play well in the 1st place?

spending time playing it slow is always a good idea. If your working on something that is realistic, it will help you out alot. If you working on something far beyond your skill level, it can serve as a 1st exposure, but you're still unlikely to be able to play it. In many cases, a person is better off taking a step back and finding something that is more realistic (do-able if you will), for their skill level.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 16, 2009,
#13
Quote by GuitarMunky
How ya gonna play it WAY faster than the original, when the original is WAY faster than you have the ability to play well in the 1st place?


you obviously aren't going to be able to hit all of the notes... but attempting to play it faster than the speed you're comfortable with makes it seem easier when you go back to the original speed.

watch john petrucci's rock discipline. this is EXACTLY what he says to do. i've done it... it worked for me...
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
#14
Quote by robomatt
Well, it seems I increase the tempo a lot lol. I admit though, some parts of the solo, I am not playing it perfectly. For instance, there are some parts, which contains a lot of pull-offs and hammer-ons. I feel like I am losing a lot of time, while moving my hand from one position to another after each pull-off.


It may be common sense, but after you break the solo down into pieces, spend the vast majority of your practice time on the pieces you have the most trouble with and hardly any time on the pieces you find easy. Don't just go through the whole song (or solo) again and again from start to finish.