#1
When I try to record my guitar through the amp external speaker output onto my computer (using REAPER software), I get a bunch of static background noise. When I turn up the volume on the amp the guitar I do get is loud and gain-ey and overpowering. However, If I don't do this, my guitar is lost in the background fuzz.

I SUSPECT that this is because my microphone is picking up sounds outside of my jack (i have a built in mic too). So I guess what I'm alluding to is: How do I disable the built-in mic from picking up sounds outside of the external microphone jack on my computer???

p.s I have a crate acoustic (gunnison) amp, and I am using the external speaker jack and plugging the other end into the mic jack on my laptop
#2
Using the in line jack on your computer actually gives bad quality sound. it's better if you use a dynamic or condeser microphone, put it infront of your amp, and record.
#3
First of all you don't use an ext speaker out straight to the line in of the computer. This will overdrive the line in to clipping. Maybe that's why it sounds so bad. Second, you select the recording source as line in or mic, so you shouldn't be getting both.

You need to pad the signal from a ext speaker jack to line level audio. A Behringer Ultra-G will do this. You need to turn off the +20db boost on the mic input to reduce noise and help prevent clipping. The boost selection is in an "advanced" dialog accessable from the recording section of the volume control dialog. Look at the mic control in the recording section.

If you do thsi you should get a reasonably decent recording.
#4
fly135 is correct, except I believe your amp has a line level output, eliminating the need for any extra gear. You should be using it instead of the external speaker jack. If not, follow the above advice.
Various Strats
PRS SC245 (2007)
Fessenden SD-10 pedal steel
Koch Studiotone XL
Mesa Boogie Express 5:25+
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#5
You need a balanced line out, which is a very low level signal designed specifically for mixers and interfaces.

EDIT: Yeah what teh guy above me said basically
#6
Quote by Meatball200
You need a balanced line out, which is a very low level signal designed specifically for mixers and interfaces.

EDIT: Yeah what teh guy above me said basically


Ah, the rare thread where everyone gives a good answer!

I forgot one thing. When you use your line out directly into your computer, you run into the issue of being able to monitor what you are playing. There is the issue of latency. You may notice a slight delay between what you play and what you hear. You can use monitors attached to your computer or headphones. It doesn't matter in your case. I don't have any suggestions if the latency is so bad that it affects your playing.
Various Strats
PRS SC245 (2007)
Fessenden SD-10 pedal steel
Koch Studiotone XL
Mesa Boogie Express 5:25+
1958 National lap steel
Eastman El Rey 1
#7
When you run into the line in or mic input of a computer the playback section of the volume control allows direct monitoring of the input signal so there is no latency.

If the ext speaker jack of your amp is actually a line out or headphone output then disregard the need for the Ultra-G. However everything else I said applies to clipping and overdriving the input. You need to turn off the boost for the mic and make sure the levels coming into the mic input are reduced so clipping does not occur.

edit: another reason for using the Ultra-G with an ext speaker jack is that it provides a speaker sim (aka speaker compensation). This filters the signal to reduce harshness in a way similar to the response of a guitar speaker.
Last edited by fly135 at Jul 16, 2009,