#1
Hi guys, I'm almost a total theory noob, so thanks for helping me out. My question is, if I wanted to solo over TNT by AC/DC, what scales could I use? And if you don't mind could someone give me a short lesson on how to find the scales myself? Thanks
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Epiphone Les Paul Custom

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Blackheart Little Giant
Jet City JCA20H

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#2
Quote by HappyGoth013
And if you don't mind could someone give me a short lesson on how to find the scales myself

You can use any scale that fits in the key of the song. There's no one way of finding the key, it's just something that comes naturally as you learn more theory.

As for TNT, I think the E blues or E minor Pentatonic should work. The song might be tuned down a half step, not sure.
#3
you can use any scale you want as long as you stay in key. you shouldn't categorize each scale for a certain genre. i suggest you should learn the pentatonic scale in all positions if you don't already and just find the key of the song and just play to it. hope that helped
#4
Thanks guys.
My Gear:

Guitars:
Partscaster
Fender MIM Telecaster
Epiphone Les Paul Custom

Amps:
Blackheart Little Giant
Jet City JCA20H

Pedals:
BYOC Confidence Boost
BYOC Dist+
BYOC Shredder
GGG Tubescreamer
Zvex SHO
#5
for that song it would be E minor pentatonic or blues scale. for finding a key, you need to find the note or chord that the progression seems to resolve to. most people say to look at the last chord and/or the first chord. this isnt always true, but for a lot of music like blues and rock and most popular music, this is true. you'll get better with finding the key as time goes on. usually i try to find the root notes of the progression, then i figure out the chords. then from there i can usually find the key. but when you become for familiar with standard chord progressions, you'll be able to find the key pretty quick.
#6
Em pentatonic / G pentatonic scales would fit in there..also you can try arpeggios OR you can ride the characteristics of each chord..for example if there is an Em chord going on, you could play a G note, hammer on the A next to it and bend that A up to B, which is the last note of the Em triad..stuff like that can sound rly good