#1
I am working on a song in which there is a guitar riff that is harmonized. The riff in is D minor and i want to harmonize it with another guitar playing the same riff a fifth up. So my question is on the guitar that is playing a fifth up is the note supposed to be a perfect fifth up every time or do all the notes the second guitar is playing have to fit in scale?

for example: in D minor if the first guitar plays an E note would the second guitar play an A#(the in scale tone) or a B (a perfect fifth up)?
Quote by zac362
not many ppl have heard of the lochrian mode, mainly cos its only really usefull for mindless shredding
#2
it would be Bb, not A#, and youd harmonize it with the Bb
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#4
Quote by blue_strat
Experiment - you could use either.

he has a point too. but if you are harmonizing in fifths, youd use Bb. personally, i like harmonizing thirds, especially in D minor
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#5
like a series of powerchords that are too fast for one person to play?
Quote by archerygenious
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#6
With this kind of thing, I'd say sticking to perfect 5ths should get the desired effect. There's nothing to stop you from throwing in a sharp or flat fifth, or another interval altogether though. It's all down to what you think sounds good, there are no rules. Personally I'd probably throw in some major and minor thirds for some variation - straight perfect fifth harmonization sounds a bit predictable and overused, IMO.
#7
do you know how to play minor powerchords?

|-------------------------------------------------
|-------------------------------------------------
|-------------------------------------------------
|--2---3---5------------------------------------ Minor third harmony
|--3---5---7------------------------------------ Root note
|-------------------------------------------------
#8
Quote by UltimateDud
do you know how to play minor powerchords?

|-------------------------------------------------
|-------------------------------------------------
|-------------------------------------------------
|--2---3---5------------------------------------ Minor third harmony
|--3---5---7------------------------------------ Root note
|-------------------------------------------------


Are those called minor powerchords? Never heard that before.


EDIT:

D|--2--| = major third harmony.
A|--3--|
Last edited by wesselbindt at Jul 17, 2009,
#9
Alright i'll try it with both Bb and B and see which one i like better. I will also experiment with harmonizing in thirds and see how that sounds. Thanks for all the help.
Quote by zac362
not many ppl have heard of the lochrian mode, mainly cos its only really usefull for mindless shredding
#10
if you being a diatonica *****, e and bb is the only diminished 5th in aeo, in dor its B and f if its another minor figure it out.

btw wesselbindt are you really a girl?
Originally Posted by jmac72187
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#12
i knew it!

btw are you really sexless since '92?
Originally Posted by jmac72187
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#13
^Dude who gives a f*ck! Take it to the pit. How about giving a useful answer to the OP.
#14
Harmonizing thirds and sixths sounds a lot better than fifths. But make sure you play along in the same scale, not just play the same thing 3 frets up.
#15
Quote by Shredworthy
Harmonizing thirds and sixths sounds a lot better than fifths.

That's all personal preference.

make sure you play along in the same scale, not just play the same thing 3 frets up.

Generally that will result in more melodic results, yes, but synthetic harmonization also has its uses.
#16
I used to think the guitar and bass player were unable to hear music from being percussionists for regular band, because they would always harmonize in 5ths, and it would sound like garbage. And they would always think it was so cool.

Alter your harmonizations so it is more like two melodic lines, and not two lines in exact parallel.
#17
Quote by wesselbindt
Are those called minor powerchords? Never heard that before.|

No. Power Chords are a root and a fifth, so they're by definition not major or minor. That's the whole point of power chords. There's no such thing as minor power chords. Those are simply minor chords without a fifth.

TS, It really doesn't matter. There should only be one situation where the fifth doesn't fit in the (diatonic) scale, and that's the diminished second in a minor scale (7th in a major scale).
Thomas hopes to not have offended anyone with this post. No responsibility whatsoever is taken for any spelling or grammar mistakes, should there be any.

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#18
^That may be the strict definition of power chords, but I've always liked major and minor voicings like this:

--------
-------
--------
-6--5----
-7--7----
-7--7----

Not power chords as such, but the perfect 4th at the start gives them a pretty "powerchordy" sound, and they do indeed sound pretty chunky and powerful and so can be used interchangeably with regular power chords. I call them major and minor powerchords
#19
Any two notes played at the same time is called a diad

Power chord only refers to a 1 5 diad. End of argument
#20
^ those arent power chords, just inversions.

power chord is the term used most generically for the root + 5th diad played all over. 2 notes played together is a diad (so technically a power chord isnt a chord, its a diad, we call it a chord for simplicity sakes) 3 different notes (or more) played together is a chord.

edit: tubatom beat me to it
#22
Quote by UltimateDud
do you know how to play minor powerchords?

|-------------------------------------------------
|-------------------------------------------------
|-------------------------------------------------
|--2---3---5------------------------------------ Minor third harmony
|--3---5---7------------------------------------ Root note
|-------------------------------------------------


The first one is a major third.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.