#1
Newbie here. I'm gonna tell a little story..I'd appreciate it if there are any comments/pointers.

Last week was my 21st birthday. Some family members were asking what I wanted as my gift (no, I'm not that into drinking ), but I just didn't have anything in mind.

Until..a thought came across my mind. I could just start playing the guitar. Some people you might laugh, but I played Guitar Hero 3 which exposed me to lots of classic rock songs. What a major upgrade from the junk you hear on pop radio nowadays. Early this month I bought GH Metallica and it was just awesome..feeling like you can play along the great songs. I figured playing the real guitar would be even cooler..

So then I went to a Guitar Center...long story short, I went home with a Squier Strat Pack. I didn't know UG at the time, so I took the salesperson's words.

Now this was all spontaneous.. the time passed from the thought of buying to the ACTUAL buying itself was about 3 hours.

The next night..I unwrapped my guitar then tuned it with the electric auto-tuner that came with the package. Then it came my first obstacle: I snapped my D string while tuning it . Had a good chuckle, then went back to the GC the next day to get the string replaced.

Once I got home I tuned the strings carefully, and managed to get it done. Felt somewhat proud myself. Oh and I also bought Hal Leonard's Guitar Methods book, which I thought was too much theory compared to the Keith Wyatt Fender DVD excerpt.

So here I am..practicing chords for the past 3-4 days, starting with Wyatt's tip on learning E5, D5, A5 power chords. I thought I got it done until the time came for Major Chords. Need to make my fretting real precise (haven't had any experience with musical instruments before). Also got a little confused on the various ways of fretting the A chord (3 fingers, 2 fingers, 1 finger?). Another thing is the annoying buzzing sound with the "deeper" chords, e.g. E5 that isn't there when I picked the individual strings.

My resources are: Fender's Getting Started on Electric, Hal Leonard's Guitar Methods book+DVD, JustinGuitar.com, and of course, UG.

Wish me luck!
Last edited by lildre at Jul 17, 2009,
#2
Good luck.
It can be tough at first, but it's worth it at the end.

The buzzing sound is fretbuzz.
I think you should google "Fretbuzz" for good guides on solving it.
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#3
Good luck!

and be CAREFUL on this site, the Pit is horribly cruel.
Last edited by fluffpuff999 at Jul 17, 2009,
#4
you'll get frustrated as hell but stick with it and within a few months (or years depending on how well you take to it) you'll have built up strength and muscle memory in your fingers from proper practice and it'll turn out to be one of the most satisfying hobbies out there.

pro tip; don't focus on alternate picking or downpicking exclusively, you'll pick up nasty habits like me.
#5
My short term goal would be to switch between the E,D,A chords as that's what most lessons teach first. I haven't read much into picking, although it's a little painful avoiding some strings that are not supposed to be picked.

@Simsimius
I did a google on fretbuzz, and it seems like there's nothing I can do about it. Probably it's just the cheap starterpack guitar. What's so annoying is the fretbuzz made me doubt my fretting fingers; I think it's pretty good but the buzz makes me want to keep changing to find the perfect sound.
#6
The buzz could either be fretbuzz or you not pressing the string(s) hard enough.
If it's fretbuzz, go to say GC and get your guitar's action (Height of the strings) lifted a little bit. Don't get it set too high, else it'll get harder to press in the strings for you.
#7


I'm glad you decided to join our elite group because you know... we are above everyone else in this world.

<_<
>_>

On a serious note: i wish you luck with this. While some ppl will make fun of you for having a squier starter pack i think it's a good thing that you got it since it won't be much of a loss if you decide to quit in the future. If you keep on going then eventually you'll develop your own taste in gear and know what to look for. Also your muscle memory will kick in pretty fast. It'll take just a couple of days for your fingers to start remembering where they go for certain chords and before you know it you won't even have to look down at the guitar for it. Playing at first will be frustrating and possibly even painful until you develop callouses on your finger but it's worth it.

Most important though, it's never too late to learn something new.



And before i forget - anything you need u can just go ahead and ask us.

EDIT:The buzz could either be fretbuzz or you not pressing the string(s) hard enough.
If it's fretbuzz, go to say GC and get your guitar's action (Height of the strings) lifted a little bit. Don't get it set too high, else it'll get harder to press in the strings for you.
Yeah it's probably fret buzz caused by the action (distance of strings from the guitar neck) or possibly even a relief problem (neck not properly bent; should be very slightly bowed so that it has a similar shape of a vibrating string so that it won't touch it). Both of these things can usually be easily fixed if the guitar isn't that badly constructed. I recommend having someone who knows how to do this to fix it for you since taking it to the shop can come out a bit expensive. I've personally done set ups for my guitars and friend's guitars/basses without any problems. All that is needed is a screwdriver and an allen wrench.

2nd EDIT: Try pressing the string closer to the fret (metal part on the guitar neck) without excess force to see if you still get the buzz. If you do then it'll be fretbuzz, otherwise you just have to fix your finger position and strength a little.
Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
Last edited by evening_crow at Jul 17, 2009,
#8
i started with the same pack as you. the instructional dvd with keith wyatt realy helped me.
that buzz happens to me too everytime i do an A chord. amp quality i supose...
can´t play songs in the key of A until i find another amp xD

about fingerings on the A chord: i find it easier to do with the pinky,ring and midle finger, instead of the ring,midle and first,but thats just me...

oh and don´t loose confidence when your fingers start to hurt. it will be a pain in the ass but in a week or two it will pass
#9
Quote by Antonio23
...about fingerings on the A chord: i find it easier to do with the pinky,ring and midle finger, instead of the ring,midle and first,but thats just me...

Yeah it all boils down to preference and that it doesn't hinder your ability to change chords or playing individual notes. I personally finger the A open chord with my index, middle, and ring finger which is the standard. However when i'm playing something moderately fast with distortion i sometimes just bar all 3 strings with my index instead. Same thing with the Em open chord. A friend used to use his index and middle finger while i used the middle and ring fingers, yet sometimes bar it with just the index when playing with distortion if it's easier and faster. With the G open chord some people (me) fret the high E on the 3rd fret with their pinky and the B string on the 3rd fret with the ring finger. Others leave the B string open and only fret the high E with the ring finger.

Originally Posted by evening_crow
Quoting yourself is cool.


WARNING: I kill threads.
#10
Good luck

21 isn't late - I started at 34

Chords are defined by notes not fingers - fret them with whatever fingers are most convenient. You'll find you'll fret the same chord differently depending on context (if there are similar shaped chords before or after it you'll find yourself fingering it in the way that makes it easiest to switch chords)

One piece of advice - try and learn the notes of the neck, and learn bits of theory as you go along - like as you're learning chords, learn how they are constructed. That way you're only learning a small bit of theory at a time, and its the bit thats relevant to what you're doing.

Have fun

Edit: Has anybody warned you yet that guitar is addictive?
#11
Quote by lildre
My short term goal would be to switch between the E,D,A chords as that's what most lessons teach first. I haven't read much into picking, although it's a little painful avoiding some strings that are not supposed to be picked.


The best thing to do here is to MUTE the strings with your fretting hand [so your fingers are lightly touching [NOT freting] the strings you don't want].
That way, you can strum them and the strings you don't want will remain silent.
Sunn O))):
Quote by Doppelgänger
You could always just sleep beside your refrigerator.

Guitar:
- Ibanez S670FM w/ JB
- Fender 'Lite Ash' Stratocaster
- Fender '72 Deluxe Telecaster
- Arbiter LP Jr. Doublecut
Amp:
- Laney VC15

'72 Tele Appreciation Group
RIP DIO
#15
Welcome to the wondeful world of creating music!!!

Sounds like you are off to a good start for learning. Once you learn your chords you can always check out the tutorials on the sight that other members have made. Freepower has a lot of great videos to help you learn things.

BTW, if you like the Dmaj chord, wait until you learn the Dminor chord....it's the coolest sounding chord..IMO.
#16
Definately never too late to start. I started at 31. Although I think it's a little harder to learn the older you get. You learn so much faster when you're young...

It is definately a great hobby, you'll become the life of the party.

Practice Practice Practice, don't give up and play through the pain in your fingers. It will pass and you'll develop calouses on your fingertips.

Like Bryan Adams said, "played it till my fingers bled"..

I would suggest learning the Major and Minor Pentatonic Scale.
That for me was the single most helpful thing I ever learned.
It can help you with Picking a solo or melody, and it can help you construct chords.
I can come up with some wierd chords and I don't even know what they're called. But I know they are at least musically correct chords, because I'm using notes from the scale.

2001 Ernie Ball Music Man Axis Super Sport
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Last edited by jonmo1 at Jul 17, 2009,
#17
Pretty much what everyone else has said, it's never to late to start. I started just a few months before turning 21 myself, comming up on almost a year of playing now. So don't feel like your the only one around who decided to pick it up later than sooner.

And one tip I can offer is to just keep your playing varied. Be it exercises, songs, or just jamming. If you change what your doing often enough so you don't get bored but aren't all over the place as well you'll find yourself being able to play hours on end and have a blast while doing it.
#18
Thanks everyone!

When I opened up my Guitar Method book I was doing the E F G note on the first string. Had to do some extra thinking translating the scales..until I got bored and decided to pop the Wyatt DVD and learn chords instead. I might be wrong but I think it's much more encouraging to learn chords first.

If anyone's familiar with the Fender DVD, you'd know that Keith teaches how to do the 3 string E A D power chords. With only 3 strings played I realized that I "cheated" and had the 3rd finger touching the 3rd string for the E pwr chord. This made fretting the E major a little tougher (now the 3rd string has to sound clear).

As for the fretbuzz, I think it's only there when I strum a little harder. The sound was clear if I strum it soft.
Last edited by lildre at Jul 17, 2009,