#1
I have a question for all you intermediate to advanced players:

I'm a relatively beginner guitarist, and decided to study music theory inside out before diving into actually learning single songs. I still practice scales and stuff everyday, but all of my studying, for the most part, has been learning all the theory I can.

My question is; how important of a role, if any, did knowing theory play into your progression of learning guitar?
#2
well as for progression and what songs that I can play right this second, none, it didnt matter at all. The music theory that I know now just lets me write my own stuff, it didnt realy help me in my playing
#3
Yeah, I understand how it does zero for technique. I guess I was moreso wondering if it were more common for beginners to learn theory inside/out, or just jump into learning songs.

I feel like I would rather know the fret board inside out, before just memerizing songs
#4
Quote by Rellique
I have a question for all you intermediate to advanced players:

I'm a relatively beginner guitarist, and decided to study music theory inside out before diving into actually learning single songs. I still practice scales and stuff everyday, but all of my studying, for the most part, has been learning all the theory I can.

My question is; how important of a role, if any, did knowing theory play into your progression of learning guitar?


Learn theory as you progress. If you're still keen on learning theory more than songs, then study more theory than songs. If you're not keeping it fun (I don't know if you are or not) then you won't enjoy learning theory or anything. So instead, find something you're learning in theory, and learn how to apply it.

Like... If you're learning how to build chords, inversions, alternate chords, find a relatively easy song that uses just chords, and find new ways to play it but with different chord voicings.

You could also learn how to write a song in every key to apply the theory.

However, the theory I've learned now has helped me with a lot of the more technical stuff I've been learning (Virtuosos), and like Guitar AXL said, it's helped me write a few small pieces here and there. Also, it has trained my musical ear and I've been able to pick up simpler songs a little bit easier by ear.
#5
For me, theory helped a lot, because I like to understand things, and I remember things better if I understand them - for example learning chords was a lot easier if I knew how they were constructed, and I didn't have to learn so may chord shapes as I could change a major chord to a minor by changing a 3 to a b3. Same with scales - I didn't learn them as shapes, I learnt them as notes and intervals, which makes it easy to play different types of scales.

I think you should learn songs too though - apart from being fun they help reinforce what you are learning, so if you've learnt how to construct open chords learn a simple song that uses open chords, if you've learnt a scale start to improvise with it, if you've learnt to harmonise a scale make up some chord progressions or write a song. You learn different things from learning other peoples songs than you do from writing your own, so both are important if you want to be a well rounded musician. So are chips. Chips and beer

If you're practicing scales don't limit yourself to playing them straight up and down - once you know where your fingers are going play them in different patterns - its more useful for when you actually want to use them to make music.
#6
Theory is great to know at least the basics of, cause it's super helpful when writing your own stuff or when playing with other people. My theoretical knowledge of music is pretty piss poor, but i understand rhythms, melodies, tempos and all that good stuff. I think those concepts are the most important.
#7
theory is one of those things that isn't necessary per se, but it will definitely open doors for you musically. i think it's good to practice your technique, learning/writing songs and learning/incorporating theory at the same time. obviously you can't do all three at the same time at all times, but i think learning as much theory as you can before moving on to anything else taken literally would mean that you'd never stop learning theory
"... and on either side of the river was the tree of life, with its twelve kinds of fruit, yielding its fruit each month. The leaves of this tree were for the healing of nations.
#8
Does any know of a good website or a book that explains theory brilliantly?
#9
Quote by Phumfeinz
Does any know of a good website or a book that explains theory brilliantly?


the crusades articles help a lot (Someone else supply the link? I can't find it currently). Also, the musicians talk section of the forum talks about it and theres a sticky there that explains a lot of theory stuff.

Start with the crusades and take each lesson slowly and only move on once you understand the first lesson.
#10
Thanks, I'll look into it. I've had a look around the internet but there's just so many sites out there I don't know where to start.
#11
Sure, theory's vastly important - but it's not playing guitar. Learning a full song to performance standard teaches you things you can't learn in books.

Dedication, attention to detail, pride.

Learn a few full songs!
#12
for ear training it does wonders being able to hear something and analyze it in your head can help you alot