#1
I have a used Gibson Les Paul Classic. Minimally used. The frets are as tall
as buildings. I am extremely skilled in handy work and believe I can file down
the frets and polish them. I was thinking I could take them down minimally
at first. String the guitar, lower the action and see how it looks and plays.
Depending on where it is I could do this a second time.

Has anyone ever done this... and I am talking about all frets?
Any threads here on this?
Anyone know where I can get a specific file used for this?
I was going to build a dremel with a welded gaurd to keep me
from going to low into the fret.

What would be the cost if I paid someone to file down and polish my frets.
About 1/16 give or take a ew 1000ths... HA!
#2
This is a bad idea. You are more likely to ruin the frets if you don't know what you're doing. Your best bet would be to get it entirely refretted with frets that you prefer. Also, with a dremel or a file, you will leave scratches in the frets that your strings could get caught on.
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#3
Yeah, fuzzle...? has a point. Filing frets down, if not done COMPLETELY PERFECTLY will cause some noise you don't want, especially when doing a vibrato on your strings. You'll probably get a sound similar to when you strum a fret too far back on the neck and it vibrates and rings on the fret. Replacing would be a whole heck of a lot easier and shouldn't be a problem at all if your good with handiwork.
#4
The only way to successfully lower your frets is with a leveling tool that will contact many frets at the same time. It is imperative that you keep all of the frets the same height. You can use a flat ground bar and sandpaper, a flat file, a radiused sanding block that matches your fretboard radius, a flat oilstone, something like that. But technique is important, you want to maintain your radius and avoid filing your frets into some erratic shape.

You will need to recrown the frets afterwards to remove the flat tops you'll create. You can get custom made files for doing this from places like Stewart Macdonald.

Basically what you're doing is a fret level/recrown but with the purpose of lowering the frets - not removing wear. You should look for more info on this operation and make sure you know what you're doing before you attempt it.

You could probably take it to a repair person to do this for 100-200 dollars.
#5
Quote by Metalhead_28
The only way to successfully lower your frets is with a leveling tool that will contact many frets at the same time. It is imperative that you keep all of the frets the same height. You can use a flat ground bar and sandpaper, a flat file, a radiused sanding block that matches your fretboard radius, a flat oilstone, something like that. But technique is important, you want to maintain your radius and avoid filing your frets into some erratic shape.

You will need to recrown the frets afterwards to remove the flat tops you'll create. You can get custom made files for doing this from places like Stewart Macdonald.

Basically what you're doing is a fret level/recrown but with the purpose of lowering the frets - not removing wear. You should look for more info on this operation and make sure you know what you're doing before you attempt it.

You could probably take it to a repair person to do this for 100-200 dollars.
This ^

Add to that, polishing after leveling/crowning.

This is not a difficult operation and can be learned by an amateur. However it is slow, tedious work. I highly recommend learning to do this, but NOT on a Gibson as your first project.

Meadows
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