#1
I have a squier strat...and well i know its not the best guitar ever but im having problems with sustaining a note...it looses it power pretty quickly...i wanted to know its the guitar itself or my amp which is a frontman 15G. And what can i do to make it have more sustain?
#2
I used to use that same pack when I started out.
In short: you can't.
You might be able so squeeze some extra juice out of it if you turn it up a bit, but I wouldn't expect anything fantastic.
#4
Quote by KarlF94
so is the amp or guitar responsible for the sustain?

Guitar...

The sound comes from the guitar, the amp just makes it louder and shapes the tone some.

2001 Ernie Ball Music Man Axis Super Sport
2001 MIM Standard Strat
Peavey Classic 30 112 Combo.
My Gear
#5
if it doesn't sustain well when played acoustically, it wont when played plugged in. Blocking the tremolo might give you better sustain.
02 MiM Telecaster-----\__Digitech Whammy__TS-10__535q__DE-7__6505+ 112
91 Heartfield Talon II-/
#6
its guitar
you'd buy a better one than spend money on upgrading it, they dont use best woods for squiers. good wood makes big difference in sustain
#8
Blocking the tremolo might give you better sustain.


^ +1

If you don't use the tremolo (which you probably don't, otherwise you would mention it not staying in tune), you can block the tremolo to give it a more solid connection to the body of the guitar.

The sustain comes from the vibration of strings transferring into the wood in the Neck and Body of the guitar. And when the wood of the guitar starts vibrating, it passes back into the strings. Kind of like a feedback Loop.

Having a Tremolo reduces this effect for 2 reasons..

1. It is NOT solidly attached to the body of the guitar with screws or bolts. It is loosely attached with springs and pivot points. Making it more difficult for the string vibration to transfer into the body of the guitar.

2. Those springs absorb the vibrations of the strings. (some like this sound better, that's personal preference though).

You can search youtube or even UG website for howto's on how to block the tremolo. It's not too difficult.

2001 Ernie Ball Music Man Axis Super Sport
2001 MIM Standard Strat
Peavey Classic 30 112 Combo.
My Gear
Last edited by jonmo1 at Jul 17, 2009,
#10
How do you block off a strat tremelo which is already resting on the body? Theres no cavity to block off.

Maybe I have just a had a floyde tremelo for to long but I don't think its possible to block a strat tremelo or bridge...whatever they are called.
#11
I claim no responsibility for your guitar, block your tremolo at your own risk...

Just had to Cover My A**. Seriousely, it's not difficult and extremely low risk of any damage..

loosen all strings on the guitar till they flop around like speghetti.
Remove the Tremolo Cavity Cover on the Back Side of the Guitar body. Probably 6 screws on a Strat.
Tighten the Screws (evenly) on the Claw until the bridge doesn't flop around anymore, and is solidly held against the body of the guitar.

Now, measure the distance (on both sides) between the Sustain Block (part that strings go through) and the wood of the guitar body.

Cut 2 pieces of wood that will fit in those 2 gaps.
They should fit in those gaps snugly. Not too tight.

The right snugness would be a couple LIGHT taps with a SMALL hammer to get them in.
I mean EXTREMELY LIGHT taps with SMALL hammer.
If you have to exert any real effort to get the wood to fit, it's too big.

You must leave at least one spring attached, for electrical connectivity, you can remove the rest.

Once they're in, you're done. Retune the strings, replace the tremolo cavity cover
You may need to adjust the saddles to regain the correct string height.

Here's a picture of a blocked tremolo
http://www.fretnotguitarrepair.com/images/tremoloblocked.jpg

Hope that helps.

2001 Ernie Ball Music Man Axis Super Sport
2001 MIM Standard Strat
Peavey Classic 30 112 Combo.
My Gear
Last edited by jonmo1 at Jul 17, 2009,
#13
why not try raising the action, if the strings are allowed to vibnrate more then you have more sustain.
#14
Turn the amp up and learn vibrato. You should be able to sustain a note infinitely under those conditions. Another thing is to add some weight to the headstock but that'll only help acoustically and it's not as good as vibrato and feedback.
#15
Quote by srob7001
How do you block off a strat tremelo which is already resting on the body? Theres no cavity to block off.

Maybe I have just a had a floyde tremelo for to long but I don't think its possible to block a strat tremelo or bridge...whatever they are called.


I was thinking the same thing. You can block off a non-floating trem?
#16
Quote by MetalHead916
I was thinking the same thing. You can block off a non-floating trem?


A non floating Trem is just a trem that has not been set up to float.
Most Trems can be setup to float (at least strat style and floyds).
Most just choose to have it NOT float for better tuning stability.

And yes, you can block off any strat style or floyd tremolo.
And the advantage is a more solid connection between bridge and body = better sustain.

2001 Ernie Ball Music Man Axis Super Sport
2001 MIM Standard Strat
Peavey Classic 30 112 Combo.
My Gear
#17
Quote by jonmo1
A non floating Trem is just a trem that has not been set up to float.
Most Trems can be setup to float (at least strat style and floyds).
Most just choose to have it NOT float for better tuning stability.

And yes, you can block off any strat style or floyd tremolo.
And the advantage is a more solid connection between bridge and body = better sustain.


I knew you could do it to floyde bridges, just never heard of it being done on a strat....and i used to own one. My bridge always sat on the body.

But I saw the pics and how to so i guess it can be done.

With a strat, if your bridge isn't touching the body just tighten the springs so its not pulled forward and not sitting on body of guitar.
#18
Quote by jonmo1
A non floating Trem is just a trem that has not been set up to float.
Most Trems can be setup to float (at least strat style and floyds).
Most just choose to have it NOT float for better tuning stability.

And yes, you can block off any strat style or floyd tremolo.
And the advantage is a more solid connection between bridge and body = better sustain.


Oh OK, thanks for clarifying that.