#1
I feel kind a stupid for posting this in a seperate thread, but I couldn't find the answer for it anywhere else....

Anyway, i was wondering if, when you solder with pickups, what metals could be used for the job? I know the most common is solder, but i haven't seen anywhere else where it says not to use any other type of metal and only using solder....

Thanks!
"My name is Forrest, Forrest Gump. People call me Forrest Gump"
#3
use solder.
unless you wanna freakin weld your pickups to your pots.
( if anyone is skilled enuff, i dare you to weld your guitar together... that would be epic.)
Quote by Scowmoo




You deserved this, Matt.
#4
^

but thanks, I guess I'll stick to solder if no one else disagrees
"My name is Forrest, Forrest Gump. People call me Forrest Gump"
#5
ITT: the blonde leading the blonde.

Solder isn't a material, it's a technique. The alloy used for electronic soldering varies, but has three common properties. Low melting temperature, good electrical continuity, and good adhesion to the metals and alloys used in electronic components. Generally, tin is the major component and since RoHS lead has been out of favor in soldering alloys.

In the soldering process, only the alloy used to join the two parts is liquid. Contrast this with welding where the weld alloy mixes and fuses with the metal of the parts themselves.

"Solder" (actually soldering alloys) are what they are because they work. Other metals aren't used because they don't achieve the desired result. Either the melting temperature is too high, the electrical conductivity is too low, or the adhesion is poor.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.
#6
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
ITT: the blonde leading the blonde.

Solder isn't a material, it's a technique. The alloy used for electronic soldering varies, but has three common properties. Low melting temperature, good electrical continuity, and good adhesion to the metals and alloys used in electronic components. Generally, tin is the major component and since RoHS lead has been out of favor in soldering alloys.

In the soldering process, only the alloy used to join the two parts is liquid. Contrast this with welding where the weld alloy mixes and fuses with the metal of the parts themselves.

"Solder" (actually soldering alloys) are what they are because they work. Other metals aren't used because they don't achieve the desired result. Either the melting temperature is too high, the electrical conductivity is too low, or the adhesion is poor.


ahh.. thanks. so, basically, to solder pickups i should be using 60/40 Sn/Pb or would anything else work better or as good as that?
"My name is Forrest, Forrest Gump. People call me Forrest Gump"
#7
63/37 is a slightly better alloy and you want it in wire form with a resin core.
Acid core is a definite no.
Solid wire solder would be annoying to use. You'd have to apply the flux separately.


also, due to RoHS, you'll have a harder time finding either of those alloys.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.
Last edited by SomeoneYouKnew at Jul 17, 2009,
#8
^ alright thank you. all my questions have been answered.....

By you

"My name is Forrest, Forrest Gump. People call me Forrest Gump"
#9
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
ITT: the blonde leading the blonde.

Solder isn't a material, it's a technique. The alloy used for electronic soldering varies, but has three common properties. Low melting temperature, good electrical continuity, and good adhesion to the metals and alloys used in electronic components. Generally, tin is the major component and since RoHS lead has been out of favor in soldering alloys.

In the soldering process, only the alloy used to join the two parts is liquid. Contrast this with welding where the weld alloy mixes and fuses with the metal of the parts themselves.

"Solder" (actually soldering alloys) are what they are because they work. Other metals aren't used because they don't achieve the desired result. Either the melting temperature is too high, the electrical conductivity is too low, or the adhesion is poor.


Heh.
This post answers your question.
Quote by letsgocoyote
No I'm not Jesus. I would aspire to be though. I think under circumstances he would let you pay less if you needed to.