#1
I got a new Strat neck a few months ago. I put it on and I've been playing it, but it's been pretty crappy. (can't afford a professional setup). I've tightened the truss rod as far as I can, but it still curves inward. I'm using light gauge strings, so I don't think there is too much string tension. I guess the only way to fix this is to use taller frets where the strings are.

Thanks for any ideas!
#2
Quote by capitalistpig
I got a new Strat neck a few months ago. I put it on and I've been playing it, but it's been pretty crappy. (can't afford a professional setup). I've tightened the truss rod as far as I can, but it still curves inward. I'm using light gauge strings, so I don't think there is too much string tension. I guess the only way to fix this is to use taller frets where the strings are.

Thanks for any ideas!



A neck is supposed to be curved inwards, is what I've been told.
Quote by consecutive e
Let me be the first to say.

Pics or gtfo.


Quote by CaptDin
Guitar Center - because someone has to trick people into buying Line 6 amps.


[img]http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=77198&stc=1[/img]
#5
Your neck is over-tightened.

Tightening the truss rod (turning it clockwise) makes the neck curve more inward to counter the string tension. Loosening it (turning it counter-clockwise) makes the rod more "slack", for lack of a better term, and curve more outwards.

Typically, a well-setup guitar will have a bit of concave relief (bowing out away from the strings) but not too much.

Remember to adjust in small increments and wait for a while (I'd wait a day) and check where the neck is at. Retune and intonate when you're done.
#6
exactly what pacman has said.....but i`ll add......

always look down the neck from the headstock never the bridge, and the bow should become noticeable around the 7th - 9th fret.