#1
Ok, I've had about 3-4 lessons about guitar, and we've learned a bit of musical theory, scales and whatnot. However, seeing as how he's leaving for about 2 weeks, I've got to ask you guys a question.
We started a little bluesy jam for about 15 minutes or so, as he told me to lead on the A minor pentatonic. While I was doing this, he was playing the A minor and F(barre) chords.
And it left me wondering, how did the F chord fit into the A minor pentatonic lead? Some of the notes didn't match up but my lead sounded perfect on the chords he was playing. Anyone care to give a beginner some insight into this?
#2
Quote by Pyrotechie
Ok, I've had about 3-4 lessons about guitar, and we've learned a bit of musical theory, scales and whatnot. However, seeing as how he's leaving for about 2 weeks, I've got to ask you guys a question.
We started a little bluesy jam for about 15 minutes or so, as he told me to lead on the A minor pentatonic. While I was doing this, he was playing the A minor and F(barre) chords.
And it left me wondering, how did the F chord fit into the A minor pentatonic lead? Some of the notes didn't match up but my lead sounded perfect on the chords he was playing. Anyone care to give a beginner some insight into this?


well he played chords in the key of Am, and you played a solo using notes in the key of Am.

That's the general idea.

If you click on the "Major and minor scales harmonized in triads" link in my sig, and look up the key of Am, you'll see the chords that are in Am, and will the the Am - F that he was playing.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 17, 2009,
#3
yea... isn't F in the Am scale? I though the Am and Cmaj were all the whole tones.
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#4
Think about what you learned with the scales - he was chordin' using notes from the scale you were playing in, in this case Am.

If you were playing a solo based on the C major scale, he'd have played chords from that scale to complement your lead part.
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#5
Quote by MacMan2001
Think about what you learned with the scales - he was chordin' using notes from the scale you were playing in, in this case Am.

If you were playing a solo based on the C major scale, he'd have played chords from that scale to complement your lead part.

I guess this just sounds wrong on paper.
I'm thinking that since the Am scale has notes that the F chord does not, it should sound wrong when it doesn't. But, nevermind, I'm pretty sure it's based on the key now.
#6
Quote by Pyrotechie
I guess this just sounds wrong on paper.
I'm thinking that since the Am scale has notes that the F chord does not, it should sound wrong when it doesn't. But, nevermind, I'm pretty sure it's based on the key now.


i think you may have thought a little too far into it. the f chord has notes that don't appear in the Am scale, but that's ok because F is the root of the chord and F appears in the Am scale. and depending on if the F chord is major or minor it may or may not fit anymore. i dont know which it's supposed to be because i don't really know theory that well... but i'll guess and say F major for ****s and giggles...
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#7


An F major triad is the notes F A C, all those notes are contained in the A minor scale. Any F major chord is just going to contain those notes, they may be repeated or in different octaves but it's still just those notes.

A minor pentatonic is just the natural minor scale missing 2 notes, remember you don't derive chords from the pentatonic scale, you derive them from the major scale. The minor pentatonic isn't a separate entity as such, it's really just a different way of playing the natural minor scale avoiding the less consonant notes. Really you're still using the natural minor scale, you're just not using all the notes
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#8
Quote by konfyouzd
i think you may have thought a little too far into it. the f chord has notes that don't appear in the Am scale, but that's ok because F is the root of the chord and F appears in the Am scale. and depending on if the F chord is major or minor it may or may not fit anymore. i dont know which it's supposed to be because i don't really know theory that well... but i'll guess and say F major for ****s and giggles...


No it doesn't, its diatonic to the key.
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