#1
So, since summer started, i've been bored out of my mind and did some stupid things, one of them being putting my guitar infront of my speaker hoping the vibration will age my guitar

i positioned the speaker right infront of my soundhole(around 1 inch away) and put my volume on 35/50 and went to watch Harry Potter. When i came back, it seemed like my guitar DID indeed have a warmer tone.

I dont know if its just coincidence but do you guys think it works?
#2
sorry, but it was almost certainly just positive thinking. Theoretically it makes sense if your speakers were to be playing with the exact frequency and tone that your guitar would be playing at so that it would age faster,simulating the effect of someone playing. But that would literally take months of non-stop speakering (to simulate years of playing) to have any noticeable effect. But again, that's just theoretical.

Whether it would work in real life or not doesn't really matter though, because a 2 hour dose of soundwaves while you were watching a movie wouldn't be near enough to change the tone noticeably.
Composer of Scores for Film/Video Games/TV/and More!
Contact me if you have a project that you need music of any style for!
#3
i cant see a way the guitar would have noticeably warmer tone from this
unless its magic
really
it doesnt change wood structure or anything else
#5
Quote by Anathetic
So, since summer started, i've been bored out of my mind and did some stupid things, one of them being putting my guitar infront of my speaker hoping the vibration will age my guitar

i positioned the speaker right infront of my soundhole(around 1 inch away) and put my volume on 35/50 and went to watch Harry Potter. When i came back, it seemed like my guitar DID indeed have a warmer tone.

I dont know if its just coincidence but do you guys think it works?


wait, forget the guitar


he watched HARRY POTTER!?


how old are you 8?


im gunna look really stupid if they are
"Guitar is tactile, It's about how you play it"
- Joe Bonamassa

#7
Theoretically, it does work. Companies like Alvarez use this technique during the wood's drying and aging process in order to open up the wood a bit more. It's not magic, it's just how wood naturally reacts to vibrations.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
#8
Quote by TomG10-7
wait, forget the guitar


he watched HARRY POTTER!?


how old are you 8?


im gunna look really stupid if they are



Harry potter and the half blooded prince..

i read the novel, and i quite enjoy the movies.

Hell, i even went to watch UP in 3d the day it came out, it was a great movie, but i mean if it was like G.I.JOE, fine i understand watching that is childish, but harry potter series are phenomenal novels/movies.
#9
Quote by captivate
Theoretically, it does work. Companies like Alvarez use this technique during the wood's drying and aging process in order to open up the wood a bit more. It's not magic, it's just how wood naturally reacts to vibrations.

But not in 2 hours.
The Alvarez aging process for their mid-end guitars has them in the aging room, which is used to dry the wood and treat it with sound, for months at a time. The wood used for really high end guitars are in there for considerably longer. I read somewhere that their top guitars are made from wood that have been treated for over 12 years.

2 hours won't make a difference that is noticeable, which is what I read the question as...not if the process in itself made sense.
Composer of Scores for Film/Video Games/TV/and More!
Contact me if you have a project that you need music of any style for!