#1
my friend is convinced that there are, but i've never seen one and it seems impractical
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#2
no, i think your friend is mistaking the 3 bass strings on classical guitars as a steel string.
#3
No, I really doubt it...the contstruction and bracing wouldn't allow that to happen and still sound good.

Out of curiosity, does he mean that you can have a set of nylon then take them off and put on a set of steel strings...or does he mean you can have half steel half nylon? Either way I doubt they exist, but I sorta wanna know.
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#4
Quote by Anathetic
no, i think your friend is mistaking the 3 bass strings on classical guitars as a steel string.


yeah this is what he was thinking of, i had to convinve him tho haha
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#5
The three bass strings on a Nylon stringed guitar are still made of nylon. They're just nylon cores with a bit of metal wrapping around them.

Also, no. It is not possible to create a good guitar that can use both nylon and steel strings. Nylon stringed guitars get about 60lbs of string tension at most. Steel stringed guitars are designed to take about 150-180lbs of pull. The bracing on steel stringed guitars are MUCH thicker than nylon stringed guitars.
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#6
I know all the technical reasons this is not possible, but this thread has inspired me to try to find a way to build a 12 string guitar with one set of strings that are nylon and another set that are steel. Again, I know its not possible for that to work and still hear the nylon strings without the guitar folding in on itself...but it would sound really cool, and so I am trying to figure out a way it would work.

So thanks to this thread for giving me a challenge that I am gonna fail epically at :P

EDIT: now I feel self-conscious of the idea, because I know its not gonna happen :P
But seriously, I'd buy one if they existed...and if I figured out a way to do it, then I would have a new and unique product to sell :P
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Last edited by ReChord at Jul 18, 2009,
#7
The only way I can think of that could potentially work is if the steel strings are restricted to .009's at most. The tension on those are closer to 110-120lbs. Also, Just to correct myself, but Nylon strings are actually closer to 80-90lbs of tension or so. 60lbs would be the low tension nylons. Most people I know use high or super high tension for nylon strings to get more volume.
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#8
I know there are some, but they sound terrible either way.
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#9
Arn't some guitars designed for flemenco capable of the tention of steel strings?
I should think the few classical guitars with a truss rod could stand low Gauge steel strings.
But i sure as hell wouldn't suggest it.

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Last edited by Jiggzy.UK at Jul 18, 2009,
#10
Yeah the flamenco guitars with a heavy truss rod may be able to stand extremely thin steel strings...like .09s or .08s... for a very small amount of time, but they would still put stupid amounts of pressure on the guitar that it wasn't built for, and it would get a really bad tone. Even if it doesn't seem to cause damage right off, it is ravaging the guitar and will mess it up over time (though most times right away.)

Have you ever strummed a chord on a 0 or 00 sized guitar REALLY hard and gotten that really spread and blocky and, well, just bad guitar tone? That's because the strings were vibrating so much that the guitar couldn't absorb all the vibrations of the different notes at that intensity and thus could not vibrate correctly. The note vibrations interfered with each other, creating a very muddy and garbled sound. That is what would happen if you somehow got the .08's on a heavily trussed classical, because it was designed to accept much less vibration.

Doubt most classicals or flamenco built guitars could handle even .08s anyway, and even those would give a huge amount of damage to your guitar.

That's why as soon as someone asks if they can put a steel strings on their classical, which happens all the time, they have at least 20 replies posted within 5 minutes of the original post saying to never even think about it again :P
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Last edited by ReChord at Jul 18, 2009,
#11
Also the scales are different lengths and you would likely have intonation problems.

In my earlier days I once tried to put nylon strings on my dreadnought. Did NOT work, every single string broke.
#12
Quote by Blaster Bob
Also the scales are different lengths and you would likely have intonation problems.

In my earlier days I once tried to put nylon strings on my dreadnought. Did NOT work, every single string broke.


You just strummed it once and they all broke?

Ahh damm mate, mustve been annoying to waste the money.

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#13
Quote by Jiggzy.UK
You just strummed it once and they all broke?

Ahh damm mate, mustve been annoying to waste the money.


No, they all broke as I was trying to tune them up to pitch. I was pretty sure that would happen after the first one broke, but I kept trying the other strings because I at least wanted to know what ONE string sounded like.

strings are so cheap, why worry about it when you spend as much money to fuel your car to get to the store?