#1
So I want to start making arpeggios and am kind of stuck. I can find a bunch of chords online but I wanted to add hammer ons and pull offs to the arpeggios.

I know you need to use "5ths" and "3rds" and other "-ths". But how many frets are these "-th" things?

Could someone just tell me how many steps each of these are?
Obviously Fassa.
#2
Quote by Rock In Rio
So I want to start making arpeggios and am kind of stuck. I can find a bunch of chords online but I wanted to add hammer ons and pull offs to the arpeggios.

I know you need to use "5ths" and "3rds" and other "-ths". But how many frets are these "-th" things?

Could someone just tell me how many steps each of these are?


1. Learn the notes all over the fretboard.


2. Learn the notes in the arpeggios you want to make, e.g. A minor arpeggio has the notes A, C, and E. Now use those notes to make arpeggios.
#3
Thanks. Ive been looking for a pic or something like that. Can someone tell me how many steps that the spacings like 5th's and 3rd's are?
Obviously Fassa.
#5
Quote by Rock In Rio
Thanks. Ive been looking for a pic or something like that. Can someone tell me how many steps that the spacings like 5th's and 3rd's are?


Just look at the picture and figure it out for yourself, e.g:

A to C is a minor third.
E-string, 5th fret: A
E-string, 8th fret: C
So you have to go three frets up for a minor third.

C to E is a major third.
E-string, 8th fret: C
E-string, 12th fret: E
So you have to go four frets up for a major third.

A to E (Still A minor) is a perfect fifth.
E-string, 5th fret: A
E-string, 12th fret: E ... or A-string, 7th fret.
So you have to go seven frets up for a perfect fifth (perfect fifth is major third+minor third = 3+4 = 7).
#6
Quote by pwrmax
Look up sweep picking, if you need shapes for arpeggios.


I don't think one should learn sweeping until he understands the construction of arpeggios.


Quote by Rock in Rio
Thanks. Ive been looking for a pic or something like that. Can someone tell me how many steps that the spacings like 5th's and 3rd's are?

It depends on the key signature.

Take the key of A for example:
1. The major third of A is C#, or 4 semitones (that's 4 frets)
2. The minor third is C natural, or 3 semitones
3. The diminished third is B natural, or 2 semitones

Also in the key of A:
1. The major fifth is E, or 7 semitones.
2. The augmented fifth is F natural, or 8 semitones
3. The diminished fifth is Eb/D#, or 6 semitones

Hope that helps a little.
#7
Quote by Geldin
Take the key of A for example:
1. The major third of A is C#, or 4 semitones (that's 4 frets)
2. The minor third is C natural, or 3 semitones
3. The diminished third is B natural, or 2 semitones

Also in the key of A:
1. The major fifth is E, or 7 semitones.
2. The augmented fifth is F natural, or 8 semitones
3. The diminished fifth is Eb/D#, or 6 semitones
+1
Quote by Rock In Rio
So I want to start making arpeggios and am kind of stuck. I can find a bunch of chords online but I wanted to add hammer ons and pull offs to the arpeggios.

I know you need to use "5ths" and "3rds" and other "-ths". But how many frets are these "-th" things?
Right the "-ths"

I'll use Am as an example key

The notes in the key of Am are A, B, C, D, E, F, & G
Am starting from the open A string
     A  B  C  D  E  F  G  A
e|----------------------------|
B|----------------------------|
G|---------------------0--2---|
D|------------0--2--3---------|
A|---0--2--3------------------|
E|----------------------------|
Am starting from 5th fret E string
     A  B  C  D  E  F  G  A
e|----------------------------|
B|----------------------------|
G|----------------------------|
D|---------------------5--7---|
A|------------5--7--8---------|
E|---5--7--8------------------|
The first or 'root note' is A the second is B the third is C and so on. This goes on up to the second A which is the octave. Then the next B is a ninth the C is a tenth and so on

My explanation is pretty basic and rambling but you get the idea (I hope)

As for what type of second or third etc I reccomend you learn more theory: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?s=The+crusade&w=columns
.
Last edited by Nietsche at Jul 18, 2009,
#8
I advise you to learn music theory. It would open up your playing, and help you construct arpeggios easily.
#9
Quote by Geldin
I don't think one should learn sweeping until he understands the construction of arpeggios.

I mean looking up the basic shapes used for sweeping, not necessarily to actually sweep them. It is a good idea to learn the theory behind it first though.
#10
The Crusade Columns: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?s=crusade&w=columns

If you have any questions then ask away. These will most likely answer all of your current questions, including the one about 3rds and 5ths (which are called intervals, by the way. They're covered in part two of those columns, but I suggest you start with part one.).
i don't know why i feel so dry
#11
Quote by Geldin
I don't think one should learn sweeping until he understands the construction of arpeggios.

No knowledge of arpeggios is needed to sweep. And learning a technique has got little to do with music theory. And some advanced players don't know how to construct arpeggios, but are most definately at a level where sweeping is totally ok to do.

TS, you might indeed want to read up on your music theory. I think a lot of people will agree when I say you should read the crusade column.

edit:
^oh look at that, I got beaten to the punch.