#1
Yo I'm a guitar player that has been playing for 2 years and now I have a band but the problem is that my drummer wants solos and I have fast enough hands and all but just don't know how to make the notes flow with scales.


What are some important scales to learn?


I will look them up and practice them hard.


Also, are arpeggios part of scales?
#6
I have one piece of advice...fast doesn't mean much. You don't need to play fast to make good solos...focus on more melodic, tasteful solos. I personally play in the Dorian mode. Good for solos. If you're playing metal though...you're beyond help. Learn the melodic scales and have fun.
#7
i play a lot of hardrock stuff and i already know modes and all that, but what would i use to play for softer more ballady kind of things


srry for kinda taking the spotlight esparza but this felt like an appropriate thread to ask this
#8
arpeggios are the notes of a chord played consecutively and individually. but ya learn the minor scale too
#9
Use the A Dorian scales. If you look at my improv solo(Kangaroo Tears intro) in my profile(it sucks I know, the flat note was an accident lol) you can get a sort of an idea...I suck though lol.

EDITkay, i'll say I suck at improvising. I can't down my guitar playing completely when I actually compose something.

EDIT AGAIN:THIS AT ROCKZILLA
Last edited by Soroki at Jul 18, 2009,
#10
Quote by Soroki
I have one piece of advice...fast doesn't mean much. You don't need to play fast to make good solos...focus on more melodic, tasteful solos. I personally play in the Dorian mode. Good for solos. If you're playing metal though...you're beyond help. Learn the melodic scales and have fun.



wait what do you mean beyond help


cause my band is metal and metal solos are what I need to play
Best Guitarist Hands Down: Adrian Smith
#11
Here is the best I can put it m_esparza:METAL IS OVERRATED! Every teenager wants to play metal, every teenager wants to play fast, and so therefore they all sound the same. I haven't hear a unique piece of metal come out in YEARS. It is all so similar. I don't know why everyone is so concerned with metal and playing fast...fast is overrated too. Not everyone is Satriani...but they all want to be

EDIT:And I'm not CALLING you a teenager, I'm using that as an example, because there are TONS of teens that think metal is just sooo amazing...
Last edited by Soroki at Jul 18, 2009,
#12
Quote by Soroki
Here is the best I can put it m_esparza:METAL IS OVERRATED! Every teenager wants to play metal, every teenager wants to play fast, and so therefore they all sound the same. I haven't hear a unique piece of metal come out in YEARS. It is all so similar. I don't know why everyone is so concerned with metal and playing fast...fast is overrated too. Not everyone is Satriani...but they all want to be

EDIT:And I'm not CALLING you a teenager, I'm using that as an example, because there are TONS of teens that think metal is just sooo amazing...



but the thing is..

I DONT want to be super fast I just want my music to flow and to capture peoples musical attention.

Im more of a Maiden fan so I feel harmonizing is what music is about

Quality not Quantity as I always say

but I do not how to make the music flow thats why i posted this thread

And Im not trying to look down on you nor make fun of you

I mean i prob think your a good guitarist but Im just stating my views on guitar
Best Guitarist Hands Down: Adrian Smith
#13
Quote by Soroki
I have one piece of advice...fast doesn't mean much. You don't need to play fast to make good solos...focus on more melodic, tasteful solos. I personally play in the Dorian mode. Good for solos. If you're playing metal though...you're beyond help. Learn the melodic scales and have fun.


exactly, i love listening to slow blues, and of course it's played slow, but it's the passion and mastery of those scales that make it sound so great. Heavy Metal is the opposite, which is why i hate most of it... some isn't bad though
#14
Quote by Soroki
Use the A Dorian scales. If you look at my improv solo(Kangaroo Tears intro) in my profile(it sucks I know, the flat note was an accident lol) you can get a sort of an idea...I suck though lol.

EDITkay, i'll say I suck at improvising. I can't down my guitar playing completely when I actually compose something.

EDIT AGAIN:THIS AT ROCKZILLA



so like if its in C then play in D dorian
#15
^no, in practical terms D Dorian has nothing to do with C anything - if you want to play D Dorian then you need use the same notes as the C major scale but over backing that resolves to D, ideally something centred round a Dm7 chord.



there's been been very little useful information in this thread, a couple of gems but a lot of people just randomly suggesting stuff.

TS - this isn't about just about scales and there's no point learning random patterns and hoping for the best. You need to do the following things...

Learn the notes on the fretboard
Learn about intervals and the major scale - Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the Columns section will help
Learn about keys and how the major and minor scale are related.
Learn how to listen

You need to find out what key each song is in, that lets you know what scales you can use to solo in. Forget modes for the time being, they're not going to help yet and in all honesty you might never need them.

As far as actually soloing goes scales don't actually help all that much because they don't tell you HOW to play, they're just raw material. You need to listen to the song and create a melody from the scale....listen to what you're playing and how it fits with the backing and choose your notes accordingly by following the chords. How fast you can technically play doesn't factor into things yet, start slow and concentrate on getting something that sounds good.

You need to have an idea in your head of what you want things to sound like before you even start moving your fingers and picking strings - you should be controlling the guitar, not the other way round. Think of your melody first, then try to play it....if you just try and start playing it's more than likely going to sound like crap. The more you work on creating and playing what you've dreamed up the better you'll get at it, and as you progress you'll be able to do things that are more complex and also you'll be able to do it at a quicker speed.

Remember, you can only improvise as fast as you can think, if it takes you 20 seconds to think of the next note then you need to brush up on your theory, fretboard knowledge and listening skills so that you can actually do something useful with your technical abilities.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Jul 18, 2009,
#16
Quote by Soroki
Here is the best I can put it m_esparza:METAL IS OVERRATED! Every teenager wants to play metal, every teenager wants to play fast, and so therefore they all sound the same. I haven't hear a unique piece of metal come out in YEARS. It is all so similar. I don't know why everyone is so concerned with metal and playing fast...fast is overrated too. Not everyone is Satriani...but they all want to be

EDIT:And I'm not CALLING you a teenager, I'm using that as an example, because there are TONS of teens that think metal is just sooo amazing...


Yeah because between the buried and me sounds like metallica.

*facepalm*

Also unique metal comes out all the time, seriously metal is very diverse, much more than mainstream garbage.
#18
Quote by m_esparza09
Yo I'm a guitar player that has been playing for 2 years and now I have a band but the problem is that my drummer wants solos and I have fast enough hands and all but just don't know how to make the notes flow with scales.


What are some important scales to learn?


I will look them up and practice them hard.


Also, are arpeggios part of scales?


LOL @ "fast enough hands" Sorry, but that's hilarious.

Assuming your ready for it...

try learning some solos

- learn the scales used in the solos

You want to become familiar with the materials (scales in this case), and to experience them in context (a solo / melody).


If you want to understand the scales from a theoretical perspective (which will ultimately prove to be very helpful), start looking into theory. Start at the very beginning and work your way up from there. Be patient, it takes time.

If your like alot of people, you'll probably be able to play some solo's & scales before you truly understand them (theoretically). That's okay. Eventually, if you study theory, your knowledge will catch up to your playing ability, and each perspective will reinforce the other.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 19, 2009,
#19
Learn the major scale and the theory behind it.
Quote by UtBDan
this man hits the nail on the head.
#20
Quote by steven seagull
^no, in practical terms D Dorian has nothing to do with C anything - if you want to play D Dorian then you need use the same notes as the C major scale but over backing that resolves to D, ideally something centred round a Dm7 chord.



there's been been very little useful information in this thread, a couple of gems but a lot of people just randomly suggesting stuff.

TS - this isn't about just about scales and there's no point learning random patterns and hoping for the best. You need to do the following things...

Learn the notes on the fretboard
Learn about intervals and the major scale - Josh Urban's Crusade articles in the Columns section will help
Learn about keys and how the major and minor scale are related.
Learn how to listen

You need to find out what key each song is in, that lets you know what scales you can use to solo in. Forget modes for the time being, they're not going to help yet and in all honesty you might never need them.

As far as actually soloing goes scales don't actually help all that much because they don't tell you HOW to play, they're just raw material. You need to listen to the song and create a melody from the scale....listen to what you're playing and how it fits with the backing and choose your notes accordingly by following the chords. How fast you can technically play doesn't factor into things yet, start slow and concentrate on getting something that sounds good.

You need to have an idea in your head of what you want things to sound like before you even start moving your fingers and picking strings - you should be controlling the guitar, not the other way round. Think of your melody first, then try to play it....if you just try and start playing it's more than likely going to sound like crap. The more you work on creating and playing what you've dreamed up the better you'll get at it, and as you progress you'll be able to do things that are more complex and also you'll be able to do it at a quicker speed.

Remember, you can only improvise as fast as you can think, if it takes you 20 seconds to think of the next note then you need to brush up on your theory, fretboard knowledge and listening skills so that you can actually do something useful with your technical abilities.



How can you determine which scale goes with which chord?

is it something like C scale goes with C chord or something? (sorry if i made you laugh im new to scales >_>


Also how do you find what key a song is in
Best Guitarist Hands Down: Adrian Smith
#21
Quote by m_esparza09
How can you determine which scale goes with which chord?

is it something like C scale goes with C chord or something? (sorry if i made you laugh im new to scales >_>


Also how do you find what key a song is in

Any major or minor scale contains 7 notes, and using the notes of the scale you can derive a chord from each one using a method called "stacking thirds....you'll need to learn some more basic theory to understand that though. That will give you the chords that fit that key, and each of those 7 chords will be comprised solely of notes from within the associated major scale, so if your progression chords fit the key of C major then you'd want to use the C major scale over every chord - that's the easiest way to keep your solo's fluid and make sure thy fit with the rest of the music. It works because you're sticking to the same 7 notes, just rearranging them.

As a quick reference this site lists all the chords in the major and minor keys.

http://www.guitar-chords.org.uk/chords-key-c.html

It can be tricky to identify the key, that all comes with practice - often it's the first chord in the song but not always. In essence it's the chord the music is centred around, the one the rest of them seem to point towards, the one that feels like "home" when you hear it.

All this kind of stuff is intertwined, if you start reading through the Crusade articles it;ll gradually become more clear.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#22
Quote by steven seagull
Any major or minor scale contains 7 notes, and using the notes of the scale you can derive a chord from each one using a method called "stacking thirds....you'll need to learn some more basic theory to understand that though. That will give you the chords that fit that key, and each of those 7 chords will be comprised solely of notes from within the associated major scale, so if your progression chords fit the key of C major then you'd want to use the C major scale over every chord - that's the easiest way to keep your solo's fluid and make sure thy fit with the rest of the music. It works because you're sticking to the same 7 notes, just rearranging them.

As a quick reference this site lists all the chords in the major and minor keys.

http://www.guitar-chords.org.uk/chords-key-c.html

It can be tricky to identify the key, that all comes with practice - often it's the first chord in the song but not always. In essence it's the chord the music is centred around, the one the rest of them seem to point towards, the one that feels like "home" when you hear it.

All this kind of stuff is intertwined, if you start reading through the Crusade articles it;ll gradually become more clear.



Thanks man you really helped
Btw what are the crusade articles I'll be willing to look into them

I have SOME backgroud music theory information such as the notes on the fretboard and the intervals along with octaves and such. What should I start to learn in order to develop my music theory skills?

Thanks
Best Guitarist Hands Down: Adrian Smith
#23
i would first off learn the pentatonic minor scale. you can do some really cool things with those. then you can learn the natural minor scale and all that basically is is adding 2 notes to the pentatonic scales. they give more of a sad feel to the pentatonic especially from e to f and it adds a bit more color to the pentatonic. you can also learn the blues scale right then and there to cause its also one more note added to the pentatonic scale. just learn that for now and practice and try to make those scales kick ass. no point in really learning other scales if you cannot make those kick ass.
#24
Quote by m_esparza09
Thanks man you really helped
Btw what are the crusade articles I'll be willing to look into them

I have SOME backgroud music theory information such as the notes on the fretboard and the intervals along with octaves and such. What should I start to learn in order to develop my music theory skills?

Thanks

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?s=crusades&w=columns
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#26
Quote by Soroki
I haven't hear a unique piece of metal come out in YEARS.

umm what.

On the Virg, Cynic, Meshuggah, Scale the Summit, Opeth, Spastic Ink, Blotted Science, Animals as Leaders, Watchtower, Agalloch, Melechesh, Psyopus [though i dont like them, they are one of the most unique metal bands ever]

those are all pretty unique

i mean i would have to guess you are a big emotionz guy with prog rock, and thats cool i have every floyd album with the exceptions of lives and EPs.

also a big fan of genesis, king crimson, yes, rush, gentle giant, etc.

but theres plenty of unique metal, you just have to find it
My last.fm
Quote by OMMad
i've always found pop to be harder to play than metal... especially shred metal... it's just really fast tremolo picking and the occasional palm mute... and the only chords you have to worry about are power chords...