#1
Any1? What scales to learn, good solos to practice, etc.... btw I can alternate pick and economy pick pretty well, not ultra mega fast tho...

My main goal is to do the solo from Metallica - Whiplash

Thanks ^_^


Edit = Which are the scales? and how do I get the tabs ._. I know some of them, but i dont know the names. Thanks =D
Last edited by TheClown at Jul 18, 2009,
#2
Learn all of the scales. Befriend the metronome. Be one with your instrument. Good luck.
#3
play your own solos

and feel it. know what the notes you play are gonna sound like before you play it if that makes any sence to you
#4
Quote by consanguinei
play your own solos

and feel it. know what the notes you play are gonna sound like before you play it if that makes any sence to you

I've found this comes naturally and later on, so try not to stress out about this. Just experiment with the different scales on backing tracks and grow accustomed to them and soon you will know exactly what you want to play.
"My jedi powers are far more superior than yours"
#5
Quote by consanguinei
play your own solos

and feel it. know what the notes you play are gonna sound like before you play it if that makes any sence to you


your telling a beginner this?

hes not going to "feel" anything if he has no improv skills.

it takes a LONG time to develop a cognitive understanding of melody in relation to music understanding in relation to technical ability.

to the thread starter:

since you have a fascination about guitar solos, the only way to learn your metallica song is to actually look up the manuscript or tablature and do it. guitar takes discipline and work.

im happy for you that you are enthusiastic about learning guitar.
<3<3<3MILKSHAKE<3<3<3
#6
I can't do that.. I don't know how anything is going to sound before i play it. Any tips for that problem? Guidelines? I've been improvising loads of solo's over the last year and a half, which when i started playing solo's.. and i still have no clue on how it's going to sound if i play certain notes. I just do it.
FUCK YOU ALL!

666 BLACK METAL HOLOCAUST!!!!!
#7
stick to just the pentatonic nd improvise with that over a song that u know the key of and start from there
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Tell me what nation on this earth, was not born of tragedy-Primordial
#8
Learn all the notes on the neck and then learn all the major scales then learn how to change between keys with ease then learn the modes of the major scales. :] happy soloing
#9
Quote by Eggmond
stick to just the pentatonic nd improvise with that over a song that u know the key of and start from there
I like this post.

Learn a few pentatonic shapes (and the accompanying theory to know which pentatonic scale to use) and learn how to connect them together. After that, it's just a matter of playing seemingly random notes within this scale. Eventually, after many hours of fun (no sarcasm, seriously, improvising was the most fun before I was doing it properly), you'll realise what works and what doesn't.
I suggest beginners begin on pentatonics, as it's a fair bit easier to sound stable.

You may also want to learn to phrase. Have you ever noticed that a singer will only use 8 or so notes and then either hold that last note for a while or just stop singing? Those 8 notes constitute a phrase and using phrases is a very effective means of writing a melody (of any sort). I'd suggest you listen to a lot of slow, expressive melodic singers and copy their phrasing and rhythm whilst improvising. This is actually similar to how the blues was formed, as many blues guitarists wanted to play their gospel and work songs (which are slow and expressive) on their guitars. They were "singing" with their guitars.

So now you're using the right scales (you might have begun using major scales, which is fine for intermediate improvisers) and you're phrasing nicely, now it's time for your solo's to fit the chord progression. This is actually pretty simple, all you have to do is play a chord tone of the chord being used on all the strong sounding beats (this is usually the first beat of the bar and the beat that will have a pulse to it).
You can even take it one step further and make sure every non-chord tone is either approached or moves from in either one or two semitones. So say if G is a non chord tone, if you're using this method, you can only use an A, Ab, F, F# before or after this G note. This really isn't necessary, but it can help if you feel your solo's aren't fitting the chord progression well enough.
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#11
Quote by TheClown
Any1? What scales to learn, good solos to practice ...and how do I get the tabs


The answer is simple my friend; Scales - Try ''slanderous'' by Machine Head
Solo's - just listen to your favorite music and then look up some tabs. I would recommend some Trivium =]
Tabs - Well your on the best tab site in the world =]