#1
Hey guys , My guitar teacher asked me to research arpeggios abit for my lesson next week

What i know so far are that arpeggios are broken chords with one note played after another

So could anyone give me arpeggios in a nutshell and maybe an example to try?

Thanks alot UG!!
#3
Id prefer to have a discussion rather than a Wikipedia link to help me understand more
#5
Arpeggios are different from sweeps in the fact that you can let all the notes ring. So, play it like a chord and put maybe a half second between each note (you can make it longer or shorter, just saying)

Sweeps are much harder.
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#6
Quote by Guitar2theface
Arpeggios are different from sweeps in the fact that you can let all the notes ring. So, play it like a chord and put maybe a half second between each note (you can make it longer or shorter, just saying)

Sweeps are much harder.

You know they're called sweep arpeggios?
#7
Quote by Guitar2theface
Arpeggios are different from sweeps in the fact that you can let all the notes ring. So, play it like a chord and put maybe a half second between each note (you can make it longer or shorter, just saying)

Sweeps are much harder.


Sweep picking does provide shapes to play arpeggios however.
#9
e 12-8--------------------------8-12-----
B -------10------------------10---------
G -----------9-------------9-------------
D --------------10----10-----------------
A ------------------12------------------
E
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#10
Well off the top off my head an A minor arpeggio would be finding an A C and E and playing those notes one after the other.

Id just like to add that guitarists will often get confused and play the notes of a Barre chord one after the other and say thats an arpeggio, a Barre chord actually has the fifth after the note so instead of ACE an Am barre chord played in an arpeggio style would b A E A C E A which results in confusion.
#11
Quote by Thormier
Hey guys , My guitar teacher asked me to research arpeggios abit for my lesson next week

What i know so far are that arpeggios are broken chords with one note played after another

So could anyone give me arpeggios in a nutshell and maybe an example to try?

Thanks alot UG!!
An arpeggio is the notes of a chord played seperately. For example an A major triad
e|-------|
B|-------|
G|-------|
D|---2---|
A|---4---|
E|---5---|
An A major arpeggio
e|-------------|
B|-------------|
G|-------------|
D|---------2---|
A|------4------|
E|---5---------|
Open C major
e|---0---|
B|---1---|
G|---0---|
D|---2---|
A|---3---|
E|-------|
And arpeggiated
e|---------------0---------------|
B|------------1-----1------------|
G|---------0-----------0---------|
D|------2-----------------2------|
A|---3-----------------------3---|
E|-------------------------------|
.
#12
An arpeggio is just the notes of a chord played separately. It has little to do with sweep picking, which is a technique that may or may not be used to spell out an arpeggio. If you wrote a melody that used only the notes A, C, and E, for example, anywhere on the fretboard then you would be arpeggiating A minor, because A minor uses the A, C, and E also. It's that simple. You can find shapes for arpeggios, like say a "Major Arpeggio Shape." The shapes are very handy, but you should understand why they look the way they do. If you look up the Crusade Articles under the Columns section of this site then you should be on your way. They cover beginner's theory pretty well.

The use of arpeggios are pretty simple -- you use them in place of a chord. You could arpeggiate a chord progression, like in Dust in the Wind, by Kansas, for example, or you could use arpeggios in solos. In fact, some chord progression are so complicated to solo over that arpeggiating the underlying chord is the only way to go. This is also referred to as "using chord tones."

Edit: The Crusade Columns: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?s=crusade&w=columns
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Last edited by Eastwinn at Jul 18, 2009,