#1
I'm playing lead for my band and i can play solo's no doubt, and i can make my (i need some time though) but i'm not the best at improvising, i can do slow blues ok but i can't really do rock that well, any tips or techniques? Also i know penatonics, diatonics, harmonic (i think that's the name of it) scales, any other important ones to learn? Thanks in advance!
#2
In terms of actually playing, throw in the usual vibrato/bends/slides/hammer-on/pull-offs/muted strums and also multiple notes at a single time. Unison bends are cool, slide multiple notes at once.

I wouldn't really recommend studying scales and modes for the sake of "knowing" them, but how to apply them. Simply knowing the scales doesn't really help if you can't use them. Know the theory of how they are constructed, their intervals, and the chordal tones corresponding to the chords of that key. If you understand how they work and why the work, you can do what you want with them, and "break" the rules (but you have to know the rules before you break them, right?)

The mixolydian mode is a good one for rock, blues, and jazz. Throwing in a minor pentatonic riff can spice up the mixolydian. But go easy on the minor pentatonic for your own good. You can work yourself into a trap of playing the same scale in the same position, and hence the same ideas and no growth.

If you have a looper, loop a progression and play a corresponding mode. Just get the patterns in your fingers, and know them in every single position, and not just with the root on 6. Know the intervals you are playing. But as most people on here will tell you, practice. If you need really fantastic books on theory, I'd highly recommend the theory books by Don Latarski. They're very practical as theory books. But stay away from generic scale and chord books. As Ted Greene says; it's better to know a few chords and how to use them, then knowing tons of chords and not how to use them.

Good luck.
#3
The absolute best advice I can give you when improving ANYTHING is to get an idea going and EXPAND on it. Dont just jump around from idea to idea. When you write papers for a class you start each paragraph with a statement and than expand on that idea, correct? And in fact, the most interesting parts are not the individual statements, but what you do with them later on.

Same thing with improv. You start with this initial idea, or statement, and than you build on it.
#4
Quote by hunterman
In terms of actually playing, throw in the usual vibrato/bends/slides/hammer-on/pull-offs/muted strums and also multiple notes at a single time. Unison bends are cool, slide multiple notes at once.

I wouldn't really recommend studying scales and modes for the sake of "knowing" them, but how to apply them. Simply knowing the scales doesn't really help if you can't use them. Know the theory of how they are constructed, their intervals, and the chordal tones corresponding to the chords of that key. If you understand how they work and why the work, you can do what you want with them, and "break" the rules (but you have to know the rules before you break them, right?)

The mixolydian mode is a good one for rock, blues, and jazz. Throwing in a minor pentatonic riff can spice up the mixolydian. But go easy on the minor pentatonic for your own good. You can work yourself into a trap of playing the same scale in the same position, and hence the same ideas and no growth.

If you have a looper, loop a progression and play a corresponding mode. Just get the patterns in your fingers, and know them in every single position, and not just with the root on 6. Know the intervals you are playing. But as most people on here will tell you, practice. If you need really fantastic books on theory, I'd highly recommend the theory books by Don Latarski. They're very practical as theory books. But stay away from generic scale and chord books. As Ted Greene says; it's better to know a few chords and how to use them, then knowing tons of chords and not how to use them.

Good luck.


Thanks for the advice, and i wish i had a looper, but i created 2 backing tracks, on in Am and the other in E major (i play bass, drums, etc btw) so i've been practicing to those) and i'll try most of that, thx