#1
I was at a school talent show a few months ago. There were many different bands that played, but two stuck out. Both played very similar music, but both of their stage presence was very different. The first band had more musical talent, but they didn't move much. The band that went right after them moved a lot and jumped around, but their music suffered because of it. Anywhoo, the crowd seemed to like the guys that jumped around over the other guys who were stiff (but sounded way better).

So... my rhythm guitarist (who is a good friend of mine) is just an okay player. I'm sure he can jump around and stuff without losing sound quality. Should I tell him to move around more in hopes of making him seem like a better player until he actually improves?
#3
Stage presence is key in any live performance.

you can do it by interacting with the crowd, joking, things like that. you can do it mid-song.

Watch some live vids of Buckethead. He has certain parts of his sets designated for crowd interaction, and he doesn't even talk, yet people love it.

Consider this; You say band A was much better sounding than band B. you're looking at this from a musician's standpoint, which is much different (and much more critical in most cases) than the 'average person's'.
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thought I was dreaming
of you...


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#5
they way i've always kind of looked at performing shows is people can listen good music anytime they want to, but when they go to a concert, they wanna hear good music AND see a performance

that doesnt mean you have to jump around all over though, some bands use other methods of engaging the crowd just like Td_Nights said
#6
Quote by Levi79
I think stage presence is important but cut it down when it starts to affect the actual music


That's the thing. I know my guitarist can move around without losing any sound quality. When I play, I'm usually kind of stiff, but I always get compliments for my playing. I'm thinking of moving around a lot more next time in order to make things more interesting, but I know that my playing will be affected. Nothing too bad, but some may notice. I'm not sure if I should sacrifice good playing for good presence.
Last edited by sticksause at Jul 19, 2009,
#7
When recording - the musical talent is more important.
When performing - it's all about the stage presence.

IMO When performing live having good stage presence and a tight rythm matters (to the crowd) the most.
***Short Sig***
#8
To play with good stage presence, you need to be able to play the songs you are doing with relative ease

So, if you are playing a song live that is the height of your musical abilities, you can't afford to move around, but if you're playing an easier song you can without the quality of the music suffeirng.

Its kinda like overdrive / headroom on an amp
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#10
Its weird. I was in a recent talent show, and we didnt have excessive amounts of stage presence. When I was soloing, i sort of moved around, and looked around at the rest of the band. When I wasnt playing, i held the mic stand, etc.
So we didnt have a great deal of stage presence, and the music wasnt too shabby. But at one point in the song, I just started clapping, and got the audience clapping along. The audience loved it. The trick is to get the audience on your side, as well as entertain them, or at least thats what I found out.
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#11
yes stage presence does improve a performance and by an awful lot
yet as people have said you don't want your sound quality to suffer
definately make your rhythm guitarist move around abit
and even if you just stand still don't stand completely stiff move your body and guitar fittingly
best way to get a good stage performance is to practice it at band practice
sounds obvious but it means you practice stuff whilst doing the songs finding where your limit is of how much you can move and play also it means you can get second opinion of whether what your doing looks good
#12
I've always thought of it that you play a show...that's what it is a show...You're there to entertain. Generally your bog standard bar/club crowd don't care that you've just done a searing 3 octave lead line just using your foreskin.... they want to be entertained... so yes...stage presence matters.

IMO
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#13
On this topic, see The Dillinger Escape Plan.

They pull off their songs perfectly, but if you've seen live vids... well, you know what they are like
#14
Makes sense in real concerts because the crowd came to see you put up a great performance.

But what about a school talent show where you came to play for the crowd. Can moving around make you look like an idiot?
#15
Quote by kocodeluxe
Makes sense in real concerts because the crowd came to see you put up a great performance.

But what about a school talent show where you came to play for the crowd. Can moving around make you look like an idiot?


Yes it can.

Now, if it's something that you do naturally..... something your good at...... not something you force yourself to do because you think it's "important"...... it might make you look cool.

Be true to yourself.


Quote by sticksause
I was at a school talent show a few months ago. There were many different bands that played, but two stuck out. Both played very similar music, but both of their stage presence was very different. The first band had more musical talent, but they didn't move much. The band that went right after them moved a lot and jumped around, but their music suffered because of it. Anywhoo, the crowd seemed to like the guys that jumped around over the other guys who were stiff (but sounded way better).

So... my rhythm guitarist (who is a good friend of mine) is just an okay player. I'm sure he can jump around and stuff without losing sound quality. Should I tell him to move around more in hopes of making him seem like a better player until he actually improves?


The thing you have to ask yourself is ..... "do I want to be known for jumping around, or for my music" ?

I'm not saying one is better than the other. As you witnessed, alot of people are more into the spectacle then the actual music.

What's important to you? Follow your own instincts.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 21, 2009,
#16
The key is finding the balance between being accurate and being energetic.

No one will mind a few bum notes if you're getting everyone totally into it, but if you just flail wildly ad nothing comes of it musically well then people will be less than impressed. The same comes from just standing there, you might be playing like Yngwie on fire but people wont care if you're just standing there.

Then again, you don't need to be jumping around all the time to create a fun energetic presence. There are subtler ways of showing you're enjoying yourself .
Last edited by rizo299 at Jul 21, 2009,
#17
Quote by Skuzzmo
I've always thought of it that you play a show...that's what it is a show...You're there to entertain. Generally your bog standard bar/club crowd don't care that you've just done a searing 3 octave lead line just using your foreskin.... they want to be entertained... so yes...stage presence matters.

IMO

I'm pretty sure that would entertain people.
#18
Just like everyone else has said, its all about finding the balance between your musical ability and your stage presence.
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#19
I find that if you really enjoy the music you are playing, you will end up moving around by yourself...when ever I do blues licks and solos and whatnot, I always end up making faces and moving my shoulders alot like if i was doing hard work...its alot more entertaining than standing there looking at your guitar