#1
So i've been playing guitar for just a few days off a year, and i've decided to take theory classes in september for a couple of years through college.

I'm self taught, i made a point of not getting a guitar teacher because i knew that i would play what they wanted me to, and i would get bored and quit, but as a result of this, i know virtually no theory...

This is probably gonna sound like a stupid question, but i don't know the answer, and the chances are one of you do, so i'm gonna ask it, is there such thing as like, "Guitar Theory" as opposed to general music theory, as in, will the general music theory classes im taking next year help me learn things such as scales, modes, and that sort of thing, to help me progress in my guitar playing, or will it just help general musicianship?

thanks in advance,
Aaron
Last edited by Ampx612 at Jul 19, 2009,
#2
first off, if you really want to be a good player, get a teacher. but make sure you find a teacher that plays what you play. like i had a metal player for a teacher when i wanted to play the blues and jazz, doesn't work. second, general theory will teach you every thing you need to know for any instrument. modes are the same one saxophone as compared to piano compared to guitar.
#5
Good question.
I've never taken lessons myself, but was in high school band for about 6 years (alto sax lol).
I barely learned any music theory in band class, so I went online and learned everything I needed to know pretty much.

What I found was that there isn't really "guitar theory," but there is. Taking what you learn in music theory and putting it on guitar, to me, would be like guitar theory. Most of the things you learn in theory (sequences, scales, progressions, etc.) will end up shaping up on the fretboard as patterns. Learning all those patterns is what I would consider guitar theory. Think of it like creating software for a Mac and then having to make that same software PC compatible; both versions are essentially the same but very different.

I hope this helped, but I found it very hard to try to type out what I actually wanted to say lol.
#6
Quote by Ampx612
So i've been playing guitar for just a few days off a year, and i've decided to take theory classes in september for a couple of years through college.

I'm self taught, i made a point of not getting a guitar teacher because i knew that i would play what they wanted me to, and i would get bored and quit, but as a result of this, i know virtually no theory...

This is probably gonna sound like a stupid question, but i don't know the answer, and the chances are one of you do, so i'm gonna ask it, is there such thing as like, "Guitar Theory" as opposed to general music theory, as in, will the general music theory classes im taking next year help me learn things such as scales, modes, and that sort of thing, to help me progress in my guitar playing, or will it just help general musicianship?

thanks in advance,
Aaron


^ with that kind of attitude, why bother taking any classes? You won't succeed.

and to answer your questions.

no, there is no "guitar theory" that you could take to avoid "music theory".

Will the class help you? maybe, but you would have to have a better attitude, and be prepared. You might want to reconsider your view on talking lessons BEFORE you take a theory class. It's all the same ya know..... they teach ya stuff..... you have to be open to that concept 1st.
shred is gaudy music
#7
Quote by GuitarMunky
^ with that kind of attitude, why bother taking any classes? You won't succeed.

and to answer your questions.

no, there is no "guitar theory" that you could take to avoid "music theory".

Will the class help you? maybe, but you would have to have a better attitude, and be prepared. You might want to reconsider your view on talking lessons BEFORE you take a theory class. It's all the same ya know..... they teach ya stuff..... you have to be open to that concept 1st.


I wasn't trying to have a bad attitude.. What i meant was that i've had lessons for various different things in the past, and the teacher has always wanted me to do it their way, what I meant was that now i've been playing for a year, and i've gotten a feel for it, now might be a better time for lessons.. Sorry if i offended you in some way :S

...I also wasn't trying to avoid music theory.. If i was, i wouldn't be taking the lessons in the first place
Last edited by Ampx612 at Jul 19, 2009,
#8
Quote by Ampx612
I wasn't trying to have a bad attitude.. What i meant was that i've had lessons for various different things in the past, and the teacher has always wanted me to do it their way, what I meant was that now i've been playing for a year, and i've gotten a feel for it, now might be a better time for lessons.. Sorry if i offended you in some way :S

...I also wasn't trying to avoid music theory.. If i was, i wouldn't be taking the lessons in the first place


Na, it's okay, you didn't offend me, I'm just saying that if you can't put your trust in a teacher, how are you going to learn anything? The idea is to learn "their way".... that's why you're going to them in the 1st place. Your asking for direction from someone that's more experienced than you.

btw, if you really want to get into music theory, and understand it on a deep level, I highly recommend that you study with a teacher 1st and learn to read standard notation.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 19, 2009,
#9
Visit a few teachers. You'll find that a lot of them understand that you want to take what they know (ie, a lot of useful stuff) and apply it to your own particular way of playing.

Second of all, you make music. Hence music theory is useful.

That being said, there are some things that are kind-of guitar theory - eg, how to find your way around the fingerboard. I have lessons on my youtube that will help you with that, as if you don't know the basics you'll be in trouble in a class.
#11
I don't think a teacher is vital. I never had a teacher, and I'm a better player than a lot of guys I know who have had teachers and have been playing longer (their words, not mine).

As for guitar theory, there are some lessons, books, and videos about that stuff, but its really just a tweaked version of Music Theory, which is the only class of that sort you'll find in college. Some classes (I think Belmont does it) splits classes into like, composition, and then ear training/sight singing, or something like that. But Music Theory is a great class for any musician, IMO.

I entered Music Theory my first semester of college. I'm heading into my junior year as a double major with two minors as well, and I can honestly say that I learned more in Theory class than I did in any other class. It helped me immensly as a guitarist, a songwriter, and in my opinion it turned me from "a guy who can play guitar" to a true musician

The only thing is, it takes some time to realize how to apply what you learn in Theory to your instrument of choice. I was mainly into shred and such when I entered theory. At first I was like "Wtf is this guy teaching me?" But now its sunk in and its just another tool in my musical toolbox. And I'm still into shred, and I feel I can do it better now. It also opened my eyes for other genres, which was great.