#1
The notes i have been show say
C#D#E#F#G#A#B#

How is that possible given that there is no E# don't they mean Eb? Being that it's enharmonic and all

i'm having a stupid moment :<
Last edited by Novalydian at Jul 19, 2009,
#2
Eb is not harmonic to E#. There is an E# and B# because there can only be one of every letter in a scale, so for instance you can't go D# F F#, you need an E# which is enharmonic to the F.
#3
Quote by Novalydian
The notes i have been show say
C#D#E#F#G#A#B#

How is that possible given that there is no E# don't they mean Eb? Being that it's enharmonic and all

i'm having a stupid moment :<
There is an E#. It's enharmonic to F. Eb wouldn't make sense because it's enharmonic to D#. And I tend would call it Db major not C# major so the notes would be Db, Eb, F, Gb, Ab, Bb and C which is a lot easier to read.
.
#4
E# is 1/2 step up from E, that is what # means, 1/2 step up.

b means 1/2 step down

Its enharmonic to an F note
My last.fm
Quote by OMMad
i've always found pop to be harder to play than metal... especially shred metal... it's just really fast tremolo picking and the occasional palm mute... and the only chords you have to worry about are power chords...
#5
Quote by Novalydian
The notes i have been show say
C#D#E#F#G#A#B#

How is that possible given that there is no E# don't they mean Eb? Being that it's enharmonic and all

i'm having a stupid moment :<


C sharp major does exist but it should also be noted that D flat major is more common:

Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C

E# is also seen in F# major, and Cb is seen in Gb major.
#6
C# has all sharped notes and Cb has all flatted notes.

C has none.
Parker PDF30
Vox VT40+
#7
Db is enharmonic to C# and is more commonly used (5b's against 7#s) however c# is occasionally used as a scale as it has a technically (though not really practical) basis.

If you were to go 1/2 step up from C you arrive at C# not Db. If you went 1/2 a step down from D you would end up at Db not C#. Though they are the same note they should be notated different as they are implying a different motion from the previous key (NB if there is no previous key that it is moving from then the default is to use the key with the least sharps/flats)

As a side you could also have a G#major scale with 8#'s which creates a double sharp F
G# A# B# C# D# E# F##
Although enharmonic to the much simpler Ab scale this does have occasional use and i've even seen it once - years ago though and I can't remember where (maybe rachmaninoff?)
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#8
If you're having trouble with a scale like that, use this formula.

Starting with your tonic pitch (a C in this case) write out an octaves worth of pitches.

C-D-E-F-G-A-B-C

Those notes will be in your scale, but they may be affected by accidentals to conform to the step pattern. Since the starting note is a C#, we can go ahead and change that.

C#-D-E-F-G-A-B-C

Now the major scale step pattern is W-W-H-W-W-W-H. All we have to do is stay true to that while using accidentals to conform our octaves worth of pitches to the step pattern.

A whole step up from C# would be D#.

A whole step from D#. We know its going to be some kind of E, because thats our next pitch in this octaves worth of pitches. A half step from D# would be E. So raising it a whole step would give us E#.

Just keep that pattern going.
#9
Quote by Novalydian
given that there is no E#

Correction, E# and B# exist. A major scale is a diatonic scale which means it NEEDS to have 7 different letters. So you can't just say C, C# because you're repeating the C. It needs to B#, C#.
#10
Quote by doive


As a side you could also have a G#major scale with 8#'s which creates a double sharp F
G# A# B# C# D# E# F##
Although enharmonic to the much simpler Ab scale this does have occasional use and i've even seen it once - years ago though and I can't remember where (maybe rachmaninoff?)


I guess that might be used if a piece was in G#m and it modulated to tonic major. I have seen some Rach pieces listed as in G# but it's usually a typo.
American Deluxe maple board Strat
Hot Rod Deluxe
Fulltone Fulldrive II mosfet