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#1
Hey

So our bands got a first gig on tuesday, we only hired a vocalist last week but he's just not being showing up to practices and he's hard to get in contact with...so unless he suddenly materialises between now and tuesday we have two choices:

1) cancel the gig, though we've already told the venue / mates to come
2) I (rhythm guitarist) can step in and sing

We're doing a three song set of Enter Sandman, Smells Like Teen Spirit and Land of Confusion.

So to me there's two problems here - firstly, learning to play guitar whilst singing. But, I'm pretty confident I can learn it in the time - I can play much harder songs than these technically so have quite a bit of headroom whilst playing them to sing as well, and if I do trip up on anything, I can just stop playing for a bit, and let the lead guitarist (who will be playing the rhythm parts unless he's in a solo) do it whilst I sing.


However, the main problem is...can I sing?

Vocally, I've never really tried apart from in the car / as a laugh or whatever. I'm no Bruce Dickinson, but I can sing in key and hold a note. I have never sung in front of an actual audience.

So just wanted to get a few opinions, is singing really 80% the confidence to sing in front of people, and 20% your actual vocal ability? So, can pretty much anyone, with the right amount of confidence, pull off at least a 'passable' singing voice?

Or should we cancel the gig :P

Cheers
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#2
Try at, if your at a gig, most people look for the atmosphere of the concert, Like, if you guys have your **** together, and don't look too nervous, you should do fine.
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#4
Quote by PuppetMaster91
So, can pretty much anyone, with the right amount of confidence, pull off at least a 'passable' singing voice?

no, their are people with horrible voices who should never be allowed to sing

but most people with enough confidence and practice can sing decently as long as they know the limits of their vocal range
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#5
You'l probably do alright if you practice a lot, remember your probably not going to be playing in front of many people.
#6
If you guys put up the real show, and your voice can blend into the songs, go for it...

Record yourself, get others judgement, the bands judgement, your own judgement...

Or that would at least help
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#7
cheers for all the replies

I'll probably give it a shot - I mean, hopefully we'll sort something out with this proper vocalist, but I'll learn how to play in time with singing anyway...if its any use we're playing easy songs vocally (genesis, nirvana, metallica), so nothings out of my actual range...

i dno - I hate hearing my own speaking voice on tape...but then I think everyone gets that - I'll give it a shot, get back to you guys on how it goes lol!

If anyone has any tips on how to play and sing at the same time it'd be appreciated...most parts I'm okay with but sometimes when the notes for vocals and guitar don't line up it gets a bit...headf*cky
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#8
Watch an episode of American Idol. You know all those bad singers who are baffled when they're told how terrible they are? Well, they've got boat loads of confidence.
Now, draw your own conclusions.
As for singing and playing at the same time: you have 2 days to do this. I'm telling you from experience, it isn't going to happen, especially if you're an inexperienced singer. Do NOT attempt this. It's one thing to know the guitar part perfectly and the vocal part perfectly (as you are not a singer, this is already a big challenge, hitting each note properly is difficult enough). It is another thing entirely to do both at the same time.
#9
I would say it's the other way around, 80% ability, 20% confidence. The voice is like any other instrument out there - some people are naturally gifted, while others have to work really hard to master it. If you've never played and sang at the same time, in all honesty, I wouldn't do the gig. It is a lot harder than it seems (at least it was for me). No one (other than the owner of the venue) is going to be upset with you if you decide to cancel seeing as your singer is unreliable. Honestly though, if all you're doing is covering 3 over-played, tired-out songs, the venue owner probably won't care too much if you cancel, as he likely doesn't have very high expectations to begin with.

My advice - find a reliable vocalist who is able to take on the roll of frontman. Once you've established a solid lineup, then work on writing some originals to throw in with a few covers (if you're wanting to still play covers). Also, I wouldn't attempt to play the covers as carbon-copies of the originals. The problem with most cover bands (that I've seen anyways) is that they play really popular "hit" songs and try to cover them exactly how they were recorded. If I wanted to hear the song exactly like how it was written, I'd go home and listen to the CD. Instead, you should pick some "B-Side" songs and change them (while still keeping them recognizable) to fit your band's style. This way, you're still playing songs that most people will recall without sounding like a top 40 radio station from the 90's while still keeping peoples' attention by altering the songs to fit your band's style.
#10
It would realy suck to cancel the gig, so I think you should attempt to sing and play, but on any of the harder singing parts just let the lead guitarist play. Once Iron Maiden had to have Steve sing at a gig and he sounds like Homer Simpson
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#11
This is a classic case of booking a gig when you're not prepared. Hiring a vocalist? Are you paying him and he's not showing up? Weird.

Oh, you could attempt to sing it, but it's not going to be pretty.
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#12
I know a guy who constantly messed up singing on stage but was extremely confident in his abilities and always talking to the crowd. People would always comment about his mistakes but still went to see the band play because he was a bit of an entertainer on stage.
Anyway, not too long ago, the band themselves told him he wasn't too great and it knocked him back a bit. He lost a load of confidence in his ability and started making even more mistakes, making up lyrics on the spot because he couldn't be bothered learning the right ones and in the end, no one bothered going to see them.

My point being confidence counts for a lot but if you're rubbish to begin with, people will still notice
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#13
Hey cheers again for all the replies - both the positive and negative ones, seriously

Just to clarify the situation, we found a guy to sing just over a week ago, we're not paying him but he's just hard to get a hold of and I doubt we're going to be able to practice with him in time.

@CDubDSP - what you outlined is, pretty much what we are looking to do but as more of a long-term thing. What we're looking for really is just having a few jams / gigs over summer, because after that we all go away to different unis anyway.

The pub we're playing in is really struggling to stay afloat - they were really desperate for someone to play just to pull a crowd in.

I still want to go ahead with it - if we were playing say...Iron Maiden or something I wouldn't do it because the vocals are just too complex but with our setlist:

Enter Sandman - very guitar heavy song, quite easy to sing and play at the same time, and if I get a bit confused, I can just stop playing and concentrate on the singing for a bit, as our lead will be playing it anyway

Land of Confusion - insanely easy - there is no guitar at the same time as the vocals so...

Teen Spirit - probably the harder one, but again lead and rhythm play the same parts, so I can just drop it if I need to

@ koslack - I really hadn't considered that before! F'n good point lol! I have thought about it and...i think theres a big difference ni that on american idol and stuff, theyre playing much harder stuff vocally and doing a solo performance.
I'll be playing pretty instrument-heavy songs, which my voice will blend into, and the vocals aren't anywhere near as hard as mariah carey or michael jackson or something like that.


So yeah bottom line, I'm going to do it - I'll just, turn my PA down a little so the voice isnt as far above the instruments as usual, few jokes / chats to audience / audience singing on key parts...at worst it'll be decent i think!
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#14
I['ve always said exactly that; singing is 20% ability and 80% balls...

However, by that I mean the confidence to start singing is the hardest part, to not be afraid of sounding crap. That's the biggest hurdle, but after that you've still got to work on your ability for a long time to be particularly good.

I say go for it - it's only three songs and none of them are particularly vocal-centric. I suggest you stick on Planet rock, or a wide mix of rock albums, and sing along to everything you can, constantly.
While you're on the computer posting on UG or whatever it is you do, you should be singing along to background music. That should give you more than enough practice to pull off a few songs in a pub to a listenable standard.
#15
Cancel the gig. Actually.... you shouldn't have taken the gig in the first place. I mean, you hired a singer a week before a gig? C'mon! And now he's flaking out and you want to sing and play guitar at the same time, when you've never even sang before? C'mon.

You are totally not ready. Now, if the audience is going to ONLY be a bunch of your friends and everyone is doing it for sh!ts and giggles, then that's one thing, but what about the people who will be in the audience who have chosen - among all the other thousands of options - to come out and see your band? Christ. You're not up there for YOU. You're up there for THEM. Show some respect and graciously bow out.

If you really want to be a class act, find another band who will be willing to do it who is more prepared and suggest them to the venue operator.

CT

PS. To address the specific question....

Singing is a LOT to do with confidence. If you think you can't, then you can't. Pretty much guaranteed. If you think you MIGHT, then maybe you can.

I started off as a terrible, terrible, terrible singer. It took me ten years of lessons to start calling myself a singer, but even the road to actually having the balls to pick up the phone and call a teacher requires a certain amount of belief in yourself that maybe you can actually do it with some help.

However, even with a small amount of confidence, I was still a terrible singer.

Just like guitar, confidence feeds ability, and ability feeds confidence. It's a circle. Once you're on the upswing, you're fine. I would really hesitate to suggest any sort of magic ratio.
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Last edited by axemanchris at Jul 20, 2009,
#16
@kyle62 - thats pretty encouraging

I sing along to stuff quite often...does the following make sense to you though...obviously because I'm at home and its otherwise quiet...I never want to sing above a certain volume...but I don't feel like I'm getting the most, tonally, out of my voice by doing so?

Maybe in the same way that...if you play through a cranked tube amp, it sounds not just louder, but tonally 'better' than the same amp on a quiet setting?

But, if I had instruments backing, and voice had to be amplified etc...I could set the PA to a level where I had to sing at my 'cranked' volume to be heard?
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Last edited by PuppetMaster91 at Jul 20, 2009,
#17
Quote by axemanchris
Cancel the gig. Actually.... you shouldn't have taken the gig in the first place. I mean, you hired a singer a week before a gig? C'mon! And now he's flaking out and you want to sing and play guitar at the same time, when you've never even sang before? C'mon.

You are totally not ready. Now, if the audience is going to ONLY be a bunch of your friends and everyone is doing it for sh!ts and giggles, then that's one thing, but what about the people who will be in the audience who have chosen - among all the other thousands of options - to come out and see your band? Christ. You're not up there for YOU. You're up there for THEM. Show some respect and graciously bow out.

If you really want to be a class act, find another band who will be willing to do it who is more prepared and suggest them to the venue operator.

CT


I am thinking about all this kinda stuff but - it quite literally is just mates and people we've invited thats going to be there, and the pub just runs an open mic night on that night, but they havent had people going in the last few weeks so they asked us to perform a few songs when we were just in there jamming.

So its not a specially organised thing....but I do take your point about it being short notice / too soon etc.
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#18
Mics don't lie. If you sound wussy and thin in front of the mic, you will sound wussy and thin out front, just really loud and wussy and thin.

If you project and sing with resonance in front of the mic, then that's what the audience will hear, so long as the sound person has his/her levels in order.

A mic and a PA will not make you sound better. Just louder.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#19
Open mic... okay then. I'd hesitate to call that a gig. At open mics, people are generally really tolerant of buffoons who are unprepared. That's kind of the point... just get up and have fun, and if it all crashes down, well... so be it. Everyone has a good laugh about it and moves on.

Kinda like Karaoke night, only everyone plays their own instruments. Nobody really cares if you suck, because that's half the fun, and the next person/group up might well be pretty good. And if they're not, then it's going to be their turn soon enough.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#20
Cheers again for the reply

What I meant in my previous post was...when I'm at home there's almost always someone else in, parents / sister or whatever so I'm not going to be singing 'say your prayers, little one' at the top of my lungs

but with lots of background noise, and with the PA you have the freedom to sing at any level you want (i.e. a volume where your voice is 'cranked'...if it makes sense using it in that context), and then turn the PA up to whatever level makes you reasonably audible to the crowd

And its kinda in between an open mic and a gig - the night is run weekly as an open mic...but like I say for the past few weeks no-ones been going so the manager asked us to prepare some stuff and go down...we'll in all probability be the only act playing

So...yeah the audience will be expecting a performance kinda...better rehearsed than a typical open mic but will be more forgiving than a typical gig audience if that makes sense

:S
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#21
Every singer has to start somewhere, if you give up because you don't naturally have a good singing voice from the get go, you'll never have any chance to develop it. I think most people have the ability to sing if they have confidence and put the effort into it.

Plus its an open mic night, and you're saying majority of the crowd will be mates. Unless you feel it will be a complete disaster, you should go through with it. It basically comes down to the saying of "the show must go on".
Last edited by take_it_t at Jul 20, 2009,
#22
Oy vay zmeer.
I think the point where you lost me was when you said 'Land of Confusion' isn't a hard song. An inexperienced singer simply cannot project while maintaining the nuances. You're going to tell me that a Phil Collins song is easy to sing? Please.

This is what it boils down to: if you don't mind screwing up a thousand times and sounding horrible in front of people, do it. If that kind of embarrassment isn't your cup of tea, cancel it.
#23
I'm not saying its going to be great or even 'good' - if I can get away with 'passable' vocals, I'll be happy!

Literally, I'm looking to find ways to keep this thing going now that we've all put so much into it, and I don't think land of confusion is that hard? From a guitar playing point of view, I said it was very easy because at no point is the guitar playing at the same time as the vocals, so that makes my job easier to begin with.

Phil Collins is an incredible singer, but this song isn't really one that demonstrates his vocal ability - no doubt phil can do it 100x better than me, but I think I could pull this one off whereas with some of his other (particularly solo) stuff, like You'll be in my heart, there's just notes / vibrato I can't pull off!!

I've had a range of feedback from this thread, and I've taken it all into consideration so thanks to everyone, but I'm going to go for it - I'll have the sound guy set it so I'm not standing out too much, and just sing as good as I can...at worst it'll be decent as the songs aren't particularly vocal-centric, as I think someone else pointed out

I'll let yas know how it goes
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#24
I agree totally with you... just play the gig. If you cancel your letting the pub down and they will probably not want to hear from you again
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#25
Man I'm having an issue like this... I write music, but I just can't see somebody else singing it for me. I mean, its my emotions, I don't want to have somebody else express them besides me, but I've never really thought I could sing. My friends have only heard me singing when I'm trying to imitate some other voice, in a purposely crappy way. My girlfriend has heard my voice, and she says she likes it (but thats my girlfriend, she's not gonna tell me that I suck ass). But I have a lot of confidence that If I can just hit the right pitches, and if I stay inside my vocal range I'll be all-right! So yeah man, you should gig!
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#26
Just figured I'd update you guys on how it went

It wasn't without its **** ups, but it was awesome! Do not regret it for a second.
We got there, and to be fair the mic wasn't working, so few people could hear me, but I got to sing at my 'full volume potential' or whatever its called, and to me it sounded good, and the people on the front said it was good - fair enough they were my mates, but I'd been warning them about my singing all week and they seemed surprised at it.

We played four songs - Teen Spirit, Enter Sandman, Hallowed be Thy Name and Land of Confusion...because we were playing without a drummer / bassist we used a backing track on guitar pro which led to some technical difficulties (closed half way through a song, for example) and I had to use a borrowed amp which gave me a feedback attach half wasy through our last song.

But we had a mate on stage helping us out with stuff and resolved them quickly, everyone seemed to like it - I listened to recordings taken from the middle of the room and was pleasantly surprised about how good it sounded.

The manager loved it and offered us a regular weekly spot there and at another place on a different day, and said he'd sort a mic / PA out!

It was great! I'm really tempted to get into singing properly now though...i recorded myself in the morning today and it was dire...as I expected it to be...but after reading some stuff oline about technique, by the end of the day I was impressed with it and really built my confidence up...

So the gig was not perfect, but well worth doing!

and @5150rando - I know how you feel...give singing a try through online resources, if you think you can sound decent look into a tutor maybe? If you're a good lyricist and have songs 'in you' you want to get out...don't put it off to someone else to screw up unless you have to!
And
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#27
Quote by PuppetMaster91
Just figured I'd update you guys on how it went

It wasn't without its **** ups, but it was awesome! Do not regret it for a second.
We got there, and to be fair the mic wasn't working, so few people could hear me, but I got to sing at my 'full volume potential' or whatever its called, and to me it sounded good, and the people on the front said it was good - fair enough they were my mates, but I'd been warning them about my singing all week and they seemed surprised at it.

We played four songs - Teen Spirit, Enter Sandman, Hallowed be Thy Name and Land of Confusion...because we were playing without a drummer / bassist we used a backing track on guitar pro which led to some technical difficulties (closed half way through a song, for example) and I had to use a borrowed amp which gave me a feedback attach half wasy through our last song.

But we had a mate on stage helping us out with stuff and resolved them quickly, everyone seemed to like it - I listened to recordings taken from the middle of the room and was pleasantly surprised about how good it sounded.

The manager loved it and offered us a regular weekly spot there and at another place on a different day, and said he'd sort a mic / PA out!

It was great! I'm really tempted to get into singing properly now though...i recorded myself in the morning today and it was dire...as I expected it to be...but after reading some stuff oline about technique, by the end of the day I was impressed with it and really built my confidence up...

So the gig was not perfect, but well worth doing!

and @5150rando - I know how you feel...give singing a try through online resources, if you think you can sound decent look into a tutor maybe? If you're a good lyricist and have songs 'in you' you want to get out...don't put it off to someone else to screw up unless you have to!
And


Congrats!

Singing doesn't have to be this hard, impossible thing everybody makes it out to be. It should be a fun, relaxing thing, that everyone can learn, and get good at. I'm glad you seem to understand this.

I hope you enjoy doing it, and Good Luck! (with singing and future gigs)
#28
Wow performing without a mic! That truly is down in the mix.

In the interests of adding something constructive to this thread, I just want to say that the OP is still in for a shock when he performs with a mic. The only thing that this performance showed was that they can perform an instrumental version of their set because nobody could hear him.

Your voice is meant to be in the front of the mix, the other instruments support your voice, not the other way around. Most people will want to hear the vocals, and they want it up loud. So should you if you're a singer.

You can't sing softly and then raise the volume to be loud either. The mic will not add power to your voice, just volume. If you're singing those rock songs you want to have power in your voice, not some wimpy dude whimpering into the mic. The reason you'd prefer to do this is because you are hesitant about performing in front of an audience - you can't even practice at home!

It's admirable that you want to sing, and you should go ahead and learn. Singing lessons are a great thing to get though, and also tape yourself singing and listen to it. You don't want the first time you hear your voice to be on stage through a fold back.
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Last edited by AlanHB at Jul 22, 2009,
#29
+1

Ct
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#30
i've heard from some people that being nervous can make you sing better. i've never experienced this. i say if you can't really get in touch with the singer and you're not completely confident singing, you may want to cancel the gig. but that's just my overly cautious, non-singing 2 cents...
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#31
Quote by AlanHB
In the interests of adding something constructive to this thread, I just want to say that the OP is still in for a shock when he performs with a mic. The only thing that this performance showed was that they can perform an instrumental version of their set because nobody could hear him.
You can't sing softly and then raise the volume to be loud either. The mic will not add power to your voice, just volume. If you're singing those rock songs you want to have power in your voice, not some wimpy dude whimpering into the mic. The reason you'd prefer to do this is because you are hesitant about performing in front of an audience - you can't even practice at home!


Cheers man - totally agree with what you're saying though, its at best a 'stepping stone' to performing with a mic...
but though it seems logically obvious that no-one could hear me singing (unless they were on the front, apparently), obviously I could hear myself and psychologically assumed that others could as well.

Before though, I think you may have misread what I said - I know it wasnt very clear but i wasnt saing use the mic just to amplify a soft voice, I said if anything I'd feel more confident singing powerfully with a mic because you can sing at a level where you get a good tone out of your voice without it just overpowering everything else.

I do quite a bit of public speaking, and I always feel a bit daft speaking really loudly and projecting my voice when I'm just practicing to myself, so literally cannot do it. But when I'm in front of an audience it just feels 'right' and I can do it fine. I know from a technical standpoint singing is much harder but, thats how I work psychologically :S
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#32
Quote by AlanHB
Wow performing without a mic! That truly is down in the mix.

In the interests of adding something constructive to this thread, I just want to say that the OP is still in for a shock when he performs with a mic. The only thing that this performance showed was that they can perform an instrumental version of their set because nobody could hear him.

Your voice is meant to be in the front of the mix, the other instruments support your voice, not the other way around. Most people will want to hear the vocals, and they want it up loud. So should you if you're a singer.

You can't sing softly and then raise the volume to be loud either. The mic will not add power to your voice, just volume. If you're singing those rock songs you want to have power in your voice, not some wimpy dude whimpering into the mic. The reason you'd prefer to do this is because you are hesitant about performing in front of an audience - you can't even practice at home!

It's admirable that you want to sing, and you should go ahead and learn. Singing lessons are a great thing to get though, and also tape yourself singing and listen to it. You don't want the first time you hear your voice to be on stage through a fold back.


Couldn't agree with you more. If I've learned anything as a singer, it's that power is that if you want to sound your best you need to have the confidence and you need to belt, and show that you're putting the power into your voice. That seems to be the main difference I hear between mediocre amateur bands, and great amateur bands is that the singer is using the microphone, not hiding behind it.
#33
Well hiring a vocalist who doesn't show up for anything is a sign right away you should fire the person. You should just give it a shot atleast for this gig- don't cancel. And use other people's feedback- ask them their opinoins about your singing. If it doesn't seem right then go for another vocalist.
#34
Quote by PuppetMaster91
Hey

So our bands got a first gig on tuesday, we only hired a vocalist last week but he's just not being showing up to practices and he's hard to get in contact with...so unless he suddenly materialises between now and tuesday we have two choices:

1) cancel the gig, though we've already told the venue / mates to come
2) I (rhythm guitarist) can step in and sing

We're doing a three song set of Enter Sandman, Smells Like Teen Spirit and Land of Confusion.

So to me there's two problems here - firstly, learning to play guitar whilst singing. But, I'm pretty confident I can learn it in the time - I can play much harder songs than these technically so have quite a bit of headroom whilst playing them to sing as well, and if I do trip up on anything, I can just stop playing for a bit, and let the lead guitarist (who will be playing the rhythm parts unless he's in a solo) do it whilst I sing.


However, the main problem is...can I sing?

Vocally, I've never really tried apart from in the car / as a laugh or whatever. I'm no Bruce Dickinson, but I can sing in key and hold a note. I have never sung in front of an actual audience.

So just wanted to get a few opinions, is singing really 80% the confidence to sing in front of people, and 20% your actual vocal ability? So, can pretty much anyone, with the right amount of confidence, pull off at least a 'passable' singing voice?

Or should we cancel the gig :P

Cheers


Dude, you know if you can sing or not. Play a show that your prepared for ...... period.
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#35
Singing Sandman is EASY. I play rhythm and sing too. We knocked it out on the first day of prac.

For teen spirit, it's a little harder. I suggest sitting down and playing to the song and sing it and eventually you'll get it
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#36
You don't have to be able to actually sing to sing Enter Sandman and Smells Like Teen Spirit. I'm not sure about Land of Confusion, but looking it up on Google it appears that its by Genesis and Disturbed covered it. So you probably don't have to be able to sing for any of those. You'll be fine.
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#37
Quote by PuppetMaster91
Just figured I'd update you guys on how it went
and @5150rando - I know how you feel...give singing a try through online resources, if you think you can sound decent look into a tutor maybe? If you're a good lyricist and have songs 'in you' you want to get out...don't put it off to someone else to screw up unless you have to!
And


Firstly, congrats man! Sounds like you had fun! lol. I definitely have songs in me, but I doubt I have the songwriting skills! lol, but yeah. I think your story kinda inspired me, ya know. I'm gonna be practicing, I think I'm starting to get a good idea about where my voice is and where it isn't... I mean, look at Brian Johnson! Without a band I doubt people would think he sounds good... In my opinion its all about connecting your voice to the song... Haha, now I"m jazzed about recording me again, lol.
I am a Stephenist
#38
Quote by PuppetMaster91

Before though, I think you may have misread what I said - I know it wasnt very clear but i wasnt saing use the mic just to amplify a soft voice, I said if anything I'd feel more confident singing powerfully with a mic because you can sing at a level where you get a good tone out of your voice without it just overpowering everything else.


Quote by take_it_t

If I've learned anything as a singer, it's that power is that if you want to sound your best you need to have the confidence and you need to belt, and show that you're putting the power into your voice. That seems to be the main difference I hear between mediocre amateur bands, and great amateur bands is that the singer is using the microphone, not hiding behind it.


A lot of beginner singers will sing softer, and turn up the volume louder because they feel they sound better doing this. A "good tone". This is not the case the case in reality. It just sounds "breathy" and "whispy". Nervousness = short, sharp breaths = "bad tone". However they do use the "overpowering everything else" argument to justify their actions.

Now nobody can sing so loud as to drown out their band. Except for Jack Black, who is so awesome he too does not need a microphone.

It's a good step singing in front of people if it looks like you're miming. Now lets add sound and work from there.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#39
Quote by AlanHB
A lot of beginner singers will sing softer, and turn up the volume louder because they feel they sound better doing this. A "good tone". This is not the case the case in reality. It just sounds "breathy" and "whispy". Nervousness = short, sharp breaths = "bad tone". However they do use the "overpowering everything else" argument to justify their actions.

Now nobody can sing so loud as to drown out their band. Except for Jack Black, who is so awesome he too does not need a microphone.

It's a good step singing in front of people if it looks like you're miming. Now lets add sound and work from there.


Awesome Jack Black reference there.

And I agree in what your saying. The "overpowering" your band excuse is utter bull. You just put the volume lower when you start to overpower the band.

For TS, I can advice singing lessons. I had them for only a year, but it has helped me greatly for some techniques.

Also, the reason you thought you were good is because you were probably screaming your longs out. COnsidering you did'nt have a mic and all. I once had a too loud monitoring. I asked him too turn my vocals down a bit, so that I would give more power which would improve the overall vocals.
#40
I have heard terrible versions of Enter Sandman and Teen Spirit. They were terrible because the singer was terrible. Yes, you DO have to be able to sing to do those. Land of Confusion... yeah, you have to be able to sing to pull that one off too.

Great advice on the lessons. There is really no other effective way of learning good technique. Without an instructor, you really don't *know* if you're doing it right or not.

About belting.... that scares me. It implies forcing the air out of your lungs and towards the back of the room with as much force as you can muster. That is bad. Volume in your voice (aka projection) comes from a combination of aiming the voice at the hard palate instead of your throat or any other soft tissue, and achieving good resonance. Shouting will only wreck your vocal cords.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
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