#1
so i had a big issue with spring noise. i tried putting electric tape on the claws on the thingy that holds the springs (sorry dont know whats its called). i still had some noise so i thought of packing the cavity with tissue paper.(steve vai did it) i put 3 pieces in really compact and i thought that if you put it in really tight that it might help sustain. it helped alot with the noise which is now gone. when i plugged my guitar in it sounded totally different and alot better. i dont know about the sustain but it definitely sounded thicker and rounder in tone. i was wondering if anyone else has had these effects. i think it could really define your sound if you do it right.
#2
paul gilbert uses foam inside the spaces around his pickups. I had to stick foam in too, but that's because the pickup was moving inside the cavity.
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#3
Eddie Van Halen claims that foam in the trem cavity makes the guitar sound stuffy

I usually string a rubber band through them, but I've been playing without one lately.
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
#5
just around the springs? i stuffed a ton behind the trem. i clearly dont use it. i thought if the space between the sustain block and wood was filled tightly it would add density to the whole body and help tone. or something like that
#7
You can use a length of plastic/rubber tubing that you cut to length and slide inside the springs. It looks way cleaner.
#8
Quote by Pikka Bird
You can use a length of plastic/rubber tubing that you cut to length and slide inside the springs. It looks way cleaner.


This, but I use tubing outside the strings.

six of one, half dozen of the other.
#9
Quote by worldwidechance
so i had a big issue with spring noise. i tried putting electric tape on the claws on the thingy that holds the springs (sorry dont know whats its called). i still had some noise so i thought of packing the cavity with tissue paper.(steve vai did it) i put 3 pieces in really compact and i thought that if you put it in really tight that it might help sustain. it helped alot with the noise which is now gone. when i plugged my guitar in it sounded totally different and alot better. i dont know about the sustain but it definitely sounded thicker and rounder in tone. i was wondering if anyone else has had these effects. i think it could really define your sound if you do it right.


i doubt tissue paper would have any effect on sustain. you only hear a difference because you want to think there is. if anything it'd probably have the opposite effect, if it would have had an affect in the first place.

anyway....

if spring noise is the problem then your spring claw is too slack, so to speak. the springs shouldn't be vibrating enough to rattle or make any sort of noise against the claw. move the claw further back (tighten up the 2 screws holding the claw in place basically). that should stop the springs from doing whatever odd noise they are making.

Quote by worldwidechance
so i had a big issue with spring noise. i tried putting electric tape on the claws on the thingy that holds the springs (sorry dont know whats its called)


if your guitar's ground is soldered to the claw you might not want to put electrical tape where the springs come into contact with it... unless of course you have some sort of electrocution fetish.
Last edited by noisefarmer at Jul 20, 2009,
#10
Quote by noisefarmer
if spring noise is the problem then your spring claw is too slack, so to speak. the springs shouldn't be vibrating enough to rattle or make any sort of noise against the claw. move the claw further back (tighten up the 2 screws holding the claw in place basically). that should stop the springs from doing whatever odd noise they are making.

How could it be too slack when, in the case of the bridge being leveled, there should be an even amount of tension on both strings AND springs?
Then there's this band called Slice The Cake...

Bunch of faggots putting random riffs together and calling it "progressive" deathcore.
Stupid name.
Probably picked "for teh lulz"

Mod in UG's Official Gain Whores
#11
Quote by noisefarmer
if spring noise is the problem then your spring claw is too slack, so to speak. the springs shouldn't be vibrating enough to rattle or make any sort of noise against the claw. move the claw further back (tighten up the 2 screws holding the claw in place basically). that should stop the springs from doing whatever odd noise they are making.

What?! When you tighten the trem claw's screws the springs simply pull the bridge closer to the body. The tension on them stays exactly the same (unless the bridge is already flat against the guitar). Thats what returns the guitar to tune. It has nothing to do with slackness...


Quote by noisefarmer
if your guitar's ground is soldered to the claw you might not want to put electrical tape where the springs come into contact with it... unless of course you have some sort of electrocution fetish.

What on earth are you talking about? Are trying to say that the voltage created by the guitar's pickups are large enoguh to electrocute you? That's rediculous...
Last edited by supergerbil at Jul 20, 2009,
#12
Quote by supergerbil
What?! When you tighten the trem claw's screws the springs simply pull the bridge closer to the body. The tension on them stays exactly the same (unless the bridge is already flat against the guitar). Thats what returns the guitar to tune. It has nothing to do with slackness...


i know that. i also know that my springs don't make any noise so i assume (having learned nothing from that old benny hill skit) that the TS was messing about, loosened his trem claw to get the springs on and never bothered tightening it back up which is leading to his peculiar problem of rattling springs because if they are loose enough to rattle there probably isn't any tension on them at all.


What on earth are you talking about? Are trying to say that the voltage created by the guitar's pickups are large enoguh to electrocute you? That's rediculous...


do you know what happens when you are playing an electric guitar (edit: plugged into an amp, obviously) that isn't grounded? you become the ground and any sort of electrical spike, or poorly wired outlet has the potential to send electricity from the guitar to where it wants to go, which is to ground. since the guitar's ground is faulty that current will take the next best path of least resistance which in this case is through your body.

nowhere did i say or imply anything regarding pickups having the potential to electrocute.
Last edited by noisefarmer at Jul 20, 2009,
#13
Quote by noisefarmer
i know that. i also know that my springs don't make any noise so i assume (having learned nothing from that old benny hill skit) that the TS was messing about, loosened his trem claw to get the springs on and never bothered tightening it back up which is leading to his peculiar problem of rattling springs because if they are loose enough to rattle there probably isn't any tension on them at all.
This is a bad assumption.

Trem springs under tension, resonate. That's the issue here.

Quote by noisefarmer
if your guitar's ground is soldered to the claw you might not want to put electrical tape where the springs come into contact with it... unless of course you have some sort of electrocution fetish.
This idea is just plain stupid.

If you're looking to remove the string ground, just disconnect the wire to the claw.
But disconnecting the string ground or electrically insulating the springs is unwise.
The string ground is there for a reason. To electrically connect your body to ground via the strings and reduce the amount of hum and noise your body couples electromagnetically to the pickups and wiring.

Any concerns about electrocution are best dealt with by proper mains wiring and GFCI.
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#14
true. to the second part. You can get electrocuted from the amp. There is power going in the cable. Whenever i touch the tip of the cable and anything metal (strings, bridge) i feel static. Like when you rub your feet on carpet really hard and shock someone. It feels liek that but constant. It's amazingly awesome.
Jackson RR5 ivory w/ EMG 81/85
Jackson DX6 w/ SD Distortion & Dimarzio Super Distortion
Fender Starcaster Sunburst
Mesa/Boogie DC-3
Johnson JT50 Mirage
Ibanez TS-9
Morley Bad Horsie 2
Boss CE-5

ISP Decimator
Boss DD-6
Korg Pitchblack
#15
Quote by noisefarmer
do you know what happens when you are playing an electric guitar (edit: plugged into an amp, obviously) that isn't grounded? you become the ground and any sort of electrical spike, or poorly wired outlet has the potential to send electricity from the guitar to where it wants to go, which is to ground. since the guitar's ground is faulty that current will take the next best path of least resistance which in this case is through your body.

nowhere did i say or imply anything regarding pickups having the potential to electrocute.

But what does this have to do with electrical tape?
#16
Quote by Pikka Bird
But what does this have to do with electrical tape?


electrical tape isn't electrically conductive. if the trem claw is grounded and you put electrical tape around where the springs come into contact with the claw you end up disconnecting the bridge and the strings from ground, and that would not be a very smart thing to do at all.
#17
...

Strings are grounded to reduce noise when you touch them (i.e. play). Disconnecting the strings from ground poses no hazard whatsoever. Hell, if anything it's safer, since the strings aren't part of the circuit and juice can't get to you.

The only bad thing that comes from ungrounded strings is more noise.

There is no power going INTO the guitar cable. It's coming FROM the guitar, not going TO it. Any static or tingl you feel is leakage-to-ground from your amp.
#18
^Exactly... And in the event of a power surge, having the strings and bridge off the ground loop will just make sure the current does not have anywhere to go, and it will not pass through you to the ground.
#22
Quote by Pikka Bird
^I have been small-time zapped by a guitar at one point...
check the mains wiring that you're plugging your amp into in a situation like that. And always, Always, ALWAYS use a GFCI outlet or an extension cable with a GFCI built in.
Meadows
Quote by Jackal58
I release my inner liberal every morning when I take a shit.
Quote by SK8RDUDE411
I wont be like those jerks who dedicate their beliefs to logic and reaosn.
#23
i havnt had any problems with ungrounded wiring. even though the claws are taped. it has helped a little bit but so far tissue paper has been the best solution. im going to homedepot tomorrow to get some rubber tubing to put over the springs.