#1
What should I do to keep my steel-string guitar clean? I was also planning to clean up my classical guitar a bit, even though I don't use it as often, so let me know if there's anything specific I need for classical guitars rather than steel-string guitars.

Anyway, I read a PDF about maintaining and cleaning acoustic guitars by Martin:
http://www.mguitar.com/catalog/PDF/Care&Feeding.pdf
On page 4 in the Cleaning the Finish section it actually says wash the guitar with a warm, damp cloth. Does it mean a warm, damp cloth of water? And could I use a towel or should I use a shirt? (I haven't bought a guitar cleaning cloth yet.) I thought water makes wood rot. On top of that, what polish should I buy?

I also read this off Yahoo Answers:
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080126144838AAAQJM0
It says rosewood fretboards should be cleaned with fine steel wool. (Mine is indian rosewood.) I don't have that. What are other ways I can clean my fretboard?

What about strings? What can I do to clean them? I think I've seen something that polishes and cleans strings (some kinda brush... not sure if it had any solution on it or not) but I've only seen it once.

Here's the specs of my guitar if it helps:
http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Seagull-25th-Anniversary-Dreadnaught-Guitar?sku=516401
#2
I use some products made by dunlop, I got them at guitar center. I use some string oil, body wax, fretboard oil, etc. Mine came in a five pack and ran me about $25 US. I've used it for years and never had a problem with any of my guitars. Hope this helps.
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#3
#1. Use only microfiber cloths or all cotton cloths/rags whatever.
#2. Oil your fretboard with Lemon oil or Mineral Oil (Lemon oil is mineral oil + small amount of other stuff)
#3. If you are going to use steel wool on the fretboard/frets, use only i believe 0000 grade or 000 grade, I forget, it means super-ultra-mega fine.
#4. I would recommend against using a damp cloth on your body unless there is a bad smudge and then use the damp cloth a little and wipe it off with a dry one.
#4
Less is better, kind of
Don't polish your guitar often, it can be bad for the finish. A damp (wet with warm water and then squeeze out as much as you can) microfiber cloth or t-shirt is often the best way to clean. As long as there is no standing water on the wood, it will be fine.

Use lemon oil on your fretboard maybe once or twice a year, it should not be used regularly.
#6
Quote by ItsTheMatthias
What should I do to keep my steel-string guitar clean? I was also planning to clean up my classical guitar a bit, even though I don't use it as often, so let me know if there's anything specific I need for classical guitars rather than steel-string guitars.

Anyway, I read a PDF about maintaining and cleaning acoustic guitars by Martin:
http://www.mguitar.com/catalog/PDF/Care&Feeding.pdf
On page 4 in the Cleaning the Finish section it actually says wash the guitar with a warm, damp cloth. Does it mean a warm, damp cloth of water? Yes, it does indeed mean water since nothing else would be safe enough.And could I use a towel or should I use a shirt? (I haven't bought a guitar cleaning cloth yet.)Microfiber towels are best. Get them at Wal-Mart in automotive section. I thought water makes wood rot. It does if it's allowed to just sit on the wood for long periods of time. Damp is not the same as soaking wet. On top of that, what polish should I buy? I use and swear by Gerlitz products. Search for them on google.

I also read this off Yahoo Answers:
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080126144838AAAQJM0
It says rosewood fretboards should be cleaned with fine steel wool. (Mine is indian rosewood.) I don't have that. What are other ways I can clean my fretboard? The steel wool treatment for fretboards is to be done maybe 2 times a year. Otherwise, just wiping it down with a dry microfiber towel is sufficient after each session.

What about strings? What can I do to clean them? I think I've seen something that polishes and cleans strings (some kinda brush... not sure if it had any solution on it or not) but I've only seen it once. Linen works the best for wiping down strings that I've found so far. Same material as a bed sheet. It won't leave any lint behind. Even microfiber towels leave lint when wiping down the wound strings. Linen won't.

Here's the specs of my guitar if it helps:
http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Seagull-25th-Anniversary-Dreadnaught-Guitar?sku=516401



Answers inside your text in red. Also, why are you doubting what Martin has to say about cleaning guitars? I believe they have a bit of experience in the field.
#7
Nothing touches my guitars but warm breath and a sock. I find the un-mated socks tend to leave a better shine.
#8
Quote by LeftyDave
Answers inside your text in red. Also, why are you doubting what Martin has to say about cleaning guitars? I believe they have a bit of experience in the field.


Its always good to question the choices of this kind of stuff, since it lets you see the reasoning for it, you would learn some stuff and understand why you are doing something like that instead of the way you though. Its like when I said he could use mineral oil on his fretboard, I explained that he could use it because lemon oil is mostly mineral oil, and lemon oil is something used to condition fretboards. Its good to know the reasons why something is suggested outside of "Just do it" or "Well they should know what they are talking about." Dunlop recommends their polish and stuff because they make it. When you get down to it, its good to know "Because xxx polish is lemon oil." I mean what were people using before the company Dunlop made that stuff?
#9
Quote by Chaos Nil
Its always good to question the choices of this kind of stuff, since it lets you see the reasoning for it, you would learn some stuff and understand why you are doing something like that instead of the way you though. Its like when I said he could use mineral oil on his fretboard, I explained that he could use it because lemon oil is mostly mineral oil, and lemon oil is something used to condition fretboards. Its good to know the reasons why something is suggested outside of "Just do it" or "Well they should know what they are talking about." Dunlop recommends their polish and stuff because they make it. When you get down to it, its good to know "Because xxx polish is lemon oil." I mean what were people using before the company Dunlop made that stuff?


Water!