#1
I am currently looking at buying my first electric guitar.
The electric i am looking at has a tremolo bar. I have been doing a little research and i have heard mixed things about not being able drop tune if the guitar has a tremolo bar.
SO does a tremolo bar prevent you from drop tuning the guitar?
#2
The only problem with changing tuning will be if you get a floyd rose style tremelo (one that lets you make the pitch higher and lower). But yes if you get a floyd rose style trem then you're gonna have to either block your sustain block or adjust the springs for the lower tuning which I can explain if you need.
Last edited by hendrixism at Jul 20, 2009,
#3
it's not the bar you should worry about it's the bridge. is it floating? if it's floating then the bridge can go both ways (up and down) and that's not great for drop tunings. what guitar is it?
#4
Personally for me, no. And I have a Yamaha ERG (basically an entry level axe, though I find it punches well above it's weight).

Floyd Rose and other locking trem units are designed for use in drop tunings, the strings will hardly ever (if ever) come out of tune, even with extensive dive bombing.

Your only good option is to go the the shop and try one. Drop to say D tuning and just whammy like billy-o. Then check if it's still in tune or not.
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#5
the electric i am looking at is an Ibanez RG350EX
This electric has the system installed so that it will stay in tune even with constant use of the tremolo bar.
but will the tremolo bar prevent me from drop tuning (will i still be able to drop tune the guitar with the tremolo system installed)
Thanks for your helps
Last edited by rigoman28 at Jul 20, 2009,
#6
ah wait yeah i misread your original post. yes guitars with floating trems can go do drop tunings but the problem comes from changing between tunings and setting up the floyd everytime you change tunings.
#7
In all honesty that's a terrible choice for a starter guitar - start with something with a hard-tail or a vintage tremolo. Floyd's are a lot of work and you'll have your hands full with simply learning to play, there's no point in needlessly complicating things for you. A floating bridge could easily prevent you from getting past those fiyst few awkward months of getting to grips with the guitar simply by making things that bit more difficult.

They're a fair bit of work to maintain, and they need re-setting up if you want to mess around with tuning. They're designed to stay in tune, that being the case it means the trade-off is that changing tunings isn't straightforward. They also make playing more difficult, too much pressure on a string sends the others out of tune and too much pressure on the bridge will move it. When you're learning you're going to be very heavy-handed, it takes time to develop the control and finesse required to cope with a Floyd, if you start with one it'll just frustrate you no end.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Jul 20, 2009,
#8
Quote by rigoman28
the electric i am looking at is an Ibanez RG350EX
This electric has the system installed so that it will stay in tune even with constant use of the tremolo bar.
but will the tremolo bar prevent me from drop tuning (will i still be able to drop tune the guitar with the tremolo system installed)
Thanks for your helps


yes you can still drop tune but it's much more harder and complicated then on a guitar with a hardtail.
#9
ok that makes sense. Because i have been playing acoustic for the last two years i have over time come up with a list of songs I want to learn on electric a number of them being in drop tuning.
#10
another area that you wanna make sure is good are your tuners, obviously. You'll probably have to retrofit some if you want some v good ones.

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Quote by necrosis1193
Somewhere in a concert hall in Sweden, you have just caused Yngwie Malmsteen physical pain. You also caused him to catch on fire.


Quote by frusciante.ve
I like that new song of theirs that goes all "peeeeeaaaas wiiiill comeeeeee toooo meeeee"


Just because you Seymour Duncan, doesn't mean you Seymour Dunshould
#11
Quote by rigoman28
ok that makes sense. Because i have been playing acoustic for the last two years i have over time come up with a list of songs I want to learn on electric a number of them being in drop tuning.


if you're songs don't require the use of a floating bridge then i suggest sticking with a guitar that has a hardtail bridge.
#14
Quote by steven seagull
In all honesty that's a terrible choice for a starter guitar - start with something with a hard-tail or a vintage tremolo. Floyd's are a lot of work and you'll have your hands full with simply learning to play, there's no point in needlessly complicating things for you. A floating bridge could easily prevent you from getting past those fiyst few awkward months of getting to grips with the guitar simply by making things that bit more difficult.

They're a fair bit of work to maintain, and they need re-setting up if you want to mess around with tuning. They're designed to stay in tune, that being the case it means the trade-off is that changing tunings isn't straightforward. They also make playing more difficult, too much pressure on a string sends the others out of tune and too much pressure on the bridge will move it. When you're learning you're going to be very heavy-handed, it takes time to develop the control and finesse required to cope with a Floyd, if you start with one it'll just frustrate you no end.


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#15
So even though i Have been playing for two years, I just try to avoid a guitar fitted with a tremolo if it is my first electric?
#16
Different gauge strings effect a floyd rose too!

I agree with SEAGULL, If your only just starting out on electric surely there isn't that many songs you want to play that uses a tremolo bar. I've got an Ibanez S series and i never use the trem anymore. Infact i usually unscrew the arm when i use it. The novelty of having a trem bar soon wares off, then it just p*sses you off!!!!
#17
Basically with a floating trem you're gonna have to do a slight setup change whenever you want to drop tunings. If you don't your bridge is going to get sunk or be raised and you won't be able to stay in the tuning you want. Here's some directions I made with a pic from wikipedia:
Last edited by hendrixism at Jul 20, 2009,
#18
Quote by rigoman28
So even though i Have been playing for two years, I just try to avoid a guitar fitted with a tremolo if it is my first electric?



Upto you. Spend your time playing on a guitar OR p*ssin about with screwdrivers and allen keys.

The floyd rose is an advanced system, get to grips with a 'one-way' trem first.

They look simple things but there not.
#19
Quote by rigoman28
So even though i Have been playing for two years, I just try to avoid a guitar fitted with a tremolo if it is my first electric?


Depends their are a few different type of tremolo's which can be broken down to two types the first is the full floating, and then you have the dive only. the full floating trem's you want to avoid on a first guitar since these tend to require a few more minutes setting up and a head**** if you have no idea what you are doing.

The second type 'dive only' tremolo is okay for a first guitar. It doesn't have quite the same range as a full floating bridge but you can still dive down to get the strings floppy. The flaw to this is that if your strings aren't strung properly or if your nut isn't allowing the string to move freely then you will suffer from some tuning problems. Though this bridge is easy to change tunings on.

There's nothing wrong with having a guitar with a full floating bridge as your first and only electric you may run into a few problems which may or may not piss you off. Just stick with a dive only tremolo (vintage style tremolo, and yes to those knowledgeable I know these can and supposedly are meant to be floating but for this context it's best to be left as a dive only) or stick with a hardtail bridge.
#21
A Floyd is not bad for downtuning, just a pain in the arse to actually do it, as you have to unscrew, tune, check bridge, rescrew.

Personally, that isn't too much trouble for lil old me
Quote by necrosis1193
Somewhere in a concert hall in Sweden, you have just caused Yngwie Malmsteen physical pain. You also caused him to catch on fire.


Quote by frusciante.ve
I like that new song of theirs that goes all "peeeeeaaaas wiiiill comeeeeee toooo meeeee"


Just because you Seymour Duncan, doesn't mean you Seymour Dunshould