#1
He used some normal ones but the ones that he came up with himself (I'm assuming he did anyway), did he use much theory or just play what sounded good?
#3
If you're reffering to the "Hendrix chord" (dominant 7#9). That's just the blues scale
#4
he didnt really come up with too much, he just used a little bit of stuff more common in jazz. but for the stuff he made famous ie. x7678x is just a E7#9 which isnt uncommon if you play jazz guitar
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#5
A freind played the piano and showed him loads of piano chords that Hendrix liked the sound of
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#6
This isn't an example of one but what's the chord he uses on the first note of little wing? the 12th fret one.

An example of what I'm talking about is on his version of Like a Rolling Stone at Monterey, he stretches about 6 frets if that helps find the one I'm talking about. Can't remember the tab for it but my teacher showed me once and said he couldn't work out what chord it was.
#8
Hendrix mostly played chords that are pretty standard in blues, funk and jazz. A lot of 7ths and 9ths.
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#11
Quote by Freepower
"Theory" doesn't work like that. It's something you understand, not something you "use" in such a blunt way.


Yes. This. Theory is not a tool for creating music, it is a way of understanding it. Anything Hendrix and any other musician has ever done can be explained by theory, so the question doesn't really make sense.
#14
Quote by tom1thomas1
did he use much theory or just play what sounded good?


As Freepower said, theory is something you're aware of. It's not necessarily a tool. However, to answer your question, Hendrix didn't know much theory at all.
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#15
Theory is a system for humans to put things in perspective.

This being said, I'm pretty sure that Hendrix (and every "good" musician), knows what he is "doing".

The system being knowing the relation ship of the stuff.

IE. Knowing that note "x" and "x" give the sound "x" over "x" chord.

Awareness is the keyword.

So it's not a matter on whether Hendrix saw things "through theory", but that he had an awareness of how notes relate, and what sound does what on an emotional or conceptual level.

1 more example if still confused;

You have a Chair, and you sit on it.

If you name it something else, the action is still the same (this being a human resting his weight on a chair).

Knowing that playing A, C, D, E, G notes over an Am chord is pentatonic is irrelevant in it's sound.

Playing those notes over that chord always give the same sound, and thus how you name it is irrelevant.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Jul 20, 2009,
#16
Quote by tom1thomas1
did he use much theory


^ no, but you can if you want to analyze it.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 20, 2009,
#17
Theory is basically naming the sounds, a lot of great musicans/guitarists know exactly what sounds right but can't name it.

Like BB king, I've heard in an interview that he doesn't know any scale. Truth is, he does know the scales, he just can't tell the notes or the names of the scale
#18
Quote by Antis0cial
Theory is basically naming the sounds, a lot of great musicans/guitarists know exactly what sounds right but can't name it.

Like BB king, I've heard in an interview that he doesn't know any scale. Truth is, he does know the scales, he just can't tell the notes or the names of the scale


BB King did not use theory, if that's what your trying to say.
shred is gaudy music
#19
Quote by GuitarMunky
BB King did not use theory, if that's what your trying to say.


didnt we JUST come to the conclusion that theory isnt a tool that you "use", rather its something you understand.
#20
Quote by flea's trumpet
didnt we JUST come to the conclusion that theory isnt a tool that you "use", rather its something you understand.


You may have, but I wasn't quoting you was I?

btw, the term WE implies that you were part of coming up with that conclusion..... but this is your 1st post.

also, any knowledge can be "used".
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jul 20, 2009,
#21
You don't USE knowledge, including theory. You can APPLY knowledge to something, but even if you don't, the knowledge (theory) can be used to explain it.
#22
Quote by timeconsumer09
You don't USE knowledge, including theory. You can APPLY knowledge to something, but even if you don't, the knowledge (theory) can be used to explain it.


^
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#23
hendrix never studied any theory if thats what you are looking for. but he learned from watching and listening. he played in a bunch of R&B bands way back in the day. during this time he learned how to follow chords. he learned a couple of basic inversions and learned how to create little fills to go with the chord.

someone also mentioned that someone showed him some chord on piano. this is also true but that happened a little later down the road. crosstown traffic is an example of this. jimi actually played the piano on that. his friend showed him some chords and he liked them and he just copied them.

now we can use "theory" to break down what he did but he never really "used" theory to construct anything in his playing. but its all the same thing. theory is just putting music into words and labels we can understand so that we can better communicate musical ideas with other musicians and to also speed up the learning process of new musicians. the concepts jimi learned from records and people on the road when he was turing with R&B bands are the same as the concepts you could learn in a theory text book. so while jimi never had formal theory lessons, he knew what he was doing.
#24
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
hendrix never studied any theory if thats what you are looking for. but he learned from watching and listening. he played in a bunch of R&B bands way back in the day. during this time he learned how to follow chords. he learned a couple of basic inversions and learned how to create little fills to go with the chord.

someone also mentioned that someone showed him some chord on piano. this is also true but that happened a little later down the road. crosstown traffic is an example of this. jimi actually played the piano on that. his friend showed him some chords and he liked them and he just copied them.

now we can use "theory" to break down what he did but he never really "used" theory to construct anything in his playing. but its all the same thing. theory is just putting music into words and labels we can understand so that we can better communicate musical ideas with other musicians and to also speed up the learning process of new musicians. the concepts jimi learned from records and people on the road when he was turing with R&B bands are the same as the concepts you could learn in a theory text book. so while jimi never had formal theory lessons, he knew what he was doing.


Well said. The only thing I would disagree with is the idea that what Jimi did is the "same thing" as studying theory. I know what your trying to say, but still I'd say that Jimi wasn't focusing on "concepts" in an analytical way, but rather sounds. Some of the sounds he chose are consistent with concepts you could learn about in theory, but his approach was likely not analytical. I see no reason to tie in the word "theory" to what Hendrix was doing.

semantics aside, your post was right on overall.
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#25
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well said. The only thing I would disagree with is the idea that what Jimi did is the "same thing" as studying theory. I know what your trying to say, but still I'd say that Jimi wasn't focusing on "concepts" in an analytical way, but rather sounds. Some of the sounds he chose are consistent with concepts you could learn about in theory, but his approach was likely not analytical. I see no reason to tie in the word "theory" to what Hendrix was doing.

semantics aside, your post was right on overall.

well things like simple inversions and scale switching to follow chords are something he did that could be learned from theory. his chord voicings would be another. thats what i ment by it being the same thing. i just ment you could learn chord construction if you wanted, but like henrdix you could learn the same things by watching and listening. which i actually prefer to do.
#26
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
well things like simple inversions and scale switching to follow chords are something he did that could be learned from theory. his chord voicings would be another. thats what i ment by it being the same thing. i just ment you could learn chord construction if you wanted, but like henrdix you could learn the same things by watching and listening. which i actually prefer to do.


Well said.
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#27
Thanks for information guys, nice discussion, I don't know scales too and I'm trying to learn as Hendrix did but with guitar pro...
#28
Quote by Freepower
"Theory" doesn't work like that. It's something you understand, not something you "use" in such a blunt way.

Agreed. Theory is rarely prescriptive and usually descriptive. You use it to describe stuff.

And not really. A lot of the chord progressions Hendrix used were copied from other jazz musicians. Surprisingly, Hendrix grew up around a lot of blues and jazz musicians, which is where he learnt his chops. Something makes me doubt if he knew about dominant and predominate chords.
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#29
Summary: Hendrix knew what sounded good. His experience told him that, though he was probably unable to explain in musical terms why this was so.

Just to throw something new out there..... I use theory to help me write. If I know, for instance, that I'm in the key of D and I'm looking for a chord, my knowledge of theory tells me to go to A, G, Bm, Em, or F#m as likely candidates. That saves me a lot of time farting around with chords that probably won't work. If I'm putting together the chorus of that same song and am looking to write a harmony to go against the lead vocal, and the lead vocal is singing a D, I know right away that the F# above is probably a good place to start.

As an analogy, if I'm putting together a puzzle and am assembling the outer edge of the puzzle, I know that I need to look for other pieces with a straight edge. This saves time, as the person without knowledge of how puzzles go together could conceivably try every piece in the box. Mine is built in a quarter of the time.

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