#1
I've been trying out the Lydian mode for the past few days, and I can't get it to sound right. I just can't seem to get past the augmented fourth. Does it sound different to the audience than to the performer? Would it help if I played over a rhythm track, and if so, what chord progressions bring out the feel of the Lydian mode?
#2
to find the best sound for any mode, i suggest having someone play the chord of that mode, say, A Lydian, play an A major chord then solo over just that. that way you have a good feeling of what to expect and a good foundation before you get into more complex progressions (progressions tend to make you want to play in a different mode than what youre practicing, deviating from the real sound of the mode.)
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#3
I don't know about progressions, but definitely do a quick recording to see how it sounds to yourself played back.
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#4
Yes playing it over a rhythm track would be the best way to find the 'sound' of the scale, if you don't know what chords to use you should read more about harmonizing scales, but to make it easier for you:

1:Maj (Lydian is a 'major sounding' mode, start with a major chord/variant for the root note)
2:Maj
3:Min
4: Diminshed
5:Maj
6:Min
7:Min

Hope that makes sense.

EDIT: Because of stupid emoticons
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Last edited by Serpentarius at Jul 20, 2009,
#5
Playing over a backing track is pretty much the only way to get the correct sound of the mode in a practical sense. If you're actually trying to right something modal, visit the mode sticky and click on the third and last link in that thread to find out how to right modal chord progressions, and then try soloing over those.

If you just want to hear what it sounds like, hit your low E and let it ring as you play E Lydian on the rest of the strings. That's called a drone note and it's a quick and easy way to hear the sound of any mode.
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#6
Quote by Serpentarius
Yes playing it over a rhythm track would be the best way to find the 'sound' of the scale, if you don't know what chords to use you should read more about harmonizing scales, but to make it easier for you:

1:Maj (Lydian is a 'major sounding' mode, start with a major chord/variant for the root note)
2:Maj
3:Min
4: Diminshed
5:Maj
6:Min
7:Min

Hope that makes sense.

EDIT: Because of stupid emoticons


Yes, I know which chords to use. But what I was asking for was a little different. Like in a Major scale, you could use a I-IV-V progression to emphasize the sound of the scale. What type of progression emphasizes the sound of the Lydian mode most strongly?


Edit:

Quote by Eastwinn
If you're actually trying to right something modal, visit the mode sticky and click on the third and last link in that thread to find out how to right modal chord progressions, and then try soloing over those.


Thank you very much.
Last edited by Erick vonZipper at Jul 20, 2009,
#7
LoL I forgot about that link. Emphasize on the II chord, It brings out Lydians flavor IMO.
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#8
I find a chord vamp between I and II really sounds the "most" Lydian to me. Because it makes use of the #4, which really is the interval that makes Lydian sound Lydian.
#9
Quote by Erick vonZipper
I've been trying out the Lydian mode for the past few days, and I can't get it to sound right. I just can't seem to get past the augmented fourth. Does it sound different to the audience than to the performer? Would it help if I played over a rhythm track, and if so, what chord progressions bring out the feel of the Lydian mode?



Try playing it over a static Maj7 chord. For example play C lydian over CMaj7

The #4 is heard as an upper extension (#11)
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#10
It might be sounding odd because you're so used to hearing the major scale that the #4 sounds wrong - I'd record a vamp over the static major chord then just play the scale straight up and down a single octave a few times til it starts to sound right, before you try improvising with it - then when you start improvising keep going back to the root a lot more than normal, or even use the root as a pedal tone, just to help embed the sound of it in your head. Once your ears get used to it then go play
#11
For C lydian simply use a D/C --> C progression. The D/C contains the flavor note of the scale (#4).
#12
Everyone seems to use the II-I progression for lydian vamps.
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#13
It is abit unsetteling because it consist of so many whole steps in the start. but then the #4 goes nicely up to the 5th.

Record a major7 chord, then play Lydian ove it and it will add that #11 feel to the chord. Listen to other peopel playgin with it too for some ideas.
#14
I prefer to solo in Lydian over a static II7- IM7 vamp. It just sounds better. The #4 is, in my opinion, more of an acquired taste. There are always instances where it will sound good, but to get used to it you have to hear it alot and try and apply it wherever.