#1
(In C Major)

If i start on C and i end on C.. my guitar riff sounds complete ( yay)
and if i use the 5th note in the scale.. G .. its a good note to use to resolve to the root, note C
C D E F G A B
Is this correct?

now i discovered that there are modes

C -> Ionian
D -> Dorian
E -> Phrygian
F -> Lydian
G -> Mixolydian
A -> Aeolian (A minor i guess) relative minor?
B -> Locrian

so my question is..

if i use the Dorian mode..
and i start on D.. and i end on D.. will that make my melody complete
or do i have to end on the root of the scale?
#4
Quote by MrJulius
Before we answer, does it sound complete to you?

im going to touch on what you said because it is music theory and not music fact
it is your music and you can make it any way you want it and there is no right and wrong way
Quote by scott58
Worst? I don't know. My buddies old MG 10 until we turned it into a cup holder and ash tray.
#6
i know!! but just can you tell me please!
if i start on D in dorian mode in C major.. in order for me to end the melody do i have to end on the D or on the root note?
#7


Ignore those posts, TS.

Anyway, if you play C major starting and ending with D, that doesn't mean you're playing D Dorian. It just means you're playing C major starting and ending with D. The harmony must imply a mode in order for you to actually play one, which can be done with a modal vamp. I suggest getting a better grasp on major and minor theory before you begin working with modes.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#8
Quote by Eastwinn



It just means you're playing C major starting and ending with D.



This
#9
Quote by Fetcha200
do i have to end on the D or on the root note?

You have to structure the melody to imply the tonic is D. Ending on it might help, try putting heavy emphasis on the tonic you want and its dominant, so for D dorian put emphasis on D and A. Make sure the harmony also pulls towards the D.

EDIT: Look into some Miles Davis, he was a big fan of the dorian mode.
Last edited by pwrmax at Jul 21, 2009,
#10
Quote by porker117
im going to touch on what you said because it is music theory and not music fact
it is your music and you can make it any way you want it and there is no right and wrong way


You don't know what the word "theory" means.

Anyway, TS, read the Goddamned sticky.
Someones knowledge of guitar companies spelling determines what amps you can own. Really smart people can own things like Framus because they sound like they might be spelled with a "y" but they aren't.
#11
Quote by Archeo Avis
You don't know what the word "theory" means.

Anyway, TS, read the Goddamned sticky.


Remember, posts like this are like shadowboxing in public. In your mind you're thinking "Wow, I'm badass, no ones gonna mess with me." But everyone else is pointing, laughing, and saying "what a tool."

And TS, since you said you're still a beginner, I don't think you're ready for modes. To be ready for modes you need to know the major scale, intervals, triads, scale degrees, tension and resolution, harmony, and tonic pitch.

And you really don't need to know modes just yet. They're more likely to confuse you than anything, especially with the vast misunderstandings about them. Theres a lot of great music out there you can study, enjoy, and play, and most of it isn't modal.
#12
Quote by Axe720
Remember, posts like this are like shadowboxing in public. In your mind you're thinking "Wow, I'm badass, no ones gonna mess with me." But everyone else is pointing, laughing, and saying "what a tool."



Not much else to say in this thread but if you still strive to learn about modes I recommend this.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5K-DbaaI4wc
#14
Quote by Archeo Avis
You don't know what the word "theory" means.

Anyway, TS, read the Goddamned sticky.
Archeo is right - if slightly abrupt lol TS, the sticky will give you a much more complete picture, and make much more sense than us trying to explain it piecemeal. Thats why its there

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