#1
We can do it with:
1. two bars, using index and ring finger
2. a single bar and individual fingers for the rest of the notes

I find the two bars approach much faster and easier, but muting the E string seems inevitable and it just doesn't sound right.

The second approach gives better sound but I found it quite clumsy and slow in transitions.

Is there a correct or recommended way to finger these chords?

Is single bar approach really clumsy and slow or is it just practice?
#2
It's just a matter of practice. If you cheap your way out of it, you'll never have it sounding decent, so work on it until it's down.
#3
The "two-barre" approach has always sounded much nicer to me. Learning the other way can only be a good thing though; stick with it!
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#5
kind of struggling with this myself. i can play them ok using the two bar approach i think the other way is too hard to get into and becomes more difficult up the fretboard as its hard to fit all three fingers on the smaller frets. i dont know its a tricky one
#6
Learn both. As mmohmygod said, it's hard to fit all your fingers in higher up on the fretboard. So if you're comfortable with fingering each note, you might as well learn to use the 2-barre method so you can play higher up if you ever need to. If you're comfortable with the 2-barre method, why not learn to play with all your fingers on a note? Learning something new never hurt anyone. =)
#7
So, if I'm correct, the prefered way is a 2-barre approach as 1-barre indeed is clumsy.

Do you manage not to mute the E string, or it can't be avoided?

Does it sound right to you, even with the muted E string?
#8
I do the 2 barre, but i've managed to get my second barre to bend up a bit off the fretboard so i'm playing the three strings without muting the e
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#9
Quote by hazel-leo
okkk....


OK!

Some people find one or the other particularly easy for various reasons. I'd recommend getting somewhat of a handle on both and seeing how they work all over the fretboard for you. Also, don't forget that there's tonnes of chords based off that basic shape and it can be very handy to have both down when a particular version of it comes up.
#10
If you don't mute the E string and play it alongside the barre you get a second inversion of the chord which is quite nice sounding. So if you try to strum the 5 strings but accidently hit the E string, it's no problem and may actually make it sound a lil bit better in certain situations.

The 2 barre is easier to my hands, I find it easier to hold down the strings in comparison to the later. However with the 2 barre I can't hit a Sus2 as easy as the one barre.
Last edited by Zvahl at Jul 21, 2009,
#11
Quote by Zvahl
If you don't mute the E string and play it alongside the barre you get a second inversion of the chord which is quite nice sounding.

I actually meant the high E. Should've written 'e' to avoid the confusion, sorry.
Anyway, nice comment.


Quote by Ninjake
i've managed to get my second barre to bend up a bit off the fretboard

all the other 2-barre players, do you also manage not to mute the e?
#12
Yeah, I was struggling with it when I started out, until I saw a pro doing the two-barre way. I have a ring finger that bends back well, so muting the e was never a problem. It leaves you free to do some fancy stuff with your pinky and you can extend the first finger to the E string for a more powerful sound (or leave it open on an E chord and get the bass note in as well).
Though classic fingering says the single barre is correct, just try it with a rocking 12-bar, or Born to be Wild and you learn to compromise - fast.
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#13
Try using your pinky rather than your ring finger and just keep practicing E shaped barre chords
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#14
Ok, thanks everyone for shedding some light on this.
I guess I'll try to perfect the 2-barre way. If I could just bend that ring finger enough to let the e string sound...
Will also try pinky instead of the ring finger, but I feel I'de be better off fighting it the right way.
#15
I wouldn't recommend using your pinky instead of your ring finger because you wouldn't be able to hit extra notes alongside that chord, most notably the Sus4 chord. I have no problem with the e string getting mutted but I've been strengthening my barre hand for a while. If you want to work on practicing it, I recommend arpeggiating the notes while fretting an minor 7th barre. Perhaps you may want to work finger picking while doing so, maybe even hybrid picking.

E-1
A-2
D-1
G-1
B-1
e-1

Oh yea, also focus on a lot of barre changes because from experience they'll tire you out quickly. Here's A form for a minor 7th barre if you're curious

E-1
A-1
D-3
G-1
B-2
e-1
Last edited by Zvahl at Jul 22, 2009,
#16
I wouldn't recommend using your pinky instead of your ring finger because you wouldn't be able to hit extra notes alongside that chord, most notably the Sus4 chord. I have no problem with the e string getting mutted but I've been strengthening my barre hand for a while. If you want to work on practicing it, I recommend arpeggiating the notes while fretting an minor 7th barre. Perhaps you may want to work finger picking while doing so, maybe even hybrid picking.


thanks
#17
I would strongly advise against using a 2 barr method, it just isnt very efficient. you put pressure on the wrong part of your 3rd finger which could eventually lead to injury. it also makes it more difficult to transition to other chords. For example you could be playing a I IV V progression in the key of G
G maj- C Maj- D7

if you played the C major chord using the 2 barr method you would need to move your 3rd and 4th fingers just to play the D7 chord correctly, rather than just taking one finger off or moving your third finger up one string.

Also with the 4 finger method, you dont have to worry about muting the high e string.