#1
Are instrumental bands appreciated as much today as they were back in the 80s and stuff? Like Joe Satriani and Steve Vai were really big in the 80s and that's why they are so famous now, but if someone started an instrumental band, would they be respected, for lack of better words, by audiences and stuff just as much as bands with singers are?

I mean, you know most music-listeners today, they have to have lyrics in order to appreciate music.
#3
They'll never be respected as much by as wide an audience as vocally oriented bands, and they never really were, even back in the 80s. Frank Zappa wrote about how the majority of his lyrics (aside from some of the political/social commentaries) were just there because there wasn't any market for instrumental music.

edit: ^ I really wish that was true, but the reality is that a good chunk of listeners WILL write a band off as soon as they figure out that nobody on stage is holding a microphone.
Last edited by Stickymongoose at Jul 21, 2009,
#4
Quote by Stickymongoose
They'll never be respected as much by as wide an audience as vocally oriented bands, and they never really were, even back in the 80s. Frank Zappa wrote about how the majority of his lyrics (aside from some of the political/social commentaries) were just there because there wasn't any market for instrumental music.


But then look at Joe Satriani... He's never had an album (besides with Chickenfoot) that's had vocals and he's very well-known, even to some of the mainstream audiences. And the same with Steve Vai too, although he played with David Lee Roth, so that probably helped him a little.
#5
i very much respect the royal philharmonic orchestra, the london symphony orchestra in fact all manner of orchestras. They are also very well respected globally - so no i don't think a band *needs* singers to be respected. However, they must earn that respect by performing/writing music which can hold the audiences attention without the need for lyrics. Guitar based rock bands don't tend to be able to do that because of the relatively narrow range of sounds they can produce. The vocals are the most dynamic part of the arrangement and it therefore sounds very flat without them.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
Last edited by doive at Jul 23, 2009,
#6
Quote by ItsOnlyGNR
But then look at Joe Satriani... He's never had an album (besides with Chickenfoot) that's had vocals and he's very well-known, even to some of the mainstream audiences. And the same with Steve Vai too, although he played with David Lee Roth, so that probably helped him a little.



whats your point

better yet, what the **** are you comparing them too.?
Last edited by pepsi1187 at Jul 21, 2009,
#7
The guy is pretty much one of the best guitarists and instrumental performers of our time, and he's kind of well known to some of the mainstream audiences? I think that pretty much proves my point. I'm not saying that some extreme cases (Vai and Satriani) won't fight their way into some mainstream listeners' playlists, but it's a whole heck of a lot harder for them than most any vocal band.
#8
Quote by pepsi1187
whats your point

better yet, what the **** are you comparing them too.?


I'm comparing them to modern instrumental bands and artists.
#10
A guitar based band really struggles to pull off purely instrumental songs because there is only really one 'tone' coming out. Orchestras pull it off because they have a huge range of types of sound they can go for - a flute has broadly the same range as a violin but they create different sounds. Vocals allow guitar based bands to transcend the one or two sounds they have as the voice can have massive range of different tones and can easily add emotion to a piece. Satch and vai get away with it because they can use their guitars very fully to produce a wide enough dynamic range to create interest. It takes a special talent and appreciation of equipment/effects to be able to do that, which is why so few people can.
The only 6 words that can make you a better guitarist:

Learn theory
Practice better
Practice more
#11
It will never be appreciated in the mainstream sense, but there are tons of instrumental post-rock bands and electronic artists that have a pretty large fan base.
#12
I think it's important for the crowd to be able to sing along. I think that's what stops instrumental bands from becoming mainstream.

People that don't play any instrument are ignorant to the complexities of playing an instrument. They just want it to sound good and to have a good time.
#13
no instrumental bands get sh*t on.

all people care about are the lyrics nowadays, cause thats all they know how to listen to. they dont understand guitars or drums or bass, they just know english
'Music is the best"
Zappa
#14
The thing about instrumental music is that it can't stay the same like it can with mainstream music. It has to be constantly changing and interesting, so it actually requires skill rather than those bands who play G over and over again for the entire song. Most of the instrumental bands I've heard recently are like side projects though, like Liquid Tension Experiment or Gordian Knot.