#1
title says it all, i'm trying to learn music theory but intervals just dont make sense the way the column, "The Crusade" explains it
#3
An interval is the space between 2 notes. Assuming you know how major scales work, a major 2nd interval is the space between the root note of a Major scale and it's second degree, so 2 semitones. A major 3rd is the space between the root and the 3rd degree, so 4 semitones. A minor 3rd is a major 3rd minus a semitone.

Refer here for more info:
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/html/id30_en.html
http://www.musictheory.net/lessons/html/id31_en.html
#4
Quote by Frankie_Stone
http://www.musictheory.net/

Try this and go through the lessons in order. It should give you a good start for music theory.



but thats, for a piano.

by the way i can read music, but not for guitar, only for trumpet
#5
Quote by Soul Power1111
but thats, for a piano.

by the way i can read music, but not for guitar, only for trumpet

Only uses piano as an instrument to play, the theory applies to all instruments.
#6
Quote by Frankie_Stone
http://www.musictheory.net/

Try this and go through the lessons in order. It should give you a good start for music theory.

Thank you so much for this! I will be using this excessively
Your mother likes it ruff, Trebeck.
#7
Quote by pwrmax
Only uses piano as an instrument to play, the theory applies to all instruments.



yeah but i dont know where the hell a c is on my guitar, i learned all by tabs and ear
#8
Quote by Soul Power1111
yeah but i dont know where the hell a c is on my guitar, i learned all by tabs and ear



Google fretboard notes
Your mother likes it ruff, Trebeck.
#9
Quote by Soul Power1111
yeah but i dont know where the hell a c is on my guitar, i learned all by tabs and ear

Oh .. then you need to learn the fretboard in order to be able to apply all the theory you learned, at least on guitar anyway. Save intervals and any theory you learning at the moment for later and focus more on the fretboard.
#10
Quote by Soul Power1111
yeah but i dont know where the hell a c is on my guitar, i learned all by tabs and ear

Then that's why it's all falling down - you can't learn theory if you don't know the notesw you're using so learn those first.
Actually called Mark!

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#11
It is actually significantly easier to learn theory on the piano than the guitar because of the black keys.

the intervals are minor 2nd, major 2nd, minor 3rd, major 3rd, perfect fourth, tritone/augmented 4/diminished 5th, minor 6th, major 6th, minor 7th, major 7th, octave. after that are compound intervals which you should worry about later.

pick a fret. go up one fret = minor 2nd (relative to starting note), go up another fret, major 2nd, up another minor 3rd, and as you go up another fret it is the next interval in the list above.

but yeah learn your notes on the fretboard first and you won't even have to think about it. you'll play a C and want to go up a major third and will immediately know that's an E and where the E is.

do the interval ear trainer at musictheory.net too. it is cool.
Earth without ART, is just Eh...
#12
Quote by Soul Power1111
yeah but i dont know where the hell a c is on my guitar, i learned all by tabs and ear


Good lord, you have a low E string, then the string above it is A.

Your turner tells you that.

Now from trumpet you know that from A there is A# (1st fret) B (2nd fret) then C (OH WOW, 3 ****ING FRET ON THE SECOND ****ING STRING).


Come on man, if you are going to ask us to help you with theory, atleast make an effort to help yourself.
#13
don't look at another tab either. they teach you nothing.
Earth without ART, is just Eh...
#14
Quote by metalzeppelin
don't look at another tab either. they teach you nothing.

I agree, stick with notation for a while. You already know how to read a treble clef, you know what semitones are, you know how a guitar is tuned so you can do it without any major problems. The open low E string is below 3 ledger lines, A string is 2 ledger lines down, D at the bottom of the staff, G is the second line, B is the 3rd line, E at the top of the staff. Now just add or subtract a semitone for every fret you move.