#1
Well soon ill be recording 2 songs at a studio for our EP and well its our first time going into a studio so i need some help.. Umm. im just making sure but you do get to record like little bits at a time right? Like record like chorus and then verse seperately or even half of those each?

What else should i remember??

Thanks
#2
Well, you can work like that, but your studio engineer would probably have you throw done a drum track first, then bass, then guitar, then vocals. On each section (Minus vocals) you will probably do one take, then go back through and clean up the messy parts.

That is generally how I run things, and it is a general kinda workflow. Not saying you can't do it differently, but that is what you should expect.
#4
i like recording drums at one take, but if your drummer isnt tight enough to do it do it in a few takes.
dont forget to practice alot with a metronome before recording!
#5
it depends what your talking about it spot tracking

try to do it all in a take, but if u need to switch from dist to clean
let the last note of the dist to ring out, the engineer will fade that out and you will restart the recording on clean

pre-production is a must, write out the song structures chords used and other liner notes so the person recording understand what you need and help you to achieve it

but like i said generally you will try to do stuff in one take but can be spotted for errors made, doubling and overdubbs
#6
Yes you can do that, but it kinda depends on the guy who's recording you and what he thinks you should do.

My band just got out of the studio and heres how we did it:

Drum Tracks
1st Guitar Track
2nd Guitar Track
Bass Track
Any additional Guitar Tracks
Vocals

We did about 5 takes for the drums per song and ran all the way through the song each time we played it. If I were you, I would do that but also go section by section at least once. That might help keep you in time.

The most important thing to remember is to always use a clicktrack, especially if you have a lot of "stop and go" parts in your songs like my band does. It makes life in the studio a heck of a lot easier. I really wish I would have done this when we went
#7
Generally you record as much of a track as you can until there's a problem area, which can be overdubbed later. That's my preferred method anyway, some people do use the whole "bits and pieces" approach, however I personally find it a bit clinical, in that it takes away from the music's energy.

MAKE SURE you put new strings on guitars and basses, and that your drummer has fresh drum heads. Take a couple of packs with you for spares just in case.

It'd be a good idea to take some cassettes or CD-Rs with you so as everyone gets a copy. This way you can listen to the recordings at home and pick out any parts that you're not entirely happy with.

That's about it really. Good luck!
#8
Wait. sorry but not quite getting it.. Does that mean you have to play the whole song PERFECT when you record guitar?? Or is there a way to fix it? Overdubb??
#9
Quote by 321caleb
Wait. sorry but not quite getting it.. Does that mean you have to play the whole song PERFECT when you record guitar?? Or is there a way to fix it? Overdubb??


No...I think he means you record it, and if there's any dodgy bits you record them again.

EDIT: By the way 321caleb, you might wanna check out the band in my sig. You might like their guitarist.
Last edited by denfilade at Jul 22, 2009,
#10
wow denfilade!! i really love hte guitaring!! and the rest! exept the drums? are they fake?
#11
Quote by 321caleb
wow denfilade!! i really love hte guitaring!! and the rest! exept the drums? are they fake?


Lol thanks, TS, going offtopic in your own thread

On topic, I wouldn't worry too much about recording the whole song in one take. I'm sure the guy at the studio would understand if you just wanted to do bits at a time.