#1
Okay, so before I ask my question, just a quick disclaimer. I know what modes are and how they work, and I understand that they are completely different scales from the major scale and they should;d be used differently, with different chord progressions etc. So for the purpose of answering this question please refrain from criticizing my terminology and the way I am simplifying the scales.

I want to know if there are anymore scales that are actually used in pop, jazz, and classical, other than the ones I know.

I am familiar with (or am aware of the existence of):
The Major Scale and its seven modes
The Harmonic Minor and its seven modes
Melodic Minor (ascending pattern) and its seven modes
The Major and Minor pentatonic scale
Whole Tone Scale (two of these)
and The Chromatic Scale

are there any other scales that are used in western music that I should be aware of?
#2
Not in western music. At least not that I can think of

If you know all that you should be good

Now all you need to do is start writing music
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Last edited by Nietsche at Jul 22, 2009,
#4
Quote by TechnoJesus™
Do you know of the different modes like dorian and phrygian?
Quote by SKAtastic770
The Major Scale and its seven modes
The Harmonic Minor and its seven modes
Melodic Minor (ascending pattern) and its seven modes
Read the OP properly next time
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#5
Diminished, Augmented which is kind of like the whole tone scale.

This question kind of bugs me, because there aren't really a set number a scales. I know you're asking for scales that are used commonly in western music, which is what all these scales are, but there are tooons of ways you can arrange the 12 different notes, which means there are tooons of scales (most of which are unnamed).
#7
Quote by NewShred
Diminished, Augmented which is kind of like the whole tone scale.

This question kind of bugs me, because there aren't really a set number a scales. I know you're asking for scales that are used commonly in western music, which is what all these scales are, but there are tooons of ways you can arrange the 12 different notes, which means there are tooons of scales (most of which are unnamed).
Most of those are best described as the major/minor scales with a few chromatics
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#8
Look up the Chinese and Japanese scales.
Quote by AlanHB
Yeah well in special UG land chords = noob, scales = intermediate and modes = advanced. Most users are trying to finish the game on hard because then you get the trophies for noob and intermediate difficulties upon completion anyway.
#9
Quote by Nietsche
Most of those are best described as the major/minor scales with a few chromatics


I guess in a sense, but you could describe any scale by just relating it to the major/minor scale. For example, the harmonic minor is considered it's own scale even though it's just minor+natural 7th.
#10
Quote by NewShred
I guess in a sense, but you could describe any scale by just relating it to the major/minor scale. For example, the harmonic minor is considered it's own scale even though it's just minor+natural 7th.


Actually, it's not considered its own scale. You would never compose a song "in" Harmonic Minor, so it's not a scale by itself. It's simple of variant of the minor scale that is always used with the minor scale -- it's completely dependent.

TS: There a lot more scales, but you've got all of the useful ones covered. Just keep working on Major and minor and you should be good.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#11
^^ Yeah I know you're right. I just meant *he* considered it it's own scale. My bad.
#12
Id say
Bebop Major- Major scale with an added #5.
1-2-3-4-5-#-5-6-7-1
Bebop Minor (perhaps not the proper name)- Dorian mode with an added natural 3
1-2-b3-3-4-5-6-b7-1
Bebop Dominant (again maybe not the right name)- Mixolydian Mode with an added major seventh
1-2-3-4-5-6-b7-7-1
And be familiar with your half-whole and whole-half diminished scales.
Also, do you know the scales you listed in 12 keys and 5 positions, or do you just know patterns? If you don't know a scale in 12 keys, theres not much of a point in knowing it.
Do you know the theory behind those scales?
Can you harmonize every one of them (both on paper and on a guitar)?
Can you sing all of them from memory (again, in my opinion and experience you don't really know a scale if you can't sing it from memory).
EDIT: there is a bebop scale for half diminished chords, I just do not know it, though im sure you could look it up. Theres a cheap book (about 7.95) by Joe Ripso called Bebop Scales, Jazz Scales and Patterns in all 12 keys. Its probably the best scale method Ive worked out of. It also explains how there supposed to be used (timing it rhythmically so the chord tones fall on strong beats and the non chord tones fall on weak beats).
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Jul 22, 2009,
#13
Quote by tehREALcaptain
*Stuff about bebop scales*
I don't think he really needs to learn those. The bebop scales are generally regular major or minor scales with added chromatic passing tones so that if you start playing from a chord tone and on a downbeat you hit all the other chord tones on a downbeat (Usually used over jazz chords)

For example E bebop major being played over an E major6th chord (All the chord tones marked with C's)
     C     C     C     C     C
e|-------------------------------|
B|-------------------------------|
G|------------------5--6--8--9---|
D|---------6--7--9---------------|
A|---7--9------------------------|
E|-------------------------------|
They're really only useful over Jazz chords and only work properly if you go up intervallically
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Last edited by Nietsche at Jul 22, 2009,
#15
Quote by slayerfrk
i didnt realise there where 2 whole tone scales when the whole tone scale is symetrical...
Yep. Half-whole and Whole-half

There's a good article about it on wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Octatonic_scale

EDIT: Sorry what you're talking about and what he's talking about are different things. You just misunderstood what he said. He's talking about the half/whole and whole/half scale. Your talking about the whole tone scale. Or he has no idea about the whole tone scale and I've misinterpreted what I think he's trying to say
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Last edited by Nietsche at Jul 22, 2009,
#16
Yes, Bebop Scales are just adding passing tones to regular scales, but by studying them like scales you help your ears and fingers get used to adding passing tones that make you sound a bit more like a bebop player. And, if your talking about what scales you 'need' lots of players only need major and minor and mixolydian and sometimes the dorian mode as far as knowing scales goes. For rock and most jazz you really only need those scales, the blues scale and maybe a few diminished scales. But its usefull to learn other scales to expand your musical horizons.
#17
Quote by tehREALcaptain
Yes, Bebop Scales are just adding passing tones to regular scales, but by studying them like scales you help your ears and fingers get used to adding passing tones that make you sound a bit more like a bebop player.
I guess so. This is sort of the reason I defend modal playing. A lot of people say it's uselss but it gets you used to the sound of different combinations of notes and makes outside playing easier
And, if your talking about what scales you 'need' lots of players only need major and minor and mixolydian and sometimes the dorian mode as far as knowing scales goes. For rock and most jazz you really only need those scales, the blues scale and maybe a few diminished scales. But its usefull to learn other scales to expand your musical horizons.
+1
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#18
Quote by tehREALcaptain
Id say
Bebop Major- Major scale with an added #5.
1-2-3-4-5-#-5-6-7-1
Bebop Minor (perhaps not the proper name)- Dorian mode with an added natural 3
1-2-b3-3-4-5-6-b7-1
Bebop Dominant (again maybe not the right name)- Mixolydian Mode with an added major seventh
1-2-3-4-5-6-b7-7-1

I actually am a bit familiar with the bebop scale, the idea being that it ends on the first beat of a new measure, to emphasize the bebop phrasing. Thanks for the input guys, I'll make sure I practice what I knwo now until its perfect on both guitar and trumpet.