#1
I'm not the best when it comes to music theory, so when trying to figure out Ana by the Pixies I'm pretty much stumped.

I know they shift the key a half step up at certain points, and while I don't know if there's a particular name for that, it's been done a million times and is obvious.

What I'm failing to understand is how the chord progression makes sense. I know it sounds good to my ears, so if anyone could shed some light, it'd be appreciated.

btw, here's the link to the guitar pro version of the tab:
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/p/pixies/ana_guitar_pro.htm
and the text tab:
http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tabs/p/pixies/ana_tab.htm

Thanks again!
#2
I'll get back to you on the chord progression but shifting the key of a piece up a half step is called a truck drivers gear change

BTW I love the pixies
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#4
up half a step is called chromatic modulation

the person doing the chords didn't really do them right
Bbm C# F# Ab Bm Bb F are the chords they have
it has to do with enharmonic equivalents ie A# = Bb, D#=Eb, etc. same note, different names depedning on which key you are in. So work with that. I don't want to listen to it and analyze that and the modulation but figure out which key it's in, I'd guess Bm just since it's ends on that in the tab. Bm has two sharps. Hope that helps.
Earth without ART, is just Eh...
#5
Well there's two ways of looking at it. The chord progression is basically Bbm, A, C#, F# and the next section is the same up a semitone (As you already said)

My bet would be It's in F#major and the A major chord is borrowed from the parrallel minor
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#6
Quote by Nietsche
Well there's two ways of looking at it. The chord progression is basically Bbm, A, C#, F# and the next section is the same up a semitone (As you already said)

My bet would be It's in F#major and the A major chord is borrowed from the parrallel minor


That definitely makes sense, since the F# major scale fits most of the chords.
So I guess that leads to another question - are there any set rules regarding how or what can be borrowed from the parallel key? Or is it mostly just a matter of if it sounds good?
#7
my thing with enharmonics is there is no Bb in F# Major, it would be an A#. then i guess the borrowed AM chord makes sense. my theory book says it isn't usually done on a III or iii chord though so i don't know if it's correct. if someone has sheet music it would be a lot easier to do a RN analysis. it's hard to do from chord diagrams.

but to the original poster. if you aren't good with theory I wouldn't worry about trying to figure this song out because it will be over your head.
Earth without ART, is just Eh...
#8
major keys borrow the iio6, ii-half diminished 7th, iv, bVI, and viio7 chords from the minor scale and the minor scale borrows the I from the major (it's called a picardy 3rd and makes a stronger cadence).

straight out of my theory book.
Earth without ART, is just Eh...
#9
Quote by metalzeppelin
major keys borrow the iio6, ii-half diminished 7th, iv, bVI, and viio7 chords from the minor scale and the minor scale borrows the I from the major (it's called a picardy 3rd and makes a stronger cadence).

straight out of my theory book.
Would this theory text book happen to pre-occupy itself with classical music and conventions? I've seen people borrow the bIII from the minor scale in plenty of songs
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#10
Quote by Nietsche
Would this theory text book happen to pre-occupy itself with classical music and conventions? I've seen people borrow the bIII from the minor scale in plenty of songs


Wait a second, wouldn't the bIII be the II from the major scale? I always looked at that as changing the key to the fifth of the original key... err modulating it.
#11
Quote by Who Did What
Wait a second, wouldn't the bIII be the II from the major scale? I always looked at that as changing the key to the fifth of the original key... err modulating it.
Let me clarify by bIII I meant the major chord formed from the third degree of the minor scale. In F# the A major chord or the Bb major chord in G. A II would be an Ab major chord
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Last edited by Nietsche at Jul 22, 2009,
#12
Ah, ok. I was seeing that as a double flat, as the third is already flat in the minor scale. Know of any songs off the top of your head where they do that?
#13
Quote by Who Did What
Ah, ok. I was seeing that as a double flat, as the third is already flat in the minor scale. Know of any songs off the top of your head where they do that?
Not off the top of my head although Paul McCartney would be a prime suspect
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