#1
Well im trying to desolder the ground connection on my 3 way selector but i cant get the solder to even melt. I have a desoldering braid and a 25 watt iron. Ive tried just about everything, i even rested the iron on the connection while it was heating up to see if it would melt but nothing happens. Ive tried holding the iron on the connection for a few minutes after its reached the max heat and still nothing. Is my iron not getting hot enough or something? i dont really know what else to try so if anyone has any suggestions im all ears, otherwise im going to save myself alot of headaches and just buy a new selector switch.
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#2
gotta use simple chemistry/physics buddy.

think about it.

PV=nRT where P is pressure, V is volume, n is # of moles, R is a constant, and T is temperature. Volume is obviously constant, moles (mass) is constant, and R is constant. So basically the only variables are pressure and temperature. To raise temperature, add pressure...

So use the sharpest point of the iron and press it firmly against the lead solder and it should melt slowly. that's why the tips are sharp. To apply extra pressure.

EDIT: There's something pretty damn wrong with my equation.. kudos to whoever can figure out. But it works.
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Last edited by apak at Jul 22, 2009,
#3
Quote by apak
gotta use simple chemistry/physics buddy.

think about it.

PV=nRT where P is pressure, V is volume, n is # of moles, R is a constant, and T is temperature. Volume is obviously constant, moles (mass) is constant, and R is constant. So basically the only variables are pressure and temperature. To raise temperature, add pressure...

So use the sharpest point of the iron and press it firmly against the lead solder and it should melt slowly. that's why the tips are sharp. To apply extra pressure.

EDIT: There's something pretty damn wrong with my equation.. kudos to whoever can figure out. But it works.


uh, moles isn't the same thing as mass for one...
#4
Try a 40 watt iron, its what I use and it works great
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#5
Quote by ZoSo_bc89
uh, moles isn't the same thing as mass for one...

well it's for the people who don't know what moles are :P: . Not the mistake btw.... In the end, moles stays constant because mass stays constant. mass and moles are directly proportional, so it makes sense to use them kinda interchangeably when talking of lead solder..
Jackson RR5 ivory w/ EMG 81/85
Jackson DX6 w/ SD Distortion & Dimarzio Super Distortion
Fender Starcaster Sunburst
Mesa/Boogie DC-3
Johnson JT50 Mirage
Ibanez TS-9
Morley Bad Horsie 2
Boss CE-5

ISP Decimator
Boss DD-6
Korg Pitchblack
#6
Quote by apak
gotta use simple chemistry/physics buddy.

think about it.

PV=nRT where P is pressure, V is volume, n is # of moles, R is a constant, and T is temperature. Volume is obviously constant, moles (mass) is constant, and R is constant. So basically the only variables are pressure and temperature. To raise temperature, add pressure...

So use the sharpest point of the iron and press it firmly against the lead solder and it should melt slowly. that's why the tips are sharp. To apply extra pressure.

EDIT: There's something pretty damn wrong with my equation.. kudos to whoever can figure out. But it works.

That equation is for gases, not solids and liquids
Last edited by Locked_Deadbolt at Jul 22, 2009,
#7
Quote by Locked_Deadbolt
That equation is for gases, not solids and liquids :P
LOL yes That was it! well, it works, in principle. i mean, it shouldn't work technically, but increase in pressure means an increase in temperature all the time, so there.. you nerd!!
Jackson RR5 ivory w/ EMG 81/85
Jackson DX6 w/ SD Distortion & Dimarzio Super Distortion
Fender Starcaster Sunburst
Mesa/Boogie DC-3
Johnson JT50 Mirage
Ibanez TS-9
Morley Bad Horsie 2
Boss CE-5

ISP Decimator
Boss DD-6
Korg Pitchblack
#8

Anyways, power equals energy over time. 25 watts simply means 25 J per second. Just hold it there longer.
#9
Quote by Locked_Deadbolt

Anyways, power equals energy over time. 25 watts simply means 25 J per second. Just hold it there longer.

with extra pressure. you'll get most pressure at the tip because of less surface area.
Jackson RR5 ivory w/ EMG 81/85
Jackson DX6 w/ SD Distortion & Dimarzio Super Distortion
Fender Starcaster Sunburst
Mesa/Boogie DC-3
Johnson JT50 Mirage
Ibanez TS-9
Morley Bad Horsie 2
Boss CE-5

ISP Decimator
Boss DD-6
Korg Pitchblack
#10
Lol. Yes. The smaller point applies more energy in a concentrated area. Let's not turn his thread into a physics class though
#11
Quote by Led Head
Well im trying to desolder the ground connection on my 3 way selector but i cant get the solder to even melt. I have a desoldering braid and a 25 watt iron. Ive tried just about everything, i even rested the iron on the connection while it was heating up to see if it would melt but nothing happens. Ive tried holding the iron on the connection for a few minutes after its reached the max heat and still nothing. Is my iron not getting hot enough or something? i dont really know what else to try so if anyone has any suggestions im all ears, otherwise im going to save myself alot of headaches and just buy a new selector switch.
Maybe your iron is dying or maybe you have poor thermal conductivity. You might need to clean the part where the tip attaches to the heater. Or you might have so much oxide on the tip that it won't allow the heat to transfer well enough to the soldered joint.

NEVER leave the iron in contact with a part for an extended period of time. That allows heat to travel though the part and melt plastic insulators, etc. You might not be able to melt solder, but you can certainly cause damage with temperatures that are somewhat below the melting point of solder.

Are you able to melt fresh solder, if you touch it to the tip of the iron? If not, try wiping the tip on a damp cloth, then touching fresh solder to the tip.
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