#1
Okay, so I'm a bit of an amp novice, and I keep on hearing this term "voicings." There are four main ones that I hear: Modern, Vintage, American, and British. What is the difference between these? Differences in tones? What styles of music suit what tones? Thanks.
#2
Quote by Raxef
Okay, so I'm a bit of an amp novice, and I keep on hearing this term "voicings." There are four main ones that I hear: Modern, Vintage, American, and British. What is the difference between these? Differences in tones? What styles of music suit what tones? Thanks.


Vintage generally refers to british class A(not that all vintage amps are british)

modern normally refers to high gain american style amps class B (or AB i think)

class A amps use el34 tubes generally giving a messier / wooly warm tone ACDC Led Zep Slayer

class B amps use 6l6 tubes generally giving a very clean colder shrilly brilliant sound Dream Theater BFMV. Fender amps are also class b so surf guitar shrilly clean tones also
Last edited by Stupot1 at Jul 22, 2009,
#3
i dont think anyone makes any full class b amps actually (though i could be wrong). most amps are A/B in a push-pull configuration, with some amps being class A.

ok, so modern would be sounds that are very tight and refined, usually high gain. think of metal bands that are newer and the sounds they produce. i think of it as very crisp sounding i guess.

vintage would be old style rock and roll. class A amp turned all the way up would be an idea of this. very raw with a bit of fuzziness to the sound, but not like the way of a fuzz pedal. sorta like its not quite fully refined.

american voiced is fendery or mesa-ish. comes from the type of tube used in part. fender style cleans and mesa style gain would be my description.

brittish is stuff like marshalls and vox. again, partly from the type of tubes used. vox-y cleans (think AC-30 turned up) and then a marshall turned way up for gain. not so much super clean or super distorted for the most part, more like a grainy clean and really crunchy distortion i guess.

its also kinda hard to describe in words (for me at least). especially since what i decribe one way, someone else could think i mean something completly different. the best way to figure it out is to get some sound clips that are very distinctly in each style.
#4
it's easy.

vintage/brittish voiced usually contains more mids than modern/american, which has a more scooped sound.
Quote by ClassicAxe

consider anything derek suggests, He IS a gain VVhore you know
Quote by jj1565
derek, will you go out wt me?

President Gain Whore -group on profile
#5
Oh, and my tone that I'm looking for is punk, pop punk, alternative, and Indie (Both US and UK versions). So what voicing would be good for that?
#6
depends. both really.
Quote by ClassicAxe

consider anything derek suggests, He IS a gain VVhore you know
Quote by jj1565
derek, will you go out wt me?

President Gain Whore -group on profile
#7
Quote by Stupot1
Vintage generally refers to british class A(not that all vintage amps are british)

modern normally refers to high gain american style amps class B (or AB i think)

class A amps use el34 tubes generally giving a messier / wooly warm tone ACDC Led Zep Slayer

class B amps use 6l6 tubes generally giving a very clean colder shrilly brilliant sound Dream Theater BFMV. Fender amps are also class b so surf guitar shrilly clean tones also


your amp class doesn't neccessarily determine your tube type. it's an indication of you bias, where a class A amp is at the middle of your output level wavelength, resulting in a "hot" (but also inefficient... and not "hot" as in "oh wow, so much distortion!" more like, "oh wow, all of my signal is being processed!") bias. Many vintage amps are class A (AC-30 comes to mind). "British" voicings get their name from early British amps (ie. Marshall Plexi's). They are very mid-rangey amps and usually are stocked with EL-34's. "Modern" voiced amps are typically class AB. Class AB amps are biased somewhere inbetween class A and class B's (oh, almost forgot, class B amps are biased at the "0" output point along their respective output wavelength... very efficient, but causes crossover distortion as the tubes work in pairs, one each to process the high and low points of the output... ok, back to class AB). with a bias between classes A and B (and I say "somewhere" because this varies from model to model), class AB amps are more efficient (generate less heat) than class A's, and they have much less noticable crossover distortion, as each tube in a pair is processing more than 50% of the signal at all times. "American" voiced amps are most often class AB and typically use 6L6 type tubes... but not always. 6L6 tubes have a flatter EQ (more bass and treble, less mids) and more even-order harmonics than EL-34's and are commonly found in "Modern" voiced amps, but again not always.

I know I worded that very confusingly... sorry. as I read it back to myself I had to make sure it even made sense to me! it'll prolly be clearer the 4th or 5th time through.

EDIT: jof gave some good descriptions as to what kinds'a amps make those sounds. if you're uncertain about what those amps sound like, i'd suggest noting those he listed and walking into a guitar center (prefferably one in a large city, as they're more likely to have those amps or similar ones... just give the name of the amp as a description, and try to find a salesman who seems less full of s***) under the guise that you're "looking to buy today!" and just try them out.

EDIT 2: what stu said about vintage and modern amp generally being class A and AB respectively is more or less accurate... I was mainly trying to point out that tube type isn't dictated by amp class. tube type does have a ton to do with American (6L6 or equivalent, typically) and Brithish (EL-34...) voicings though. There, that's much easier.
Last edited by GrisKy at Jul 22, 2009,